Washington Township, Burlington County, New Jersey

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Washington Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Washington
Washington Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Washington Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Washington Township, Burlington County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Washington Township, Burlington County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°41′03″N 74°34′22″W / 39.684163°N 74.572639°W / 39.684163; -74.572639Coordinates: 39°41′03″N 74°34′22″W / 39.684163°N 74.572639°W / 39.684163; -74.572639[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated November 19, 1802
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Dudley Lewis (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Kathleen D. Hoffman[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 102.706 sq mi (266.006 km2)
 • Land 99.522 sq mi (257.761 km2)
 • Water 3.184 sq mi (8.245 km2)  3.10%
Area rank 3rd of 566 in state
1st of 40 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 56 ft (17 m)
Population (2010)[7][8][9]
 • Total 687
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 684
 • Rank 547th of 566 in state
39th of 40 in county[11]
 • Density 6.9/sq mi (2.7/km2)
 • Density rank 565th of 566 in state
40th of 40 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08215 - Egg Harbor City[12]
Area code(s) 609[13]
FIPS code 3400577150[1][14][15]
GNIS feature ID 0882085[1][16]
Website www.wtbcnj.org

Washington Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 687[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 66 (+10.6%) from the 621 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 184 (-22.9%) from the 805 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

Washington was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on November 19, 1802, from portions of Evesham Township, Little Egg Harbor Township and Northampton Township (now known as Mount Holly Township, New Jersey). Portions of the township were taken to form Shamong Township (February 19, 1852), Bass River Township (March 30, 1864), Woodland Township (March 7, 1866) and Randolph Township (March 17, 1870, reannexed to Washington Township on March 28, 1893).[18]

Geography[edit]

Washington Township is located at 39°41′03″N 74°34′22″W / 39.684163°N 74.572639°W / 39.684163; -74.572639 (39.684163,-74.572639). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 102.706 square miles (266.006 km2), of which, 99.522 square miles (257.761 km2) of it was land and 3.184 square miles (8.245 km2) of it (3.10%) was water.[1][2]

Place names within Washington Township include Batsto, Bear Swamp Hill, Bridgeport, Bulltown, Crowleytown, Friendship Bogs, Green Bank, Hermon, Hog Islands, Jemima Mount, Jenkins, Jenkins Neck, Lower Bank, Mount, Penn Place, Pleasant Mills, Quaker Bridge, Tylertown and Washington.[19]

The township is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve.[20] All of the township is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Burlington County, along with areas in Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.[21]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,273
1820 1,225 −3.8%
1830 1,315 7.3%
1840 1,630 24.0%
1850 2,010 23.3%
1860 1,723 * −14.3%
1870 609 * −64.7%
1880 389 * −36.1%
1890 310 −20.3%
1900 617 99.0%
1910 597 −3.2%
1920 500 −16.2%
1930 478 −4.4%
1940 518 8.4%
1950 566 9.3%
1960 541 −4.4%
1970 673 24.4%
1980 808 20.1%
1990 805 −0.4%
2000 621 −22.9%
2010 687 10.6%
Est. 2013 684 [10][22] −0.4%
Population sources:1810-2000[23]
1810-1920[24] 1840[25] 1850-1870[26]
1850[27] 1870[28] 1880-1890[29]
1890-1910[30] 1910-1930[31]
1930-1990[32] 2000[33][34] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[18]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 687 people, 256 households, and 177.9 families residing in the township. The population density was 6.9 per square mile (2.7/km2). There were 284 housing units at an average density of 2.9 per square mile (1.1/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.89% (645) White, 1.89% (13) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 0.15% (1) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 3.64% (25) from other races, and 0.44% (3) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 9.02% (62) of the population.[7]

There were 256 households, of which 25.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.5% were married couples living together, 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.16.[7]

In the township, 18.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 11.5% from 18 to 24, 21.7% from 25 to 44, 33.5% from 45 to 64, and 15.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.9 years. For every 100 females there were 106.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.5 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $96,250 (with a margin of error of +/- $21,869) and the median family income was $108,239 (+/- $9,762). Males had a median income of $19,946 (+/- $15,879) versus $41,250 (+/- $4,961) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,808 (+/- $10,822). About 0.0% of families and 21.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[35]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 621 people, 160 households, and 112 families residing in the township. The population density was 6.2 people per square mile (2.4/km²). There were 171 housing units at an average density of 1.7 per square mile (0.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 83.57% White, 2.90% African American, 0.32% Asian, 12.08% from other races, and 1.13% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.07% of the population.[33][34]

There were 160 households out of which 35.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.3% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.4% were non-families. 24.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.27.[33][34]

In the township the population was spread out with 29.3% under the age of 18, 3.5% from 18 to 24, 23.8% from 25 to 44, 19.0% from 45 to 64, and 24.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.8 males.[33][34]

The median income for a household in the township was $41,250, and the median income for a family was $42,188. Males had a median income of $32,000 versus $31,719 for females. The per capita income for the township was $13,977. About 8.0% of families and 16.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.4% of those under age 18 and 13.9% of those age 65 or over.[33][34]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Washington Township is governed under the Township form of government with a three-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor.

As of 2014, the members of the Washington Township Council are Mayor Dudley Lewis (R, term ends December 31, 2016), Barry F. Cavileer (R, 2015) and Daniel L. James (R, 2014).[3][36][37][38][39]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Washington Township is located in the 2nd Congressional District[40] and is part of New Jersey's 9th state legislative district.[8][41][42]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[44][45] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[46][47]

For the 2014-15 Session, the 9th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher J. Connors (R, Lacey Township) and in the General Assembly by DiAnne Gove (R, Long Beach Township) and Brian E. Rumpf (R, Little Egg Harbor Township).[48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[51] The board chooses a director and deputy director from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[51] As of 2014, Burlington County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce Garganio (R, 2014; Florence Township),[52] Deputy Director Joseph Howarth (R, 2014; Evesham Township)[53] Aimee Belgard (D, 2015; Edgewater Park Township),[54] Joseph B. Donnelly (R, 2016; Cinnaminson Township)[55] and Joanne Schwartz (D, 2015; Southampton Township).[56][51][57] Gargiano was named in March 2014 to serve the unexpired term of Leah Arter and was chosen to fill her position as Freeholder Director.[58]

Education[edit]

The Washington Township School District serves students in public school for pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade at Green Bank Elementary School. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 45 students and 5.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 7.63:1.[59] The school's $5.4 million building opened in September 2006.[60]

Since the 2007-08 school year, as part of an agreement with the Mullica Township Schools, Washington Township receives teaching support from the Mullica district and shares its superintendent, business administrator and other support staff. Washington Township students in grades five through eight attend Mullica Township Middle School as part of a program that has expanded since it was initiated in the 2007-08 school year.[61][62][63][64]

Students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Cedar Creek High School, which is located in the northern section of Egg Harbor City and opened to students in September 2010.[65] The school is one of three high schools operated as part of the Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District, which also includes the constituent municipalities of Egg Harbor City, Galloway Township, Hamilton Township, and Mullica Township, and participates in sending/receiving relationships with Port Republic and Washington Township.[66][67] Cedar Creek High School is zoned to serve students from Egg Harbor City, Mullica Township, Port Republic and Washington Township, while students in portions of Galloway and Hamilton townships have the can attend Cedar Creek as an option or to participate in magnet programs at the school.[68][69] Prior to the opening of Cedar Creek, students from Washington Township had attended Oakcrest High School, together with students from Hamilton Township, Mullica Township and Port Republic.[70]

Students from Washington Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[71]

Transportation[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 54.31 miles (87.40 km) of roadways, of which 29.32 miles (47.19 km) were maintained by the municipality and 24.99 miles (40.22 km) by Burlington County.[72]

The only major roads that pass through are County Road 542 and County Road 563.

Limited access roads are accessible in neighboring communities, including the Atlantic City Expressway in Hammonton and the Garden State Parkway in Galloway Township, Port Republic and Bass River Township.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Governing Body, Washington Township, Burlington County. Accessed October 30,2014.
  4. ^ Directory, Washington Township, Burlington County. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 49.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Washington, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Washington township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 6. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Washington township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 11, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Egg Harbor City, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Washington, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 30, 2014.
  14. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  16. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  18. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 99. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  19. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  20. ^ The Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey Pinelands Commission. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  21. ^ Pinelands Municipalities, New Jersey Pinelands Commission, April 2003. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  22. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2014.
  23. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 22, 2013.
  25. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 22, 2013.
  26. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 265, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 22, 2013. "Washington township was formed from Northampton, Evesham and Little Egg Harbor. Pleasant Mills and Green Bank are post towns. Crowleytown, Washington, and Quaker Bridge are also in this township. It contains an extensive cranberry swamp. There are also large quantities of bog iron ore. The population in 1850 was 2,009; in 1860, 1,008; and in 1870, 1,149." The population for 1850 is one less than the value listed, with much larger discrepancies for 1860 and 1870.
  27. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 137. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 22, 2013.
  28. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 22, 2013.
  29. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 22, 2013.
  30. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  31. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  32. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  33. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Washington township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  34. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Washington township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  35. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Washington township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  36. ^ 2012 Municipal Data Sheet, Washington Township, Burlington County. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  37. ^ Staff. "Democrats Belgard, Schwartz lead Burlington County freeholder race", Asbury Park Press, November 6, 2012. Accessed October 24, 2013. "Washington Township Committee (0)REP - Barry Cavileer 254 98.07%"
  38. ^ November 6, 2012 Summary Report Burlington County Amended Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  39. ^ November 8, 2011 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  40. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 66, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  44. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  46. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  47. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 24, 2014.
  49. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  51. ^ a b c Staff. Board of Chosen Freeholders, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  52. ^ Bruce Garganio, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  53. ^ Joseph Howarth, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  54. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  55. ^ Joseph B. Donnelly, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  56. ^ Joanne Schwartz, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  57. ^ 2014 County Data Sheet, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  58. ^ Hefler, Jan. "Garganio again to head Burlco Freeholder Board", The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 29, 2014. Accessed July 27, 2014. "The new director of the Burlington County Freeholder Board is Bruce Garganio, a Republican who led the five-member board for three years before he was defeated in his bid for reelection in November 2011.... Two weeks ago, the county Republican Committee tapped Garganio to fill the one-year vacancy that was created after Leah Arter resigned as freeholder director."
  59. ^ District information for Washington Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 30, 2014.
  60. ^ Procida, Lee. "Washington Township's Green Bank Elementary School fights to survive funding cut", The Press of Atlantic City, November 20, 2010. Accessed April 8, 2011. "The Green Bank Elementary School opened its doors only four years ago, but residents already fear it may close as funding for the tiny school district dwindles. When the $5.4 million building opened in 2006, it became the center of this rural Burlington County community, its bright white exterior and green trim a striking contrast to the decrepit structures students used previously."
  61. ^ Washington Township School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 30, 2014. "Washington Township is continuing its shared services relationship with the Mullica Township School District. Administrative Staff, Business Office, Child Study Team, and Food Services personnel are shared by each district. This has resulted in substantial savings to both communities. The districts are also collaborating on staff development and special programs for students. Washington Township and Mullica Township students for example, take field trips together and currently grades 4th – 8th students attend Mullica Township Middle School."
  62. ^ Mullica Township School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 30, 2014. "In addition, Mullica Township currently has a shared service agreement with Washington Township School District (Green Bank School). This shared service agreement includes administrative services and child study team services, as well as a send-receive relationship with Mullica Township Middle School and Green Bank students in 5th thru 8th grade. This send-receive agreement provides Green Bank students the benefit of a well-rounded middle school experience."
  63. ^ Procida, Lee. "Washington Township's Green Bank Elementary School fights to survive funding cut", The Press of Atlantic City, November 20, 2010. Accessed October 30, 2014. "Washington Township currently shares its superintendent, Brenda Harring-Marro, as well as several teachers and staff, with Mullica. This year, the 23 students from sixth, seventh and eighth grades started going to Mullica’s middle school, six miles south across the Mullica River."
  64. ^ Shared Services, Mullica Township School District. Accessed October 30, 2014. "During the 2010-2011 school year we embarked on a new level of shared services in that the sixth thru eighth (6-8) grade students from Green Bank attend Mullica’s middle school. The transition allows the students from Green Bank to experience a larger school setting prior to entering high school."
  65. ^ Cedar Creek High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 30, 2014. "Cedar Creek High School opened its doors for the first time September 7, 2010 with only 9th and 10th grade students. For the 2011/2012 school year, we grew to include grades 9 through 11. Serving students from six communities within the Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District, Cedar Creek will function fully as a four-year, comprehensive high school for the 2012/2013 school year."
  66. ^ Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 30, 2014. "The Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District serves the communities of Galloway Township, Hamilton Township, Egg Harbor City, Mullica Township and participates in receiving relationships with Port Republic and Washington Township."
  67. ^ High School Sending Districts, Burlington County Library System, backed up by the Internet Archive as of September 27, 2006. Accessed October 30, 2014.
  68. ^ Student Population, Cedar Creek High School. Accessed October 30, 2014. "We will serve as the high school for the communities of Mullica Township, Egg Harbor City, Port Republic, and the Green Bank area of Washington Township. Students from specific geographic areas of Galloway and Hamilton Townships (School of Choice Program) and the entirety of Galloway and Hamilton Townships through the Magnet Programs (Engineering and Environmental Sciences) will have the option of attending CCHS."
  69. ^ Policy 5120 Assignment of Pupils, Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District. Accessed October 30, 2014. "Pupils shall attend the school located in the attendance area of their residence. The attendance areas for the Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District shall be as follows: 1. Pupils who reside in Egg Harbor City shall attend Cedar Creek High School. 2. Pupils who reside in Galloway Township shall attend Absegami High School. 3. Pupils who reside in Hamilton Township shall attend Oakcrest High School 4. Pupils who reside in Mullica Township shall attend Cedar Creek High School 5. Pupils who reside in Port Republic and Washington Township shall attend Cedar Creek High School."
  70. ^ Oakcrest High School 2010 report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education, backed up by the Internet Archive as of June 14, 2012. Accessed October 30, 2014. "Oakcrest is a comprehensive high school located in Mays Landing that provides a secondary school education to four sending districts including Greenbank, Hamilton Township, Mullica Township, and Port Republic."
  71. ^ Why Choose BCIT?, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  72. ^ Burlington County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed December 2, 2013.

External links[edit]