Washington, New Jersey

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Washington, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Washington
Motto: Hometown Friendly
Map of Washington in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County in New Jersey.
Map of Washington in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Washington, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Washington, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°45′31″N 74°58′59″W / 40.758525°N 74.98319°W / 40.758525; -74.98319Coordinates: 40°45′31″N 74°58′59″W / 40.758525°N 74.98319°W / 40.758525; -74.98319[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Warren
Incorporated February 20, 1868
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • Mayor Scott G. McDonald (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Manager / Clerk Kristine Blanchard[4][5]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.945 sq mi (5.039 km2)
 • Land 1.942 sq mi (5.030 km2)
 • Water 0.003 sq mi (0.009 km2)  0.18%
Area rank 417th of 566 in state
20th of 22 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 446 ft (136 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 6,461
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 6,420
 • Rank 331st of 566 in state
6th of 22 in county[12]
 • Density 3,326.8/sq mi (1,284.5/km2)
 • Density rank 199th of 566 in state
2nd of 22 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07882[13][14]
Area code(s) 908 Exchanges: 689, 835[15]
FIPS code 3404177270[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885432[18][2]
Website www.washingtonboro-nj.org

Washington is a borough in Warren County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 6,461,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 251 (-3.7%) from the 6,712 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 238 (+3.7%) from the 6,474 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] The borough is located in the eastern most region of the Lehigh Valley.

Washington was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 20, 1868, from portions of Washington Township.[20]

Geography[edit]

Washington borough is located at 40°45′31″N 74°58′59″W / 40.758525°N 74.98319°W / 40.758525; -74.98319 (40.758525,-74.98319). According to the United States Census Bureau, Washington borough had a total area of 1.945 square miles (5.039 km2), of which, 1.942 square miles (5.030 km2) of it is land and 0.003 square miles (0.009 km2) of it (0.18%) is water.[2][1]

Pohatcong Mountain is a ridge, approximately 6 mi (9.7 km) long, in the Appalachian Mountains that extends from west Phillipsburg northeast approximately to Washington. Upper Pohatcong Mountain extends northeast of Washington approximately 6 mi (9.7 km) to the vicinity of Hackettstown. The two ridges are sometimes called "Pohatcong Mountain" collectively.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 1,880
1880 2,142 13.9%
1890 2,834 32.3%
1900 3,580 26.3%
1910 3,567 −0.4%
1920 3,341 −6.3%
1930 4,410 32.0%
1940 4,643 5.3%
1950 4,802 3.4%
1960 5,723 19.2%
1970 5,943 3.8%
1980 6,429 8.2%
1990 6,474 0.7%
2000 6,712 3.7%
2010 6,461 −3.7%
Est. 2012 6,420 [11] −0.6%
Population sources:
1870-1920[21] 1870[22]
1880-1890[23] 1890-1910[24]
1910-1930[25] 1930-1990[26]
2000[27][28] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 6,461 people, 2,623 households, and 1,668 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,326.8 per square mile (1,284.5 /km2). There were 2,897 housing units at an average density of 1,491.7 per square mile (575.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 85.73% (5,539) White, 6.01% (388) Black or African American, 0.09% (6) Native American, 3.42% (221) Asian, 0.08% (5) Pacific Islander, 2.21% (143) from other races, and 2.46% (159) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 8.50% (549) of the population.[8]

There were 2,623 households, of which 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.3% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.4% were non-families. 30.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.09.[8]

In the borough, 23.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 28.3% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.3 years. For every 100 females there were 95.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.6 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $57,468 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,449) and the median family income was $68,510 (+/- $11,488). Males had a median income of $53,654 (+/- $13,162) versus $41,755 (+/- $12,531) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,554 (+/- $5,374). About 8.1% of families and 10.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.4% of those under age 18 and 14.0% of those age 65 or over.[29]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 6,712 people, 2,724 households, and 1,686 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,429.9 people per square mile (1,322.2/km2). There were 2,876 housing units at an average density of 1,469.6 per square mile (566.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.45% White, 3.89% African American, 0.12% Native American, 1.45% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.61% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.17% of the population.[27][28]

There were 2,724 households out of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.5% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.1% were non-families. 31.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.15.[27][28]

In the borough the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 33.8% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 99.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.0 males.[27][28]

The median income for a household in the borough was $47,000, and the median income for a family was $61,379. Males had a median income of $41,436 versus $31,880 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $23,166. About 5.0% of families and 5.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.5% of those under age 18 and 3.3% of those age 65 or over.[27][28]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Washington operates under the Faulkner Act (Council-Manager) form of municipal government, governed by a mayor and a six-member borough council, all of whom are elected at-large in partisan elections. The mayor and members of the borough council are elected to four-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two seats (plus the mayor) or four seats coming up for election every other year. The council selects a borough manager who is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the municipality.[6][30]

As of 2013, the borough's Mayor is Scott McDonald (D, term ends December 31, 2016).[31] Members of the Washington Borough Council are Deputy Mayor Jeanine Gleba (R, 2014), Ethel Conry (D, 2016), David Higgins (R, 2014), Justin Jewell (R, 2014), Richard Thompson, Jr. (R, 2016) and Robert Torres (R, 2014).[32][33][34][35]

In August 2009, the council selected Jeanine Gleba to fill the vacant seat of Republican Christina Woykowski, who had resigned weeks earlier.[36]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Washington Borough is located in the 5th Congressional District[37] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[9][38][39]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[40] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[41][42] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[43][44]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Washington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[45][46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[48]

Warren County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose three members are elected at-large on a staggered basis with one seat coming up for election each year. At an annual organization held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve sa Freeholder Director and other as Deputy Director. As of 2013, Warren County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Jason Sarnoski (R, Lopatcong Township, 2013) Freeholder Deputy Director Edward J. Smith (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2015) and Freeholder Richard D. Gardner (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2014).[49] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Patricia J. Kolb (Blairstown Township),[50] Sheriff David Gallant (Blairstown Township) and Surrogate Kevin O'Neill (Hackettstown).[51][52] The County Administrator, Steve Marvin, is responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operation of the county and its departments.[53]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,790 registered voters in Washington, of which 736 (19.4% vs. 21.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,136 (30.0% vs. 35.3%) were registered as Republicans and 1,917 (50.6% vs. 43.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[54] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 58.7% (vs. 62.3% in Warren County) were registered to vote, including 77.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 81.5% countywide).[54][55]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 1,160 votes here (48.5% vs. 56.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,158 votes (48.4% vs. 40.8%) and other candidates with 41 votes (1.7% vs. 1.7%), among the 2,391 ballots cast by the borough's 3,863 registered voters, for a turnout of 61.9% (vs. 66.7% in Warren County).[56][57] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,256 votes here (48.1% vs. 41.4% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 1,249 votes (47.9% vs. 55.2%) and other candidates with 43 votes (1.6% vs. 1.6%), among the 2,609 ballots cast by the borough's 3,730 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.9% (vs. 73.4% in Warren County).[58] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,477 votes here (58.1% vs. 61.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,021 votes (40.2% vs. 37.2%) and other candidates with 29 votes (1.1% vs. 1.3%), among the 2,540 ballots cast by the borough's 3,518 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.2% (vs. 76.3% in the whole county).[59]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 960 votes here (57.6% vs. 61.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 482 votes (28.9% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 167 votes (10.0% vs. 9.8%) and other candidates with 22 votes (1.3% vs. 1.5%), among the 1,666 ballots cast by the borough's 3,646 registered voters, yielding a 45.7% turnout (vs. 49.6% in the county).[60]

History[edit]

Washington Borough separated from Washington Township, which completely surrounds it, as of February 20, 1868.[20] The community grew during the 19th century as a result of the transportation routes that ran through or near the borough. The Morris Canal ran along the north end of town and two rail lines of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad crossed within the borough. Intersecting in the center of the borough are two major roadways, which today are Route 31 and Route 57. The borough was ultimately named for the "Washington House", a tavern built by Revolutionary War Col. William McCullough in 1811 that was later destroyed by fire in 1869.[61]

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the borough became a mecca of musical instruments manufacturers, the manufacture of organs in particular. A bustling downtown developed around these businesses. Many of the Victorian style houses in the borough, as well as Taylor Street School and Warren Hills Middle School (formerly Washington High School) were built during this period.

The advent of the automobile brought Washington closer to both the Lehigh Valley and New York City. In the years following World War II, the population increased, and there were many new houses and apartment complexes built. A portion of the Downtown area was devastated by a major fire in 1962. Education at the Middle and High School level was regionalized in 1968, and a new elementary school was also built (Memorial School).

The 1990s saw a population boom in Warren County, which continues today, as high real estate prices and property taxes in New Jersey’s northeastern counties push buyers to look further west. Although the borough itself does not have much room to grow, it has benefited from the growth of the nearby townships. Efforts are underway to revitalize the downtown with new residential and retail properties.

Education[edit]

Students in Kindergarten through sixth grade attend the schools of the Washington Borough Public Schools. As of the 2010-11 school year, the district and its two schools had a total enrollment of 543 students and 44.3 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.26:1.[62] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[63]) are Taylor Street School[64] with 240 students in grades K - 2 and Memorial School[65] with 298 students in grades 3 - 6.[66][67]

Public school students in seventh through twelfth grades attend the schools of the Warren Hills Regional School District, which also serves students from the municipalities of Franklin Township, Mansfield Township and Washington Township, along with those from Oxford Township who attend for grades 9-12 only.[68] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[69]) are Warren Hills Regional Middle School[70] (grades 7 and 8; 663 students) located in Washington Borough and Warren Hills Regional High School[71] (grades 9 - 12; 1,276 students) located in Washington Township.[66][72][73]

Students from the borough and from all of Warren County are eligible to attend Ridge and Valley Charter School in Frelinghuysen Township (for grades K-8)[74] or Warren County Technical School in Washington borough (for 9-12),[75] with special education services provided by local districts supplemented throughout the county by the Warren County Special Services School District in Oxford Township (for PreK-12).[76][66]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Washington include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Manager, Borough of Washington. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  5. ^ Clerk's Office, Borough of Washington. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 103.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Washington, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Washington borough, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 21, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 10. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Washington borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed September 21, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 21, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Washington, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 21, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Washington, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 21, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed September 21, 2012.
  20. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 248. Accessed September 21, 2012.
  21. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  22. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  23. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 100. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  24. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 339. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  25. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  26. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  27. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Washington borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 21, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Washington borough, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 21, 2012.
  29. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Washington borough, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 21, 2012.
  30. ^ Council – Manager form of Government, Borough of Washington. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  31. ^ Office of the Mayor, Borough of Washington. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  32. ^ Borough Council, Borough of Washington. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  33. ^ 2012 Official Directory, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  34. ^ GENERAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 2, 2010, WARREN COUNTY Official Tally for WARREN COUNTY of NJ, Warren County, New Jersey Clerk, November 5, 2010. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  35. ^ General Election November 6, 2012, WARREN COUNTY Tally for WARREN COUNTY of NJ, Warren County, New Jersey, November 19, 2012. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  36. ^ Novak, Stephen J. "Washington Borough Council selects Jeanine Gleba for vacant seat", The Express-Times, August 5, 2009. Accessed September 21, 2012. "Jeanine Gleba, who spent the last several years canvassing state legislators to get a law passed to help hearing-impaired children, is the newest member of borough council.... Gleba and borough planning board members Daniel Aron and Justin Jewell were nominated two weeks ago by the local GOP to complete the last year of the term of fellow Republican Christina Woykowski, who suddenly resigned a month ago. "
  37. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 66, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  41. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  42. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  43. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  44. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  46. ^ District 23 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  47. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  50. ^ County Clerk's Office, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  51. ^ Message from Surrogate, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  52. ^ Constitutional Officers, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  53. ^ 2012 Official Directory, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  54. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Warren, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  55. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  56. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  57. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  58. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  59. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  60. ^ 2009 Governor: Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  61. ^ History of Washington Borough, NJ Accessed April 18, 2011.
  62. ^ District information for the Washington Borough School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  63. ^ Data for the Washington Borough Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  64. ^ Taylor Street School, Washington Borough Public Schools. Accessed July 22, 2013.
  65. ^ Memorial School, Washington Borough Public Schools. Accessed July 22, 2013.
  66. ^ a b c Municipal Guide to Public School Districts, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  67. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Washington Borough Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  68. ^ Warren Hills Regional High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 16, 2013. "Warren Hills Regional High School offers a comprehensive educational program to students in grades 9 – 12. Students attending Warren Hills are residents of Washington Borough and the townships of Franklin, Mansfield, Oxford and Washington."
  69. ^ Warren Hills Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed June 2, 2013.
  70. ^ Warren Hills Regional Middle School, Warren Hills Regional School District. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  71. ^ Warren Hills Regional High School, Warren Hills Regional School District. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  72. ^ Our History, Warren Hills Regional School District. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  73. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Warren Hills Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  74. ^ Overview, Ridge and Valley Charter School. Accessed September 16, 2013. "Enrollment is open to any child in New Jersey, with preference for students from the districts of Blairstown, Frelinghuysen, Hardwick, Knowlton and North Warren Regional."
  75. ^ About Us, Warren County Technical School. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  76. ^ About, Warren County Special Services School District. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  77. ^ Johnston Cornish, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 12, 2007.

External links[edit]