Warwick Prize for Writing

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The Warwick Prize for Writing is an international cross-disciplinary prize, worth £50,000, that is given biennially for an excellent and substantial piece of writing in the English language, in any genre or form, on a theme that changes with every award.[1] It was launched and sponsored by the University of Warwick in July 2008. It is the only cross-disciplinary writing competition in existence, including things such as: scientific research, novels, poems, websites, movies and plays.[2] Works are open to be nominated by everyone at Warwick University, including professors, students, alumni and staff.[1]

The Prize Management Group[edit]

The Prize Management Group of the Warwick Prize for Writing is made up of senior professors and administrative staff drawn from across the faculties and includes the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Warwick. The Prize Management Group is responsible for the administration of the prize, including agreeing the rules, the guidelines for the judges and the arrangements for the award of the prize. The Prize Management Group is also responsible for choosing the judging panel.

2013[edit]

The judges for the Warwick Prize for Writing 2013 were Ian Sansom of the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies at the University of Warwick (Chair), Marina Warner CBE and Ed Byrne, Vice-Chancellor and President of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia.

2013 is the first time the prize has been won by a poet.

Winner is in bold.[3]

Author Shortlist titles
Jim Al-Khalili Pathfinders: The Golden Age of Arabic Science
Amy Espeseth Sufficient Grace
Cordelia Fine Delusions of Gender
Etgar Keret Suddenly, a Knock on the Door
Robert Macfarlane The Old Ways
Alice Oswald Memorial
Author Additional longlist titles
Julian Barnes The Sense of an Ending
Jonathan Franzen Freedom
Amitav Ghosh River of Smoke
Robert Gray Cumulus
Thomas Keneally The Daughters of Mars
Nidaa Khoury Book of Sins

2011[edit]

The theme for the 2011 award was "colour".[1]

Michael Rosen chaired the panel of five judges for the 2011 Warwick Prize for Writing, and was joined by the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Warwick, Professor Nigel Thrift, award-winning author Jenny Uglow, Times Literary Editor Erica Wagner and writer, cultural critic, public speaker and broadcaster Baroness Lola Young.

Winner is in bold.[4]

Author Shortlist titles
Nadeem Aslam The Wasted Vigil
Peter Forbes Dazzled and Deceived: Mimicry and Camouflage
Aminatta Forna The Memory of Love
Peter D McDonald The Literature Police: Apartheid Censorship and its Cultural Consequences
Michael Taussig What Color is the Sacred?
Derek Walcott White Egrets
Author Longlist titles
Nadeem Aslam The Wasted Vigil
Mark Bradley Colour and Meaning in Ancient Rome
Jasper Fforde Shades of Grey
Peter Forbes Dazzled and Deceived: Mimicry and Camouflage
Aminatta Forna The Memory of Love
Peter D McDonald The Literature Police: Apartheid Censorship and its Cultural Consequences
Rachel Polonsky Molotov's Magic Lantern
Lisa Robertson Lisa Robertson's Magenta Soul Whip
Iain Sinclair Hackney, That Rose Red Empire
Michael Taussig What Color is the Sacred?
Derek Walcott White Egrets

2009[edit]

The theme for the inaugural Warwick Prize for Writing was complexity. A longlist of 20 candidate titles was announced in November 2008, followed by the shortlist of six titles announced on 22 January 2009. The winner, Naomi Klein's The Shock Doctrine, was announced on 24 February 2009.

China Miéville, award-winning writer of weird fiction, chaired the panel of five judges. Professor Ian Stewart, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Warwick, provided a vital link between the Prize Management Group and the Judging Panel. The journalist Maya Jaggi, the author and translator Maureen Freely and the literary blogger Stephen Mitchelmore completed the Judging Panel.

Winner is in bold.[5]

Author Shortlist titles
Lisa Appignanesi Mad, Bad and Sad: A History of Women and the Mind Doctors from 1800
Francisco Goldman The Art of Political Murder: Who Killed Bishop Gerardi?
Stuart A Kauffman Reinventing the Sacred
Naomi Klein The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism
Alex Ross The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the 20th Century
Enrique Vila-Matas (trans. Jonathan Dunne) Montano's Malady
Author Longlist titles
Michael Blastland & Andrew Dilnot The Tiger That Isn't
Rachel Blau DuPlessis Torques: Drafts 58-76
John Burnside Glister
Mike Davies Planet of Slums
John Hughes Someone Else
Thomas Legendre The Burning
David Livingstone Adam's Ancestors: Race, Religion and the Politics of Human Origins
Robert Macfarlane The Wild Places
James Martin The Meaning of the 21st Century
Ian McDonald Brasyl
Joseph O'Neill Netherland
Juan Gabriel Vasquez (trans. Anne McLean) The Informers
Ivan Vladislavic Portrait with Keys
James Walvin The Trader The Owner The Slave

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c About the prize, official website.
  2. ^ "Comparing apples and pears, a new writing prize is the first to accept entries across all genres, from novels to scientific research", New Scientist, 21 March 2009, p. 45. Article quote: "Complexity was the theme of the first Warwick prize for writing, the only cross-disciplinary writing competition in any format."
  3. ^ Liz Bury (25 September 2013). "Alice Oswald wins Warwick prize". The Guardian. Retrieved 7 December 2013. 
  4. ^ Benedicte Page (24 March 2011). "Cultural history of camouflage wins Warwick Prize for Writing". The Guardian. Retrieved 7 December 2013. 
  5. ^ Alison Flood (24 February 2009). "Outstanding 'complexity' wins Naomi Klein £50,000 inaugural Warwick prize". The Guardian. Retrieved 7 December 2013. 

References[edit]