Washington, Iowa

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Washington, Iowa
City
The north side of the Washington Square with the Courthouse in the background.
The north side of the Washington Square with the Courthouse in the background.
Official logo of Washington, Iowa
Logo
Nickname(s): City of Flowers and Trees
Location of Washington, Iowa
Location of Washington, Iowa
Coordinates: 41°18′0″N 91°41′21″W / 41.30000°N 91.68917°W / 41.30000; -91.68917Coordinates: 41°18′0″N 91°41′21″W / 41.30000°N 91.68917°W / 41.30000; -91.68917
Country  United States
State  Iowa
County Washington
Government
 • Mayor Sandra Johnson
Area[1]
 • Total 4.92 sq mi (12.74 km2)
 • Land 4.92 sq mi (12.74 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 761 ft (232 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 7,266
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 7,326
 • Density 1,476.8/sq mi (570.2/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 52353
Area code(s) 319
FIPS code 19-82335
GNIS feature ID 0462686

Washington is a city in and the county seat of Washington County, Iowa, United States.[4] It is part of the Iowa City, Iowa Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 7,266 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

Washington was founded in 1839 as the county seat of the newly established Washington County.[5]

Geography[edit]

Washington is located at 41°18′0″N 91°41′21″W / 41.30000°N 91.68917°W / 41.30000; -91.68917 (41.299941, -91.689175).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.92 square miles (12.74 km2), all land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical populations
Year Pop.   ±%  
1870 2,575 —    
1880 2,949 +14.5%
1890 3,235 +9.7%
1900 4,255 +31.5%
1910 4,380 +2.9%
1920 4,697 +7.2%
1930 4,814 +2.5%
1940 5,227 +8.6%
1950 5,902 +12.9%
1960 6,037 +2.3%
1970 6,317 +4.6%
1980 6,584 +4.2%
1990 7,074 +7.4%
2000 7,047 −0.4%
2010 7,266 +3.1%
Source:"American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau.  and Iowa Data Center
Kurtz House listed on the National Register of Historic Places

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 7,266 people, 3,048 households, and 1,861 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,476.8 inhabitants per square mile (570.2 /km2). There were 3,301 housing units at an average density of 670.9 per square mile (259.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.5% White, 1.4% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 2.7% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.7% of the population.

There were 3,048 households of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.5% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 38.9% were non-families. 33.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.93.

The median age in the city was 42.4 years. 23.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.1% were from 25 to 44; 25.9% were from 45 to 64; and 21.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.1% male and 51.9% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 7,047 people, 2,928 households, and 1,903 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,454.3 people per square mile (561.0/km²). There were 3,132 housing units at an average density of 646.3 per square mile (249.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.20% White, 0.57% African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 2.72% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.71% of the population.

There were 2,928 households out of which 27.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.8% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.0% were non-families. 30.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.88.

Age spread: 22.8% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 24.9% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, and 23.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 85.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $36,067, and the median income for a family was $44,497. Males had a median income of $29,961 versus $20,706 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,145. About 5.4% of families and 9.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.3% of those under age 18 and 5.7% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

Washington is governed by a six-member city council headed by a mayor. The mayor and council members are elected for four year terms. The city council consists of four ward counselors and two At-Large members. The current mayor is Sandra Johnson, and the council members are, Mark Kendall (At-Large), Merlin Hagie (At-Large), Robert Shepherd (Ward 1), Russ Zieglowsky (Ward 2), Robert Shellmyer (Ward 3), and Fred Stark (Ward 4).[8]

Notable people[edit]

Keith Molesworth was born in Washington, Iowa, in 1905 and graduated from Washington High. Due to his size (5 feet 7 inches and 98 pounds) he never started a prep football game. At 5 feet 9 inches and 167 pounds, he went to Monmouth College in Illinois, where he lettered for three years in four sports — football, baseball, basketball and track — earning a rare 12 letters. He was elected to the Monmouth College Hall of Fame in 1984.

Keith played four seasons in minor league baseball, then played for the independent pro Ironton Tanks football, beating the Chicago Bears in November 1930 and impressing Papa Bear Halas. He tried out for the Bears and played seven seasons as T-formation quarterback with Red Grange and Bronko Nagurski. The Bears were NFL Champs in 1930 and 1932. He was elected to the Iowa Athletic Hall of Fame in 1990.

Keith went on to spend eight years as back-field coach at the U.S. Naval Academy, then six years as semi-pro coach in minor league baseball before becoming backfield coach for the Steelers in 1952.

He was head coach of the Baltimore Colts in 1953 (their first season in existence). He remained with them as vice president and director of personnel until he died of a heart attack in 1966 at the age of 60.

Worked throughout his 40-year publishing career for Time-Life International, holding several executive positions and retiring in 1984 as group vice-president, secretary, and director of Time Inc. A former member of the U.S. Olympic Committee, he also served as Chair of the Board of Major League Baseball Properties and consultant to the Commissioner of Baseball.

Head football coach Tennessee Tech University and played seven years in the National Football League with the Detroit Lions and New York Jets. Hennigan was elected to the Tennessee Tech Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.

Brookhart served as president of the National Rifle Association from 1921 to 1925.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-23. 
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  5. ^ The History of Washington County, Iowa: Its Cities, Towns, Etc.. Union Historical Company. 1880. p. 542. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ http://washingtoniowa.net/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={1943ADD0-B592-4AFD-819A-1E150BD6BAEE}

External links[edit]