Washington State Route 14

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State Route 14 marker

State Route 14
SR 14 is highlighted in red.
Route information
Defined by RCW 47.17.060
Maintained by WSDOT
Length: 180.66 mi[2] (290.74 km)
Existed: 1968[1] – present
Tourist
routes:
Lewis and Clark Trail Scenic Byway
Major junctions
West end: I‑5 in Vancouver
  I‑205 in Vancouver
SR 500 in Camas
US 197 near Dallesport
US 97 in Maryhill
East end: I‑82 / US 395 near Plymouth
Location
Counties: Clark, Skamania, Klickitat, Benton
Highway system
US 12 SR 16

State Route 14 (SR 14) is a 180.66-mile-long (290.74 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Washington. The highway travels east-west on the north side of the Columbia River, opposite Interstate 84 (I-84) to the south in Oregon. SR 14 forms a section of the Lewis and Clark Trail Scenic Byway and begins at an interchange with I-5 in Vancouver. The highway travels east as a four-lane freeway through Camas and Washougal and intersects I-205. SR 14 continues east as a two-lane highway through Clark, Skamania, Klickitat, and Benton counties before it ends at an interchange with I-82 and U.S. Route 395 (US 395) near Plymouth.

SR 14 was established in 1968 as the successor to US 830, created in 1926 with the original United States Numbered Highways, and Primary State Highway 8 (PSH 8). PSH 8 was added to the state highway system in 1905 as a short road along the Columbia River between Washougal and Lyle and was extended westwards to Vancouver and eastwards to Maryhill by 1913. PSH 8, designated as the Evergreen Highway, was extended east to the Tri-Cities in 1949 and this section was retained during the 1964 state highway renumbering and the decommissioning of US 830.

Route description[edit]

SR 14 eastbound in Vancouver

SR 14 begins as a continuation of the Lewis and Clark Trail Scenic Byway in downtown Vancouver at a partial cloverleaf interchange with I-5, Washington Street, and C Street, located on the first exit on I-5 north of the Interstate Bridge, which provides access to Portland, Oregon.[3][4][5] The four-lane freeway travels eastward, between the Columbia River and the Seattle Subdivision of the BNSF Northern Transcon route to the south and Pearson Field to the north,[6][7] and intersects Southeast Columbia Way in a single-point urban interchange, providing access to the Vancouver National Historic Reserve Historic District.[8] SR 14 continues southeast through suburban Vancouver, intersecting Riverside Drive in a partial cloverleaf interchange,[9] Lieser Road in a diamond interchange,[10] and Ellsworth Avenue in a partial diamond interchange,[11] before reaching a partial cloverleaf interchange with I-205 north of the Glenn L. Jackson Memorial Bridge, providing access to eastern suburbs of Portland.[12][13][14]

SR 14 travels east through an interchange with Southeast 164th Avenue before leaving Vancouver,[15] heading towards Camas. The freeway intersects Southeast 192nd Avenue in unincorporated Clark County before entering the city of Camas at an interchange with its business route on 6th Avenue.[16][17] SR 14 narrows to two lanes on Lady Island and enters downtown Camas after crossing the Camas Slough. The highway serves as a four-lane freeway bypass of Camas and travels through two partial double roundabout interchanges with SR 500, which travels northwestward to Orchards, and 2nd Street in Washougal.[18][19] SR 14 continues east past the Steigerwald Lake, Franz Lake, and Pierce national wildlife refuges, all located within Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area in Clark and Skamania counties. The highway also passes the Bonneville Dam in North Bonneville and the Bridge of the Gods before reaching Stevenson, the county seat of Skamania County. SR 14 leaves Stevenson traveling eastwards through the community of Carson River Valley and a series of tunnels along the Columbia River before crossing over the White Salmon River into Klickitat County near Underwood.[13][14]

The highway intersects SR 141 Spur and the Hood River Bridge, unsigned SR 35,[20] before reaching the cities of White Salmon and Bingen, where it passes the local Amtrak station and travels through a junction with SR 141. SR 14 continues east and crosses the Klickitat River into Lyle and forms the southern terminus of SR 142, which travels northeast towards Goldendale. The highway travels east to a junction with US 197 near Dallesport and to Wishram, passing its Amtrak station. SR 14 leaves the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area west of Maryhill, where the highway intersects its spur route and US 97, forming a short concurrency with the latter.[21] SR 14 continues northeast along the Columbia Hills and the Columbia River into Benton County, reaching a junction with SR 221 in Paterson. The highway ends at a diamond interchange with I-82 and US 395 northeast of Plymouth, located north of the Umatilla Bridge.[13][14][22]

Every year, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) conducts a series of surveys on its highways in the state to measure traffic volume. This is expressed in terms of average annual daily traffic (AADT), which is a measure of traffic volume for any average day of the year. In 2012, WSDOT calculated that the busiest section of SR 14 was east of its interchange with I-205 in Vancouver, serving 72,000 vehicles, while the least busiest section of the highway was in Maryhill, serving 500 vehicles.[23] SR 14 between Vancouver and Maryhill is designated as part of the National Highway System for its whole length,[24] classifying it as important to the national economy, defense, and mobility.[25] WSDOT designates the same corridor as a Highway of Statewide Significance,[26] which includes highways that connect major communities in the state of Washington.[27]

History[edit]

SR 14 at its interchange with I-205, built in the 1970s
See also: U.S. Route 830

The first highway that traveled through the Columbia River Gorge was surveyed in 1905 at a cost of $15,000 (equivalent to $393,722 in 2014[28]) by the state of Washington as a wagon road connecting Washougal in Clark County to Lyle in Klickitat County that was designated as secondary State Road 8.[29] State Road 8 was extended east from Lyle to Maryhill and northeast to the county seat of Goldendale in 1907.[30][31] The secondary highway, named the North Bank Highway, was re-aligned in 1913 to follow closer to the Columbia River and was extended west to Vancouver and east to Mabton via Satus Pass.[32][33][34] State Road 8 was co-signed with US 830 after the United States Numbered Highways were approved by the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) on November 11, 1926,[35][36] also creating a short concurrency with US 97.[37][38]

The North Bank Highway was constructed with macadam pavement and was dedicated from Lyle to Dallesport in 1934,[39] shortly before State Road 8 was re-designated as PSH 8 and the Evergreen Highway in 1937,[40] traveling east from Vancouver to Mayhill and north to Yakima.[41] SSH 8E, a branch of PSH 8, was also established in 1937 and ran east from PSH 8 in Maryhill to Paterson and north to PSH 3 in Prosser.[41][42] SSH 8E was replaced by the Maryhill–Kennewick branch of PSH 8 in 1943,[43] amidst proposals to extend the Evergreen Highway to the Tri-Cities in 1949.[44] US 197, a spur of US 97, was created in 1952 and became concurrent with US 830 and PSH 8 from the Dallesport area to a junction with its parent route in Maryhill.[45] PSH 8 was replaced fully by US 830 during the 1964 state highway renumbering,[46] but US 830 was decommissioned in 1968 before the new state routes were codified.[47][48] SR 14, previously on the route of US 12,[49] was established in 1968 and remains the designation for the Evergreen Highway.[1] The concurrency with US 197 was removed by WSDOT in 1980,[50] but was not recognized by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials until their general meeting in September 2006.[51] The eastern terminus of SR 14 was moved south from Kennewick in 1985 to an interchange with I-82 that was completed in 1981.[1][52]

Spur route[edit]


State Route 14 Spur
Location: Maryhill, Washington
Length: 0.39 mi[2] (0.63 km)
Existed: 1991–present[53]

SR 14 has a 0.39-mile-long (0.63 km) spur route in Maryhill that connects the eastbound lane of the main highway to US 97 northbound.[2][21] The spur route was established in 1991 during a re-alignment of the two highways in Maryhill and, during its annual AADT survey, WSDOT calculated that 1,400 vehicles used the highway in 2012.[23]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location Mile[2] km Exit Destinations Notes
Clark Vancouver 0.00 0.00   I‑5 – Portland, Vancouver, City Center Western terminus, continues as Washington Street and C Street
1.07 1.72 1 Southeast Columbia Way – Fort Vancouver National Historic Site
3.00 4.83 3 Evergreen Boulevard, Riverside Drive
4.36 7.02 4 Lieser Road, Southeast 88th Avenue
5.58 8.98 5 Southeast Ellsworth Road Eastbound exit and westbound entrance
6.09 9.80 6 I‑205 – Seattle, Salem
8.55 13.76 8 Southeast 164th Avenue
  9.47 15.24 10 Southeast 192nd Avenue
Camas 12.41 19.97 12 Northwest 6th Avenue – Camas City Center
Gap in freeway
14.64 23.56 14 SR 500 west (Union Street) Eastbound exit and westbound entrance
Washougal 15.02 24.17 2nd Street Eastbound entrance and westbound exit
East end of freeway
16.11 25.93   15th Street – Washougal Former SR 140 east
  18.90 30.42 Evergreen Boulevard – Washougal
Skamania   26.11 42.02 Salmon Falls Road Former SR 140 west
  41.46 66.72 Bridge of the Gods Road – Cascade Locks
Klickitat   63.43 102.08
SR 141 Spur – Trout Lake
White Salmon 64.97 104.56 Hood River Bridge Road Unsigned SR 35 south
Bingen 66.30 106.70 SR 141 north (Oak Street) – White Salmon, Trout Lake
Lyle 75.76 121.92 SR 142 east – Klickitat, Wahkiacus
  83.42 134.25 US 197 south – The Dalles
Maryhill 100.55 161.82
SR 14 Spur north to US 97
100.91 162.40 US 97 north – Goldendale, Yakima West end of US 97 overlap
101.33 163.07 US 97 south to I-84 – Bend East end of US 97 overlap
Benton Paterson 167.14 268.99 SR 221 north – Prosser
  179.85 289.44 Plymouth Road – Plymouth Former SR 143 north
  180.66 290.74 I‑82 / US 395 – Kennewick, Umatilla Eastern terminus, interchange
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing

  1. ^ a b c "47.17.060: State route No. 14". Revised Code of Washington. Washington State Legislature. 1970; revised 1985. Retrieved April 6, 2013.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  2. ^ a b c d Staff (2012). "State Highway Log: Planning Report 2012, SR 2 to SR 971" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. pp. 449–472. Retrieved April 6, 2013. 
  3. ^ "SR 5 - Exit 1A/1B: Junction SR 14" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. September 17, 2004. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  4. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2006) (PDF). Washington State Highways, 2006–07: Scenic Byways (Map). 1:842,000. http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/2432DB35-3238-4F1B-BCB7-42A981F6F2A8/0/ScenicBywaysMap.pdf. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  5. ^ "47.39.020: Designation of portions of existing highways and ferry routes as part of system.". Revised Code of Washington. Washington State Legislature. 1967; revised 1969, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 2003, 2009, 2010, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2013.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  6. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (January 2012) (PDF). 2011 Washington State Rail System (Map). http://wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/FDBE2AB4-E504-4AC5-9E30-6A2CC4FAAD34/0/2011Ownership.pdf. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  7. ^ BNSF Railway (September 1, 2011) (PDF). BNSF Subdivisions (Map). http://www.bnsf.com/customers/pdf/maps/subdivisions-map.pdf. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  8. ^ "SR 14: Junction Columbia Shores Boulevard" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. January 6, 2006. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  9. ^ "SR 14: Junction Evergreen Boulevard" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. January 24, 1995. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  10. ^ "SR 14: Junction Lieser Road" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. June 16, 2007. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  11. ^ "SR 14: Junction Ellsworth Avenue" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. June 23, 2007. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  12. ^ "SR 205 - Exit 27: Junction SR 14" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. August 30, 2007. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  13. ^ a b c Google Inc. "State Route 14". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Unknown+road&daddr=45.5633738,-122.2264275+to:45.7114817,-121.6491853+to:45.6489679,-121.1570137+to:WA-14+W&hl=en&ll=45.75889,-121.00318&spn=2.05027,5.410767&sll=45.614037,-121.350861&sspn=0.513917,1.352692&geocode=FeMnuAIdqi6w-A%3BFe09twIdBfm2-CnZWJELvZWVVDGRpvFAGCKjYQ%3BFXmAuQId38e_-CmX5B5vuwuWVDHz2OVAHL2qjQ%3BFUeMuAIda0rH-CnPQASpJB-WVDH6gzSiiowvYg%3BFdASvQId-Bfj-A&t=h&mra=dpe&mrsp=3&sz=10&via=1,2,3&z=8. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  14. ^ a b c Washington State Department of Transportation (2011) (PDF). Washington State Highways, 2011–2012 (Map). 1:842,000. http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/14A6187A-B266-4340-A351-D668F89AC231/0/TouristMapFront_withHillshade.pdf. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  15. ^ "SR 14: Junction SE 164th Avenue" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. January 7, 2010. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  16. ^ "SR 14: Junction SE 192nd Avenue" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. October 19, 2010. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  17. ^ "SR 14: Junction NW 6th Avenue/SW 6th Avenue" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. March 28, 2013. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  18. ^ "SR 14: Junction SR 500/SE Union Street" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. March 28, 2013. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  19. ^ "SR 14: Junction 2nd Street" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. March 28, 2013. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  20. ^ "47.17.132: State route No. 35". Revised Code of Washington. Washington State Legislature. 1997; revised 2006. Retrieved April 23, 2013.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  21. ^ a b "SR 14: Junction SR 14 Couplet/SR 97/SR 97 Couplet" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. September 17, 2004. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  22. ^ "SR 82 - Exit 131: Junction SR 14/McNary Road" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. July 5, 1992. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  23. ^ a b Staff (2012). "2012 Annual Traffic Report" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. pp. 90–92. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  24. ^ Federal Highway Administration (October 1, 2012). National Highway System: Washington (Map). http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/national_highway_system/nhs_maps/washington/wa_washington.pdf. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  25. ^ "What is the National Highway System?". Federal Highway Administration. September 26, 2012. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  26. ^ "Transportation Commission List of Highways of Statewide Significance". Washington State Transportation Commission. July 26, 2009. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  27. ^ Lorenzo, Judy. "Highways of Statewide Significance". Washington State Department of Transportation. 
  28. ^ Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–2014. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  29. ^ Washington State Legislature (January 26, 1905). "Chapter 7: Providing for the Establishment and Repair of Certain State Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1905 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 22. Retrieved April 23, 2013. For the building of a State wagon road in Klickitat, Skamania and Clarke Counties as follows: Beginning at Lyle in Klickitat County, Washington, and running thence westerly by the most practicable course along the north bank of the Columbia river and above high water mark, at Washougal in Clarke County, Washington, the sum of $15,000. 
  30. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 13, 1907). "Chapter 151: Providing for the Establishment, Construction and Maintenance of State Roads and Making Appropriations for Certain State Roads". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1907 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. pp. 310–311. Retrieved April 23, 2013. State Road No. 8, or the Columbia River road: This road shall begin at the town of Washougal in Clarke county, Washington, and run thence over the line as surveyed for such state road through Clarke and Skamania counties, and thence over the most practicable route to the town of Goldendale, in Klickitat county. 
  31. ^ Washington State Highway Commission (1909) (DJVU). Map of the State of Washington Showing State Roads - Located and Proposed (Map). http://www.sos.wa.gov/history/maps_detail.aspx?m=38. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  32. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 17, 1913). "Chapter 96: Establishing a Secondary Highway". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1913 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 277. Retrieved April 23, 2013. Extension of secondary highway No. 8, beginning at the town of Washougal, in Clarke county, the present western terminus of secondary highway No. 8, and extending westerly by the most feasible route to Vancover, Washington. Also commencing at the town of Goldendale, in Klickitat county, the present eastern terminus of said road, and extending the same northeasterly by the most feasible route to Mabton, in Yakima county. 
  33. ^ Washington State Bureau of Statistics and Immigration (1915) (DJVU). State of Washington Showing State Highways Authorized by Legislative Acts of 1915 (Map). http://www.sos.wa.gov/history/maps_detail.aspx?m=27. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  34. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 12, 1919). "Chapter 92: Public Highway Appropriations". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1919 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. pp. 223–226. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  35. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 19, 1923). "Chapter 185: Primary and Secondary State Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1923 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 629. Retrieved April 23, 2013. A primary state highway, to be known as State Road No. 8 or the North Bank Highway, is established as follows: Beginning at Vancouver, in Clarke County, thence by the most feasible route in an easterly direction through Stevenson, Underwood, Lyle, Maryhill; thence in a northerly direction through Goldendale to a connection with State Road No. 3 at or in the vicinity of Buena in Yakima County. 
  36. ^ Weingroff, Richard F. (January 9, 2009). "From Names to Numbers: The Origins of the U.S. Numbered Highway System". Highway History. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  37. ^ Bureau of Public Roads (November 11, 1926) (PDF). United States System of Highways (Map). OCLC 32889555. http://www.okladot.state.ok.us/hqdiv/p-r-div/maps/misc-maps/1926us.pdf. Retrieved March 17, 2013.
  38. ^ "Road Survey is Started". The Spokesman-Review. January 3, 1928. p. 6. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  39. ^ "Highway Link is Opened". The Spokesman-Review. February 13, 1934. p. 5. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  40. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 17, 1937). "Chapter 190: Establishment of Primary State Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. pp. 937–938. Retrieved April 23, 2013. A primary state highway to be known as Primary State Highway No. 8, or the Evergreen Highway, is hereby established according to description as follows: Beginning at Vancouver on Primary State Highway No. 1, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route by way of Stevenson to Goldendale, thence in a northeasterly direction by the most feasible route by way of Satus Pass to a junction with Primary State Highway No. 3, southeast of Yakima. 
  41. ^ a b Department of Highways (1939) (DJVU). Highways of the State of Washington (Map). http://www.sos.wa.gov/history/maps_detail.aspx?m=28. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  42. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 18, 1937). "Chapter 207: Classification of Public Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 1005. Retrieved April 23, 2013. Secondary State Highway No. 8E; beginning at a junction with Primary State Highway No. 8 in the vicinity south of Goldendale, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to the north of the Columbia river to Paterson, thence in a northerly direction by the most feasible route to Prosser on Primary State Highway No. 3. 
  43. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 20, 1943). "Chapter 239: Public Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1943 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 715. Retrieved April 23, 2013. There is hereby established an extension to Primary State Highway No. 8, described as follows: Beginning in the vicinity of Maryhill, running thence easterly by the most feasible route along the north bank of the Columbia river to a point in the vicinity of Plymouth, thence in a northeasterly direction to a junction with Primary State Highway No. 3 in the vicinity of Kennewick. 
  44. ^ "Campaign Opens to Extend Road to Eastern Side". Spokane Daily Chronicle. April 23, 1949. p. 3. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  45. ^ Singh, Ron (January 2007). "History of State Highways in Oregon" (PDF). Oregon Department of Transportation. pp. 89–98. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  46. ^ Prahl, C. G. (December 1, 1965). "Identification of State Highways". Washington State Highway Commission, Department of Highways. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  47. ^ United States Geological Survey (1971) (JPG). The Dalles, 1971 (Map). 1:250,000. http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/topo/250k/txu-pclmaps-topo-us-the_dalles-1971.jpg. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  48. ^ "State Approves Route Extension". Lewiston Morning Tribune. April 21, 1966. p. 12. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  49. ^ Weingroff, Richard (April 7, 2011). "U.S. 12: Michigan to Washington". Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  50. ^ Staff (1980). "Annual Traffic Report, 1980" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. p. 152. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  51. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (September 22, 2006). "An Application from the State Highway or Transportation Department of Washington for the Elimination of U.S. Route 197 (part)" (PDF). American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  52. ^ "125 Dedicate I-82 At Plymouth". Tri-City Herald. September 1, 1981. 
  53. ^ Staff (1991). "1991 Annual Traffic Report" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. p. 55. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 

External links[edit]