Warwick Anderson

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Warwick Hugh Anderson (born 1958), physician, poet, and historian, is an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow and Research Professor in the Department of History and Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine (VELiM) at the University of Sydney.

Additionally, he is an honorary professor in the School of Population Health, University of Melbourne.[1] He is a fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and a fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.[2] As a historian of science and medicine, Anderson focuses on the biomedical dimensions of racial thought, especially in colonial settings, and the globalisation of medicine and science. He has introduced anthropological insights and themes to the history of medicine and science; developed innovative frameworks for the analysis of science and globalisation; and conducted historical research into the material cultures of scientific exchange. His influential formulation of the postcolonial studies of science and medicine has generated a new style of inquiry within science and technology studies.[3]

Early life and education[edit]

Anderson was born and educated in Melbourne, Australia, where he attended the University High School. His father, Hugh McDonald Anderson, is a leading folklorist and historian of Australian popular and literary culture, with more than forty books to his credit; his mother, Dawn Anderson, has written books on drama education and creativity.

He graduated from the University of Melbourne Medical School (M.B., B.S. [equivalent to the US M.D.]) in 1983. During the medical course he conducted neurophysiology research, supervised by Ian Darian-Smith, which earned him the B.Med.Sc. (1980). He was an intern at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, and had paediatric training at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, and the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford. In the 1986 season he was the assistant doctor for the Footscray Football Club (now the AFL Bulldogs). From 1987, he worked in general practice in the inner west of Melbourne, which he continued intermittently until 1999.

Anderson ("Dr. Androgen") was a co-presenter on the award-winning radio program "Spoonful of Medicine" (3RRR) from 1987–88.

Poetry[edit]

As a medical student, Anderson began writing and publishing poetry. More than forty poems have appeared in a range of leading journals in Australia and the US. His poetry collection, Hard Cases, Brief Lives (Adelaide: Ginninderra, 2011) was short-listed in 2012 for the Mary Gilmore Award of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature (ASAL).[4]

History of medicine and science[edit]

Anderson completed a PhD in the Department of the History and Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania in 1992. His dissertation was on US colonial medicine and public health in the Philippines, and his advisor was Charles E. Rosenberg. Before moving to Sydney, Anderson held appointments at Harvard University (1992–95); the University of Melbourne (1995–2000); UCSF and Berkeley (2000–2003); and the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2003–08). At Melbourne, he founded the Centre for Health and Society (1997)[5] and helped to establish the Onemda VicHealth Koori Health Unit (1998).[6] At Madison, he was chair of the Department of Medical History and Bioethics.

He was the founding editor of Health and History (1998), and served as associate editor for the East Asian STS Journal and Postcolonial Studies. He served on the councils of the American Association of the History of Medicine (AAHM), the Australian and New Zealand Society for the History of Medicine, the Australian Society of Health, Law and Ethics, History of Medicine in Southeast Asia (HOMSEA), the Institute of Postcolonial Studies (Melbourne), and the Pacific Circle.

Anderson was elected a fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities (FAHA) in 2012. He also was awarded a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation (2007–08), and he was a Frederick Burkhardt Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies (2005–06), which he held at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. In 2013 he was a Whitney J. Oates Fellow at the Humanities Council, Princeton University.

Among Anderson's key publications are:

  • The Cultivation of Whiteness: Science, Health, and Racial Destiny in Australia (MUP 2002 & 2005, Basic 2003, Duke 2006). Awarded the W.K. Hancock Prize of the Australian Historical Association (2004) and the Basic Books Prize in the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology (2001).[7] The research for this book was recognised in the award of the M.D. degree (by thesis) from the University of Melbourne (2002).[8]
  • Colonial Pathologies: American Tropical Medicine, Race, and Hygiene in the Philippines (Duke 2006 & 2008, Ateneo de Manila 2007).[9] Awarded the Social Science Prize (2008) of the Philippines National Book Awards.[10]
  • The Collectors of Lost Souls: Turning Kuru Scientists into Whitemen (Johns Hopkins 2008). NSW Premier’s General History Award (2009); William H. Welch Medal of the AAHM (2010) and the Ludwik Fleck Award of the Society for Social Studies of Science (2010).[11]
  • Unconscious Dominions: Psychoanalysis, Colonial Trauma, and Global Sovereignties, ed. with Deborah Jenson and Richard C. Keller (Duke 2011).

Additionally he is the author of more than 60 articles and book chapters.
Anderson is completing a book (with Ian R. Mackay) on the conceptual history of autoimmunity for the Johns Hopkins University Press.

Postcolonial studies of science and medicine[edit]

Anderson has published a number of manifestos for postcolonial approaches to explaining the globalisation of science and medicine, including:

  • Where is the postcolonial history of medicine? Bulletin of the History of Medicine. 1998; 72: 522–30[12]
  • Postcolonial technoscience. Social Studies of Science. 2002; 32: 643–58
  • Postcolonial histories of medicine. In: Medical History: The Stories and Their Meanings, 285–307. Ed. John Harley Warner and Frank Huisman. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press; 2004[13]
  • (With Vincanne Adams) Pramoedya’s chickens: postcolonial studies of technoscience. In: The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies, 3rd ed., 181–204. Ed. Edward J. Hackett, Olga Amsterdamska, Michael Lynch, and Judy Wajcman. Cambridge MA: MIT Press; 2007[14]
  • From subjugated knowledge to conjugated subjects: science and globalisation, or postcolonial studies of science? Postcolonial Studies. 2009; 12: 389–400[15]
  • Asia as method in science and technology studies. East Asian Science, Technology and Society Journal. 2012; 6: 445–51[16]

Reviewing The Collectors of Lost Souls: Turning Kuru Scientists into Whitemen, Dr Ivan Crozier of the University of Edinburgh wrote that Anderson had produced a significant contribution to the fields of Science and Technology Studies and medical history both, introducing methods and theories from one to the other.[17]

Race and ethnicity in the global south[edit]

In 2011, the Australian Research Council (ARC) awarded Anderson a Laureate Fellowship, making him the first historian to receive this award and the only applicant from the humanities to receive a fellowship in the initial round.[18] The fellowship supports comparative, transnational research in the history of ideas of race and human difference in the Global South.[19] These studies involve collaborators from Brazil, New Zealand, and South Africa, and over the course of the fellowship will support more than four post-doctoral fellows.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Warwick Anderson" Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. Retrieved 13 November 2013.
  2. ^ "Warwick Anderson" Australian Academy of the Humanities. Retrieved 6 November 2013; "Warwick Anderson" Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. Retrieved 6 November 2013.
  3. ^ Seth S. Putting knowledge in its place: science, colonialism, and the postcolonial, Postcolonial Studies Special Issue: Science, Colonialism, Postcolonialism 12(4): 373–83
  4. ^ Anderson W. Hard Cases, Brief Lives [Poetry]. Adelaide: Ginninderra Press; 2011.; "Mary Gilmore Award Shortlist Announced" Australian Poetry. Retrieved 13 November 2–13.
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ [2]
  7. ^ "W. K. Hancock Prize: Details of Previous Winners", Australian Historical Association. Retrieved 6 November 2013
  8. ^ Anderson W. The Cultivation of Whiteness: Science, Health and Racial Destiny in Australia. Melbourne: Melbourne University Press; 2002; and New York: Basic Books; 2003. Reprinted MUP, 2005; Duke University Press, 2006.
  9. ^ Anderson W. Colonial Pathologies: American Tropical Medicine, Race, and Hygiene in the Philippines. Durham NC: Duke University Press; 2006, reprinted 2008; and Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press; 2007.
  10. ^ "Award Winning Books" Philippines National Book Development Board. Retrieved 13 November 2013.
  11. ^ "Recent Awards", Johns Hopkins University Press. Retrieved 6 November 2013; Anderson W. The Collectors of Lost Souls: Turning Kuru Scientists into Whitemen. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press; 2008.
  12. ^ Where is the postcolonial history of medicine? Bulletin of the History of Medicine. 1998; 72: 522–30
  13. ^ Postcolonial histories of medicine. In: Medical History: The Stories and Their Meanings, 285–307. Ed. John Harley Warner and Frank Huisman. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press; 2004
  14. ^ (With Vincanne Adams) Pramoedya’s chickens: postcolonial studies of technoscience. In: The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies, 3rd ed., 181–204. Ed. Edward J. Hackett, Olga Amsterdamska, Michael Lynch, and Judy Wajcman. Cambridge MA: MIT Press; 2007
  15. ^ From subjugated knowledge to conjugated subjects: science and globalisation, or postcolonial studies of science? Postcolonial Studies. 2009; 12: 389–400
  16. ^ Asia as method in science and technology studies. East Asian Science, Technology and Society Journal. 2012; 6: 445–51.
  17. ^ Ivan Crozier, "Warwick Anderson. The Collectors of Lost Souls: Turning Kuru Scientists into Whitemen. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008. pp..", Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, vol. 67, no. 4 (October 2012), 670–72.
  18. ^ "2011 Australian Laureate Fellows: Professor Warwick Anderson", Australian Research Council. Retrieved 6 November 2013; "Professor Warwick Anderson Awarded Prestigious ARC Australian Laureate Fellowship", SOPHistry, School of Philosophical and Historical Enquiry, The University of Sydney, 12 August 2011. Retrieved 6 November 2013.
  19. ^ "Fellowships shed light on 21st-century democratisation and the history of Australian racial thought" The University of Sydney, 10 August 2011. Retrieved 6 November 2013.
  20. ^ "People", Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, The University of Sydney. Retrieved 6 November 2013.