Washington State Route 530

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State Route 530 marker

State Route 530
Pioneer Highway
SR 530 is highlighted in red.
Route information
Auxiliary route of I-5
Defined by RCW 47.17.755
Maintained by WSDOT
Length: 50.52 mi[2] (81.30 km)
Existed: 1964[1] – present
Major junctions
West end: I‑5 near Arlington
  SR 9 in Arlington
East end: SR 20 in Rockport
Highway system
SR 529 SR 531

State Route 530 (SR 530) is a Washington state highway in Snohomish and Skagit counties. The 50.52-mile (81.30 km) long route runs northeast from an interchange with Interstate 5 (I-5) southwest of Arlington past SR 9 in Arlington and Darrington to end at SR 20 in Rockport. Serving the commuinities of Arlington, Arlington Heights, Oso, Darrington and Rockport, the roadway travels parallel to a fork of the Stillaguamish River from Arlington to Darrington, the Sauk River from Darrington to Rockport and a BNSF Railway route that extends from Arlington to Cicero, located west of Oso.

The first segment of SR 530 to appear on a map was a road extending from Arlington to Oso in 1899. The first segment to be state-maintained was Secondary State Highway 1E (SSH 1E), which ran from Conway to Arlington. SSH 1E was extended to Darrington in 1957 and later renumbered to SR 530 in 1964; the road was extended to Rockport in 1983 and later the route from Conway to I-5 was removed from the system in 1991. Since 1991, minor construction projects arranged by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) have improved the roadway and WSDOT plans to realign the highway near the Sauk River.

Route description[edit]

SR 530 at the Interstate 5 interchange southwest of Arlington

State Route 530 (SR 530) begins at a diamond interchange with Interstate 5 (I-5) southwest of Arlington, 0.78 miles (1.26 km) south of where I-5 crosses the Stillaguamish River.[2][3] After the interchange, the highway had a daily average of 22,000 motorists in 2007, which is significantly higher than in 1970 when 5,400 motorists used the stretch of road.[4][5] From the interchange, the highway is named Jackson Road and travels east to intersect Smokey Point Boulevard, which travels south to Smokey Point and was once U.S. Route 99, a major north–south road. After passing the intersection, the roadway continues east through a primarily rural area until it curves north and later east to enter Arlington city limits. Within Arlington, SR 530 intersects SR 9, another north–south highway that the road has a brief concurrency with. After the concurrency, the highway is named Burke Avenue and intersects West Avenue, which was SR 9 before it was realigned to the current western alignment. The roadway becomes the Arlington–Darrington Road after bridging the Stillaguamish River and passing the Twin Rivers County Park, the road turns northeast into Arlington Heights.[6][7][8]

A mill located on SR 530 north of Darrington

In Trafton, which is located in Arlington Heights, SR 530 passes a residential area and a road that leads to the Jim Creek Naval Radio Station, a United States Navy facility. After leaving Trafton, the road crosses a railroad track used by the BNSF Railway before crossing the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River in Cicero.[9] The highway crosses the tracks and the Stillaguamish River fork near Oso to continue east past several communities. The roadway turns southeast and passes the Darrington Municipal Airport to enter Darrington town limits. Once in Darrington, SR 530 becomes Seeman Street and goes east to an intersection with Seeman Street and Emmens Street. Emmens Street is also named the Mountain Loop Highway, which travels southwest to connect National Forest Route 20 and SR 92 in Granite Falls. At the intersection, the road turns north and leaves Darrington to follow the Sauk River. Outside of Darrington, the roadway travels north, briefly entering the boundaries of the Mount Baker National Forest and leaves Snohomish County. After entering Skagit County, SR 530 crosses the Sauk River and heads north to cross the Skagit River and end at an intersection with SR 20 in Rockport.[6][7][10]

Former route (1964–1991)[edit]

The Pioneer Highway northbound, the former alignment of SR 530 between Conway and Arlington, viewed from SR 532 in Stanwood.

From 1964 until 1991,[11][12] SR 530 began at an interchange with I-5 in Conway and traveled southeast to I-5 again at the current western terminus and then followed the current route. The former routing, now called the Pioneer Highway, followed the SeattleVancouver, BC route of the Great Northern Railway served by the International from Conway to Silvana.[9][13] The former route began at a diamond interchange with I-5 in Conway, which was also the western terminus of SR 534.[14] From the interchange, the roadway traveled west to Fir Island Road, which travels west across the South Fork of the Skagit River to Fir Island. The road then turned south to parallel railroad tracks owned by the Great Northern Railway and also parallel the South Fork of the Skagit River. At Milltown, SR 530 intersected Milltown Road, which would later interchange with I-5 to the east.[15] South of Milltown and west of Lake Ketchum, the route crossed into Snohomish County.[10] After crossing into Snohomish County and passing Lake Ketchum, SR 530 traveled south to a junction with the Old Pacific Highway and turned southeast into North Stanwood. The highway exited North Stanwood to enter Stanwood, where it intersected SR 532. The roadway curved southeast and passed Sunday Lake, some residential areas and Norman before entering Silvana. After Silvana, the road continued southeast and later eastward to interchange with I-5.[7][16]

History[edit]

Between extension of SR 530 from Darrington to SR 20 in Rockport in 1983 and the removal of the ConwayI-5 section in 1991, SR 530 ran a total of 68.34 miles (109.98 km) long.

The current route of SR 530 first appeared on a map around 1899, when a road following the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River ended east of Oso.[17] A map published in 1911 showed a road traveling from Conway southeast past Stanwood and Arlington towards Oso and Darrington.[18] The first state-maintained highway that used a section of the current roadway was Secondary State Highway 1E (SSH 1E), which was established in 1937 during the creation of the Primary and secondary highways; SSH 1E ran from an intersection with Primary State Highway 1 (PSH 1) in Conway south to what would become SSH 1Y in 1945 in Stanwood (then called East Stanwood) and east past PSH 1 again to SSH 1A in Arlington.[19][20] SSH 1E was later extended in 1957 past SSH 1A in Arlington to the Mountain Loop Highway in Darrington,[21] which had been finished by late 1941.[22][23]

During the 1964 highway renumbering, SSH 1E became SR 530,[1] SSH 1A became SR 9 and SSH 1Y became SR 532;[11][24] from 1964 until 1983, SR 530 was 49.07 miles (78.97 km) long.[5] On 26 December 1980, SR 530 was closed between Stanwood and Silvana due to a flood that caused the Stillaguamish River to overflow from its banks, which the highway parallels.[25] The roadway was extended 18.64 miles (30.00 km) north from Darrington to SR 20 in Rockport, making the highway a total of 68.34 miles (109.98 km) and both termini being in Skagit County.[2][5] SR 530 was later shortened 16.98 miles (27.33 km),[5] moving the western terminus to an interchange with I-5 southwest of Arlington.[12]

Since being shortened, five minor construction projects, arranged by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), have occurred.[26][not in citation given][27][verification needed] The confluence of the Sauk and Suiattle rivers have eroded the riverbank that supports the road north of Darrington.[28] Wilder Construction Inc. of Bellingham was hired by WSDOT to stabilize the riverbank to prevent the highway collapsing into the river.[29] The project was completed in December 2007 and took place between Darrington and Rockport.[30][31] A temporary rock wall was also constructed to protect SR 530 and will be removed once WSDOT realigns the highway north of Darrington,[32][33] which is expected to be completed after 2011.[34][35][needs update]

On March 22, 2014, a three-mile section of SR 530 in northern Snohomish County, roughly midway between Darrington and Arlington, was completely blocked by the Oso landslide. The highway was cleared enough by May 31 to open one lane of escorted traffic. Because the highway was badly damaged, and because the topography of the area had been altered by the landslide, WSDOT decided to elevate that section of the highway when it was rebuilt. As of July 27, 2014, the first of four stages in rebuilding the highway had been completed; the project is expected to be finished in early October 2014.[36]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location Mile[2] km Destinations Notes
Snohomish   0.00 0.00 I‑5 – Mount Vernon, Everett, Seattle
Pioneer Highway – Silvana, Stanwood
Western terminus; roadway continues beyond I-5 as Pioneer Highway, formerly SR 530
  0.37 0.60 Smokey Point Boulevard – Smokey Point, Marysville Former US 99
Arlington 3.84 6.18 SR 9 south (Hazel Street) – Lake Stevens, Snohomish, Maltby Western end of SR 9 concurrency
3.95 6.36 SR 9 north (Hazel Street) – Lake McMurray, Big Lake, Sedro-Woolley Eastern end of SR 9 concurrency
4.04 6.50 West Avenue
Darrington 31.88 51.31 FR 20 (Mountain Loop Highway) – Granite Falls
Skagit Rockport 50.52 81.30 SR 20 (North Cascades Highway) – Sedro-Woolley, Burlington, Okanogan Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Washington State Legislature. "RCW 47.17.755: State route No. 530". Retrieved 14 June 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d Washington State Department of Transportation (2006). "State Highway Log: Planning Report, SR 2 to SR 971". Retrieved 14 June 2009. 
  3. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (15 September 2004). "SR 5 – Exit 208; Junction SR 530 / Pioneer Highway East". Retrieved 14 June 2009. 
  4. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2007). "2007 Annual Traffic Report". Retrieved 14 June 2009. 
  5. ^ a b c d Washington State Highway Commission, Department of Highways (1970). "Annual Traffic Report, 1970". Washington State Department of Transportation. pp. 202–203. Retrieved 14 June 2009. 
  6. ^ a b Google Inc. "State Route 530". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=Jackson+Rd%2FWA-530+NE&daddr=Sauk+Valley+Rd%2FWA-530&hl=en&geocode=FclJ3wId_VS3-A%3BFZTf4wIdLKzA-A&mra=mi&mrsp=1&sz=17&sll=48.48659,-121.590328&sspn=0.005163,0.009613&ie=UTF8&ll=48.361724,-121.907043&spn=0.662439,1.230469&z=10. Retrieved 14 June 2009.
  7. ^ a b c Rand McNally (2008). King, Pierce and Snohomish Counties Street Guide (Map). 1:24,000. Thomas Guide. Cartography by NAVTEQ. p. 275, 282, 295–297, 302, 316–317, section 275: 1A, 2A, 3A, 6A, 7A; 282: 5H, 5I, 6A, 6B, 6C, 6D, 6G, 6H, 7D, 7E, 7G; 295: 1A, 2A, 2B, 3B, 3C, 4C, 4D, 4E, 4F, 4G, 4J, 5H, 5J; 296: 5A, 5B, 6B, 7A, 7B; 297: 3J, 4G, 4H, 4J, 5F, 5G, 6E, 7D, 73; 302: 1E, 1F, 1G; 316: 1A, 1B, 2B, 2C, 3C, 3D, 3E, 3F, 3G, 3H, 3J; 317: 1C, 1D, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B. ISBN 0-528-86671-0.
  8. ^ City of Arlington (26 March 2009). City of Arlington: Display Map (Map). 1 in. = 750 ft.. http://www.ci.arlington.wa.us/documents/PW%20Engineering/City_36x36_09.PDF. Retrieved 14 June 2009.
  9. ^ a b Washington State Department of Transportation (September 2008). Washington State Railroad System (Map). Cartography by United States Geological Survey. http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/1DFCBFA0-1A9D-4838-A74F-7841BF22E9C3/0/Railmap_update_Sept2008.pdf. Retrieved 14 June 2009.
  10. ^ a b G. M. Johnson (2004). Skagit Count: Mount Vernon, Anacortes (Map). City Street Maps (2004 ed.). Section F15, F16, G15, G16; AR35, AR36, AS35, AT35, AU35, AV35, AW 35, AW 36, Rockport inset. ISBN 1-894570-90-1. http://store.maplink.com/map.aspx?nav=MS&cid=10056,10078&pid=522946. Retrieved 14 June 2009.
  11. ^ a b C. G. Prahl (1 December 1965). "Identification of State Highways". Washington State Highway Commission, Department of Highways. Retrieved 4 June 2009. 
  12. ^ a b Washington House of Representatives (1991). "Chapter 342, Laws of 1991: State Highway Routes – Revisons To (House Bill 5801)". Washington State Legislature. Retrieved 20 June 2009. "Beginning at a junction with state route number 5 ((at Conway, thence southerly by way of Stanwood, thence southeasterly to a junction with state route number 5, thence easterly to a junction with state route number 9 at)) in the vicinity west of Arlington, thence easterly ((to)) and northerly by way of Darrington((, thence northerly)) to a junction with state route number 20 ((at)) in the vicinity of Rockport." 
  13. ^ General Passenger Department of the Great Northern Railway (1909). Great Northern Railway (1909) (Map). http://www.vanc.igs.net/~roughley/graphics/rail/gnr_map_1909_lrg.jpg. Retrieved 20 June 2009.
  14. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (15 September 2004). "SR 5 – Exit 221; Junction SR 534 / Pioneer Highway". Retrieved 14 June 2009. 
  15. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation. "SR 5 – Exit 218; Junction Starbird Road". Retrieved 14 June 2009. 
  16. ^ Google Inc. "Former Route of State Route 530". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=Pioneer+Hwy%2FWA-534&daddr=Pioneer+Hwy%2FWA-530+to:48.205914,-122.254143+to:Jackson+Rd%2FWA-530+NE&hl=en&geocode=Fbyg4QIdCk-1-A%3BFSxQ4AIdnAG1-A%3B%3BFctJ3wIdFVW3-A&mra=dpe&mrcr=0&mrsp=2&sz=12&via=1,2&sll=48.260341,-122.266159&sspn=0.165939,0.307617&ie=UTF8&ll=48.262398,-122.292938&spn=0.165932,0.307617&z=12. Retrieved 20 June 2009.
  17. ^ Washington State University (1899). Stillaguamish (1899) (Map). 1:125,000. Washington 1:125,000 topographic quadrangles. Cartography by United States Geological Survey. http://content.wsulibs.wsu.edu/cgi-bin/pview.exe?CISOROOT=/maps&CISOPTR=451&CISORESTMP=/qbuild/buildplate11.html&CISOVIEWTMP=/qbuild/buildplate12.html&CISOROWS=2&CISOCOLS=5&CISOCLICK=title:subjec:creato:date:type. Retrieved 14 June 2009.
  18. ^ Washington State University (1911). Mount Vernon (1911) (Map). 1:125,000. Washington 1:125,000 topographic quadrangles. Cartography by United States Geological Survey. http://content.wsulibs.wsu.edu/cgi-bin/pview.exe?CISOROOT=/maps&CISOPTR=447&CISORESTMP=/qbuild/buildplate11.html&CISOVIEWTMP=/qbuild/buildplate12.html&CISOROWS=2&CISOCOLS=5&CISOCLICK=title:subjec:creato:date:type. Retrieved 14 June 2009.
  19. ^ Washington State Legislature (18 March 1937). "Chapter 207: Classification of Public Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 edition ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 995. Retrieved 14 June 2009. "(e) Secondary State Highway No. 1E; beginning at Conway on Primary State Highway No. 1, thence in a southerly direction by the most feasible route by way of East Stanwood, thence in a southeasterly direction by the most feasible route to a junction with Primary State Highway No. 1, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to Arlington on Secondary State Highway No. 1A." 
  20. ^ Washington State Legislature (16 March 1945). "Chapter 248: Highways and Bridges Within State Parks". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1945 edition ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 729. Retrieved 14 June 2009. "There is hereby established as a branch of Primary State Highway No. 1 a secondary state highway to be known and referred to as Secondary State Highway No. 1Y as follows: Beginning at a junction with Primary State highway No. 1 in the vicinity east of East Stanwood; thence in a westerly direction by the most feasible route to a junction with Secondary State Highway 1E in the vicinity of East Stanwood; thence in a westerly direction by the most feasible route by way of Stanwood and over a bridge to a point on Camano Island known as McEachern's Corner." 
  21. ^ Washington State Legislature (1957). "Chapter 172". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1957 edition ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. Retrieved 14 June 2009. 
  22. ^ David A. Cameron (4 March 2008). "A key part of the work to build the scenic Mountain Loop Highway linking Granite Falls to Darrington (Snohomish County) begins on March 23, 1936". HistoryLink. Retrieved 14 June 2009. 
  23. ^ University of Texas at Austin (1962). Concrete, 1962 (Map). 1:250,000. http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/topo/250k/txu-pclmaps-topo-us-concrete-1962.jpg. Retrieved 14 June 2009.
  24. ^ University of Texas at Austin (1966). Victoria, 1966 (Map). 1:250,000. http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/topo/250k/txu-pclmaps-topo-us-victoria-1966.jpg. Retrieved 14 June 2009.
  25. ^ Cameron, David A. (2005). "Chapter 11: 1965–2004". Snohomish County: An Illustrated History. Index, Washington: Kelcema Books LLC. p. 346. ISBN 0-9766700-0-3. Retrieved 14 June 2009. "U.S. 2 was closed at Monroe, as was S.R. 530 between Silvana and Stanwood." 
  26. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2009). "Agency Projects: Completed Projects for SR 530". Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  27. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2009). "Agency Projects: Highway, Ferry and Rail Construction and Improvement Projects for SR 530". Retrieved 20 July 2009. 
  28. ^ Terpening, Dustin (18 June 2007). "Washout Prompts Emergency Repair on SR 20 East of Rockport; WSDOT Seeks Long-Term Solution to Erosion on SR 20, SR 530". Harrison, Todd; Drye, Jay. Washington State Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on December 30, 2009. Retrieved 14 June 2009. 
  29. ^ Terpening, Dustin (11 September 2007). "WSDOT Protects SR 530 from Collapsing into River near Darrington". Marlega, Janice. Washington State Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on December 29, 2009. Retrieved 14 June 2009. 
  30. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2007). "SR 530 – Emergency Road Protection – Darrington – Complete December 2007". Retrieved 14 June 2009. [dead link]
  31. ^ {{cite map |publisher=Washington State Department of Transportation |year=2009 |title=SR 530, Emergency Road Protection |url=http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/Projects/SR530/DarringtonEmergencyRepairs/map.htm |accessdate=14 June 2009}[dead link]}
  32. ^ Terpening, Dustin (12 December 2007). "Emergency repairs planned for SR 530 in Skagit County". Soicher, Alan. Washington State Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on December 30, 2009. Retrieved 14 June 2009. 
  33. ^ Mishler, Bronlea (30 September 2008). "Crews direct Sauk River away from SR 530 near Rockport". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved 14 June 2009. [dead link]
  34. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2009). "SR 530 – Sauk River CED Bank Erosion". Retrieved 14 June 2009. [dead link]
  35. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2005). SR 530 – Sauk River CED Bank Erosion (Map). Cartography by Tele Atlas. http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/Projects/SR530/SaukRiverRealignment/Map.htm. Retrieved 14 June 2009.[dead link]
  36. ^ "Rebuilding SR 530". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved 28 July 2014. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing