Wash West

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Wash Westmoreland (born March 4, 1966) is an independent film director who has worked in television, documentaries, independent films. His 2006 release, Quinceañera, had a double Sundance win (Audience Award and Grand Jury Prize), and also picked up the Humanitas Prize, and the John Cassavetes Spirit Award. In 2008, Westmoreland produced an MTV film Pedro about AIDS activist Pedro Zamora that was introduced on MTV by U.S. President Bill Clinton. Working with his partner Richard Glatzer, he directed The Last of Robin Hood in 2012 starring Kevin Kline, Susan Sarandon and Dakota Fanning that was released in August 2014 by Goldwyn. The duo's next film Still Alice, based on Lisa Genova's NYT bestselling book, stars Julianne Moore, Kristen Stewart, and Alec Baldwin. It premiered at Toronto Film Festival in 2014 and was considered the discovery of the festival.

Biography[edit]

Wash Westmoreland was born Paul Westmoreland in Leeds, England on March 4, 1966.[1] His father was a maintenance engineer for the CEGB and his mother worked as a receptionist at a local hair salon. He was named "Paul" after a member of the The Beatles but received the nickname "Wash" as a child.[1] He finished high school intending to pursue science at university level, but after a short disruptive spell in a religious cult changed his direction to study social science. Westmoreland earned his college degree in Politics and East Asian Studies at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Fukuoka University in Japan, graduating in 1990. He emigrated to America in 1992, initially living in New York City, then moving to New Orleans and finally to Los Angeles in 1995.

Collaboration[edit]

Since the late 1990s Wash Westmoreland has worked predominantly with his collaborator and husband Richard Glatzer, wiring and directing an eclectic set of independent movies. The duo are based in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles California

Shared Writing/Directing Credits[edit]

2001: The Fluffer[edit]

Glatzer and Washmoreland’s first collaboration was a look at obsession, addiction and power relationships in the gay porn industry. It premiered at Berlin and Toronto Film Festivals in 2001 and secured US distribution from First Run Features. It received mixed positive reviews and gained almost instant cult status, John Water’s including it in his famous series “Ten Films the will Corrupt You”.[2] The film starred Michael Cunio, Roxanne Day, Scott Gurney, and Deborah Harry.

2004: Gay Republicans[edit]

Working alone, Westmoreland made a documentary during the 2004 election season, following four Log Cabin Republicans as they responded to President George W. Bush’s initiative to alter the US Constitution to ensure that marriage was only legal between a man and a woman. The documenarty was produced for Andrew Cohen at Bravo, and Fenton Bailey and Randy Barbato at World of Wonder.[3] An extended version of the film premiered at the AFI festival in 2004 to a riotous response. It ended up winning the festival’s documentary prize and gaining a distribution deal on DVD.

2006: Quinceanera[edit]

Made for a budget of under $500,000, and featuring many first time actors, "Quinceanera" ended up winning both the Audience Award and the Grand Jury Prize at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival. It went on to win the prestigious Humanitas Prize, the John Cassavetes Prize at the Spirit Award in 2007, and many other Film Festival prizes all over the world.[4] It was picked up for the US by Sony Pictures Classics and distributed in over 25 countries worldwide.[5]

The plot focussed on a multigenerational Mexican-American family preparing for their daughter’s Quinceanera against the back drop of a gentrifying neighborhood. The film was entirely shot in Echo Park, which is where the directors live. On release, it received strong positive reviews scoring 87% on Rotten Tomatoes.[6] The lead actress, Emily Rios, went on to have a successful career starring in Friday Night Lights, ''Breaking Bad, and "The Bridge".

2008: Pedro[edit]

Working with Bunim-Murray productions, Glatzer and Washmoreland executive-produced a move called "Pedro" about Pedro Zamora — the AIDS activist who was cast on MTVs "The Real World in 1993.[7] The movie was directed by Nick Oceano and produced by Maggie Malina and Jon Murray. For a made for MTV movie, Pedro enjoyed a surprise International festival run. It premiered at Toronto Film Festival 2007 and Berlin 2008. President Bill Clinton recorded a special introduction for it when it premiered on television.

2013: The Last of Robin Hood[edit]

Glatzer originally heard of a book about Errol Flynn’s last love affair “The Big Love” through his mentor ay Presson Allen (Prime of Ms. Jean Brodie, Cabaret). The story is told by Flynn’s girlfriend’s mother, Florence Aadland with co-writer Tedd Thomey[8] and has been praised by the likes of William Styron and W.H. Auden as the ultimate unreliable narrator story. Glatzer and Westmoreland started researching the screenplay in 2003, earning the trust of Florence’s daughter, Beverly, and the friendship of author Tedd Thomey and Flynn’s chauffeur in his final years, Ronnie Shedlo.[9] They wrote the first draft of the screenplay in 2007 but it was not until 2011, and the attachment of Kevin Kline, that things started to move forward. Killer Films’ Christine Vachon and Pam Koffler came on to produce, and Susan Sarandon and Dakota Fanning signed on for the mother-daughter team of Florence and Beverly.[10] Production took place in Atlanta Georgia in 2013. The city’s various locations were used to represent Los Angeles, New York, French Equatorial Africa, Cuba and Vancouver.

The movie premiered at Toronto International Film Festival in 2013[11] to a mixed critical response. Several critics praised Kline’s performance as Oscar worthy,[12] whereas other seemed confounded by the movie’s lack of a moral stance.[13] Glatzer and Washmoreland’s intent had always been to focus on the permission for the relationship, afforded by the mother, rather than its morality.

2014: Still Alice[edit]

Based on a book written by Lisa Genova, "Still Alice" is a movie about a fifty year-old linguistics professor who develops early onset Alzheimer’s disease. Glatzer & Washmoreland were hired to adapt the book in 2011 by UK-based producing duo Lex Lutzus and James Brown.[14] Killer Films' Christine Vachon and Pam Koffler then came on as US production partners and Maria Shriver and ELizabeth Gelfand Stearns came on as executives and co-executive producers. Julianne Moore was Glatzer & Washmoreland’s first choice to play Alice. She was soon joined by Kristen Stewart and Kate Bosworth, who had been a long time fan of the book.[15] Alec Baldwin then came on to round out the cast, he and Moore’s having worked together on the TV show "30 Rock".[16]

Glatzer and Washmoreland changed the location for the film from Boston to New York and the university from Harvard to Columbia. Shooting took place over 23 days in March 2014.

The movie was picked up by Sony Pictures Classics, generating Oscar buzz, and released the film in December 2014.[17] Glatzer is living with ALS and some critics have suggested a connection between his own battle with illness and the raw, honest depiction of illness in the film.[18]

Early career[edit]

After working as a camera assistant on Bruce LaBruce's movie Hustler White, Westmoreland decided to enter the Adult Entertainment world to try to research a feature film project The Fluffer. He managed to land a job directing for BIG Video, a minor label and directed under the name Wash West and started making movies that challenged the conventional norms of the industry. Toolbox and Dr Jerkoff and Mr Hard were his first significant films. Then in 1997, he wrote and directed Naked Highway for BIG Video which swept both the 1997 Adult Erotic Gay Video Awards and the 1998 AVN Awards.

It was also during this time that Westmoreland started to make his presence in mainstream films felt. He appeared briefly in Velvet Goldmine by director Todd Haynes. Haynes would go on to work with Westmoreland as a producer on Quinceañera.

Westmoreland went on to direct the cat-and-mouse thriller Animus for All Worlds Video, which channeled the millennium fears of the time (1999) and featured performances from Blake Harper and Thomas Lloyd, who both won GayVN Awards for their work. Then he directed, The Devil is a Bottom which won the 2001 GayVN Award as Best Sex Comedy and was surprisingly listed as one of the LA Weekly Critic's Top Ten Movies of the year.[19]

His work culminated in 2001 independent film The Fluffer which was loosely based on many real events and characters. Around this time he gave a candid interview about his experiences in the industry to Terri Gross on NPR's Fresh Air. After this he only made two more adult movies; Seven Deadly Sins Gluttony for All Worlds Video, based on Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray and a parody of the horror film The Ring called The Hole for Jet Set Productions. Westmoreland picked up many GayVN Awards for both titles.


Filmography[edit]

As Wash Westmoreland

  • (2014) Still Alice co-director
  • (2013) The Last of Robin Hood writer, director
  • (2012) America's Next Top Model director
  • (2008) Pedro exec producer
  • (2006) Quinceañera writer, director
  • (2004) Gay Republicans writer, director
  • (2003) Totally Gay director (for VH-1)
  • (2001) The Fluffer writer, director
  • (1998) Velvet Goldmine actor
  • (1996) Hustler White actor, assistant camera

As Wash West

  • (2003) The Hole writer, director
  • (2002) Rubber is Natural (short) director
  • (2001) Seven Deadly Sins: Gluttony aka The Porno Picture of Dorian Gray writer, director, videographer
  • (1999) Animus writer, director, videographer
  • (1999) Technical Ecstasy writer, director
  • (1997) Naked Highway writer, director, videographer
  • (1998) Toolbox writer, director
  • (1996) Dr Jerkoff and Mr Hard writer, director, videographer
  • (1996) Taking the Plunge!director, writer
  • (1995) Squishy Does Porno writer, director

As Bud Light

  • (2005) Jet Set Direct: Take Two producer (one scene only)
  • (2004) Jet Set Direct: Take One producer (one scene only)
  • (2002) Porn Academy producer
  • (2000) Brothers in Arms producer
  • (2000) The Devil is a Bottom producer
  • (2000) Florida Erection producer
  • (1999) Lost Exit videographer
  • (1998) Red Hot and Safe producer

Awards[edit]

In addition, Wash West directed the following winners for Best Gay Video:

He also directed the following Best Sex Scene Winners:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Prestigiacomo, Jennifer (February 21, 2002). "Fluffer explores most difficult job in porn industry". University Wire.
  2. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Waters_Presents_Movies_That_Will_Corrupt_You
  3. ^ http://articles.latimes.com/2004/nov/16/entertainment/et-afi16
  4. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0451176/awards?ref_=tt_awd
  5. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0451176/
  6. ^ http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/quinceanera/
  7. ^ http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/06/01/pedro-zamora-a-hero-in-the-real-world.html
  8. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Big_Love
  9. ^ http://www.landmarktheatres.com/letters/lastofrobinhood.htm
  10. ^ http://www.cinemaartscentre.org/event/the-last-of-robin-hood-starring-kevin-kline-susan-sarandon-dakota-fanning-2-2-2/
  11. ^ http://www.tiff.net/festivals/thefestival/2013-programmes/specialpresentations/the-last-of-robin-hood
  12. ^ http://observer.com/2013/09/movies-theyre-what-i-want/
  13. ^ http://variety.com/2013/film/reviews/toronto-film-review-the-last-of-robin-hood-1200601881/
  14. ^ http://filmmakermagazine.com/87369-five-questions-for-still-alice-writerdirectors-richard-glatzer-and-wash-westmoreland/#.VEVISSmwL9o
  15. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5UmFVsgDSr8
  16. ^ http://www.eonline.com/news/152354/julianne-moore-and-alec-baldwin-spotted-filming-30-rock-today
  17. ^ http://variety.com/2014/film/news/still-alice-lands-oscar-qualifying-run-for-julianne-moore-1201314547/
  18. ^ http://variety.com/2014/film/reviews/toronto-film-review-julianne-moore-in-still-alice-1201301421/
  19. ^ "Wonder Boys and Girls". LA Weekly. December 2000. Retrieved 2007-06-27. 

External links[edit]

These websites may contain graphic pornographic images