Washington Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other places with the same name, see Washington Township, New Jersey (disambiguation).
Washington Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Washington
Official seal of Washington Township, New Jersey
Seal
Nickname(s): Township
Washington Township highlighted in Gloucester County. Inset map: Gloucester County highlighted in the State of New Jersey
Washington Township highlighted in Gloucester County. Inset map: Gloucester County highlighted in the State of New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Washington Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Washington Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°44′54″N 75°04′09″W / 39.748424°N 75.069092°W / 39.748424; -75.069092Coordinates: 39°44′54″N 75°04′09″W / 39.748424°N 75.069092°W / 39.748424; -75.069092[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Gloucester
Incorporated February 17, 1836
Government[5]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor Barbara A. Wallace (D, term ends December 31, 2016)[3]
 • Clerk Mary Lou Bergh[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 21.600 sq mi (55.944 km2)
 • Land 21.382 sq mi (55.379 km2)
 • Water 0.218 sq mi (0.565 km2)  1.01%
Area rank 130th of 566 in state
4th of 24 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 115 ft (35 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 48,559
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 48,158
 • Rank 37th of 566 in state
1st of 24 in county[11]
 • Density 2,271.0/sq mi (876.8/km2)
 • Density rank 268th of 566 in state
9th of 24 in county[11]
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-5)
ZIP codes Blackwood - 08012[12]
Glassboro - 08028[13]
Grenloch - 08032[14]
Pitman - 08071[15]
Sicklerville - 08081[16]
Sewell - 08080[17][18]
Area code(s) 856
FIPS code 3401577180[19][2][20]
GNIS feature ID 0882140[21][2]
Website www.twp.washington.nj.us

Washington Township is a township in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. In the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 48,559,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 1,445 (+3.1%) from the 47,114 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 5,154 (+12.3%) from the 41,960 counted in the 1990 Census.[22]

Washington Township was incorporated by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 17, 1836, from portions of Deptford Township. The Township officially moved to the newly created Camden County on March 13, 1844. Monroe Township was created on March 3, 1859, from part of the township. Most of Washington Township, along with all of Monroe Township, was moved back into Gloucester County on February 28, 1871, with the remaining portions of Washington Township that were still in Camden County being transferred to Gloucester Township. Additional transfers to Gloucester Township were made in 1926 and 1931.[23]

In 2008, CNN/Money and Money Magazine ranked Washington Township 58th on its list of the 100 Best Cities to Live in the United States.[24]

Turnersville (with a 2010 Census population of 3,742[25]) is a census-designated place and unincorporated community located within Washington Township.[26]

History[edit]

The oldest community in Washington Township, Grenloch Terrace, was a thriving Lenape Native American village called Tetamekon. Some of the early settlers to the area were the Collins family of Chestnut Ridge Farm, for whom Chestnut Ridge Middle School is named; the Turner family, for whom Turnersville was named; the Hurff family, for whom Hurffville and Hurffville Elementary School are named; the Heritage family, whose family began the Heritage's Dairy Farm Stores, and for whom the community Heritage Valley is named; the Morgan family, who were the first residents of the Olde Stone House, a landmark for residents of the Township; and the Bell Family, who arrived in 1899 and for whom Bells Lake Park and Bells Elementary School are named. Sewell, New Jersey, is named after General William Joyce Sewell, who was elected to the United States Senate in 1881 and 1895, and served as President of the New Jersey Senate in 1876, 1879 and 1880.[27][28]

Geography[edit]

Washington Township is located at 39°44′54″N 75°04′09″W / 39.748424°N 75.069092°W / 39.748424; -75.069092 (39.748424,-75.069092). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 21.600 square miles (55.944 km2), of which, 21.382 square miles (55.379 km2) of it is land and 0.218 square miles (0.565 km2) of it (1.01%) is water.[1][2]

The township borders Deptford Township, Mantua Township, Pitman, Glassboro, Monroe Township, Williamstown and Camden County

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 1,545
1850 2,114 36.8%
1860 1,307 * −38.2%
1870 1,567 19.9%
1880 1,366 −12.8%
1890 1,155 −15.4%
1900 1,252 8.4%
1910 1,396 11.5%
1920 1,460 4.6%
1930 2,068 41.6%
1940 2,048 −1.0%
1950 2,496 21.9%
1960 4,923 97.2%
1970 15,741 219.7%
1980 27,878 77.1%
1990 41,960 50.5%
2000 47,114 12.3%
2010 48,559 3.1%
Est. 2012 48,158 [10] −0.8%
Population sources:
1840 and 1880-2000[29] 1850-1870[30]
1840-1920[31] 1840[32] 1850-1870[33]
1850[34] 1870[35] 1880-1890[36]
1890-1910[37] 1910-1930[38]
1930-1990[39] 2000[40][41] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[23]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 48,559 people, 17,287 households, and 13,328 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,271.0 per square mile (876.8 /km2). There were 17,810 housing units at an average density of 833.0 per square mile (321.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 87.70% (42,588) White, 5.82% (2,825) Black or African American, 0.11% (52) Native American, 3.78% (1,836) Asian, 0.02% (9) Pacific Islander, 0.85% (415) from other races, and 1.72% (834) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.65% (1,774) of the population.[7]

There were 17,287 households, of which 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.4% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.9% were non-families. 19.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.23.[7]

In the township, 24.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 23.5% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.6 years. For every 100 females there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.0 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $79,017 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,281) and the median family income was $94,585 (+/- $3,639). Males had a median income of $62,702 (+/- $2,103) versus $46,628 (+/- $2,959) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $33,038 (+/- $1,285). About 2.6% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.3% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.[42]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[19] there were 47,114 people, 15,609 households, and 12,658 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,204.6 people per square mile (851.2/km²). There were 16,020 housing units at an average density of 749.6/sq mi (289.4/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 90.20% White, 4.85% African American, 0.08% Native American, 3.31% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.53% from other races, and 1.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.03% of the population.[40][41]

There were 15,609 households out of which 43.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.3% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.9% were non-families. 15.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.00 and the average family size was 3.38.[40][41]

In the township the population was spread out with 28.7% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 29.6% from 25 to 44, 24.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males.[40][41]

The median income for a household in the township was $66,546, and the median income for a family was $74,661. Males had a median income of $51,319 versus $35,018 for females. The per capita income for the township was $25,705. About 2.5% of families and 3.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.2% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.[40][41]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Washington Township is governed under the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) by the Mayor-Council system of New Jersey municipal government (Plan 2), implemented based on direct petition as of January 1, 1985.[43] The township is governed by a Mayor and a five-member Municipal Council. The Mayor is elected by township voters and is the Chief Executive in charge of the administrative functions of the town. Members of the Township Council are elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections held as part of the November general election. All elected officials serve four-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with the mayor and two council seats up for election in leap years and the other three council seats up for vote two years later.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Washington Township is Barbara A. Wallace (D, term ends December 31, 2016).[44] Members of the Township Council are Council President Daniel Morley (R, 2014), Council Vice-President Giancarlo D'Orazio (R, 2014), Chris Del Borrello (R, 2014), Michelle Martin (D, 2016) and Scott Newman (D, 2016).[45][46][47][48]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Washington Township is located in the 1st Congressional District[49] and is part of New Jersey's 4th state legislative district.[8][50][51]

The seat for New Jersey's First Congressional District is currently vacant, having formerly been represented by Rob Andrews (D, Haddon Heights), who resigned on February 18, 2014.[52] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[53][54] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[55][56]

The 4th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Fred H. Madden (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and in the General Assembly by Paul Moriarty (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and Gabriela Mosquera (D, Gloucester Township).[57] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[58] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[59]

Gloucester County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis in partisan elections, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At a reorganization meeting held each January, the Board selects a Freeholder Director and a Deputy Freeholder Director from among its members. As of 2013, Gloucester County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Robert M. Damminger (D, West Deptford Township; term ends 2015),[60] Deputy Freeholder Director Giuseppe "Joe" Chila (D, Woolwich Township; 2015),[61] Lyman J. Barnes (D, Logan Township; 2014),[62] Vincent H. Nestore, Jr. (R, Deptford Township; 2013),[63] Heather Simmons (D, Glassboro; 2014),[64] Adam Taliaferro (D, Woolwich Township; 2014)[65] and Larry Wallace (R, Woolwich Township; 2013).[66][67] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk James N. Hogan,[68] Surrogate Helene M. Reed (Monroe Township)[69] and Sheriff Carmel Morina (Greenwich Township).[70][71]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 33,934 registered voters in Washington, of which 11,872 (35.0%) were registered as Democrats, 7,763 (22.9%) were registered as Republicans and 14,279 (42.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 20 voters registered to other parties.[72]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 49.6% of the vote here (12,815 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 48.6% (12,570 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (268 votes), among the 25,859 ballots cast by the township's 35,224 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.4%.[73] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 50.9% of the vote here (12,805 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 48.0% (12,082 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (163 votes), among the 25,149 ballots cast by the township's 33,043 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.1.[74]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 52.6% of the vote here (7,789 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 38.8% (5,757 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.0% (1,043 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (79 votes), among the 14,820 ballots cast by the township's 34,338 registered voters, yielding a 43.2% turnout.[75]

Education[edit]

The Washington Township Public School District serves students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[76]) are Grenloch Terrace Early Childhood Center[77] (583 students) for Kindergarten; Bells Elementary School[78] (397), Birches Elementary School[79] (363), Hurffville Elementary School[80] (382), Thomas Jefferson Elementary School[81] (320), Wedgewood Elementary School[82] (347) and Whitman Elementary School[83] (390) for grades 1-5; Bunker Hill Middle School[84] (776), Chestnut Ridge Middle School[85] (679) and Orchard Valley Middle School[86] for grades 6-8; and Washington Township High School[87] with 2,688 students in grades 9 - 12.[88]

Local dynamics[edit]

Washington Township has two major economic centers. The "town center" is focused around the square formed by Greentree Road, Egg Harbor Road, Ganttown Road, and Hurffville-Crosskeys Road. Washington Township High School, the TD Bank Arts Centre, Washington Lake Park, and the township municipal building are located around this general vicinity. The other major center is located around Route 42, which connects Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to the Jersey Shore.

Washington Township is sometimes referred to as "South Philly South" or "Little South Philly" as a large percentage of its citizens moved to the town from the Italian South Philadelphia region over the past several decades.[89] It is also known simply as "Township".[90]

Recent expansion[edit]

Washington Township could be viewed as the frontline between open space and home developers. A township that was once composed of several housing projects gravitating around the Wedgwood, Whitman Square, Birches, Birches West, and Hurffville neighborhoods has expanded outwards.[citation needed]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The township had a total of 199.78 miles (321.51 km) of roadways, of which 154.61 miles (248.82 km) are maintained by the municipality, 35.72 miles (57.49 km) by Gloucester County, 8.36 miles (13.45 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 1.09 miles (1.75 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[91]

Route 42 (Black Horse Pike) heads along the west side of the township, entering in the south from Monroe Township and continuing north for 4 miles (6.4 km) towards Gloucester Township in Camden County, where the road is known as the North-South Freeway.[92] Route 168 (also known as Black Horse Pike) has its southern terminus at Route 42 in Washington Township and heads north along the township border towards Gloucester Township.[93] Route 47 (Delsea Drive) runs along the eastern quarter of the township, entering in the south from Glassboro and proceeding north for 3.2 miles (5.1 km) towards Deptford Township.[94] Route 55 clips the eastern tip of Gloucester Township, extending for 0.4 miles (0.64 km) from Mantua Township in the south to Deptford Township in the north.[95] The Atlantic City Expressway enters from Gloucester Township, and zig-zags through both until its western terminus in Washington Township at Route 42.[96][18]

County Route 534 (Good Intent Road) enters from Deptford Township on the east and heads into Gloucester Township.[97] County Route 555 (Tuckahoe Road) enters from Monroe Township on the west and continues for 1.1 miles (1.8 km) to its terminus at Route 42.[98]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit's Atlantic City commuter rail line and PATCO Speedline rapid transit are accessible at the Lindenwold (NJT station), located 10 miles (16 km) northeast of the township.[18]

NJ Transit bus service is available to Philadelphia on the 315, 400, 403 and 408 routes, with local service on the 463 route.[99][100]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Washington Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 20, 2013. As of date accessed, Wallace is listed as mayor with an incorrect term-end date of December 31, 2015.
  4. ^ Clerk's Office, Washington Township, Gloucester County. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 24.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Washington, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Washington township, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 3. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Washington township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Blackwood, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Glassboro, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Grenloch, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Pitman, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  16. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Sicklerville, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  17. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Sewell, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  18. ^ a b c Community Information, Washington Township, Gloucester County. Accessed August 15, 2011.
  19. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 31, 2012.
  21. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  22. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  23. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 140. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  24. ^ Staff. "Best Places to Live 2008: #58. Washington, NJ", CNNMoney.com. Accessed August 15, 2011.
  25. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Turnersville CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  26. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  27. ^ History of Washington Township, Washington Township. Accessed August 15, 2011.
  28. ^ William Joyce Sewell, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 15, 2011.
  29. ^ Barnett, Bob. "Population Data for Gloucester County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  30. ^ Barnett, Bob. "Population Data for Camden County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  31. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  32. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  33. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 279, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed November 10, 2013. "Washington contained in 1850, a population of 2,114; in 1860, 1,307; and in 1870, 1,567. These two townships [including Monroe township] were set off from Camden county and annexed to Gloucester, February 28th, 1871."
  34. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 138. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  35. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 258. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  36. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  37. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  38. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  39. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  40. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Washington township, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  41. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Washington township, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  42. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Washington township, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  43. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  44. ^ Mayor's Office, Washington Township, Gloucester County. Accessed May 20, 2013.
  45. ^ Meet Your Township Council, Washington Township, Gloucester County. Accessed May 20, 2013.
  46. ^ 2010 General Election November 2, 2010 Summary Report, Gloucester County, New Jersey, dated August 8, 2012. Accessed May 20, 2013.
  47. ^ 2012 General Election November 6, 2012 Summary Report, Gloucester County, New Jersey, dated November 28, 2012. Accessed May 20, 2012.
  48. ^ Caffrey, Michelle. "Democrats Wallace, Newman and Martin come out on top in Washington Township", Washington Township Times, November 6, 2012. Accessed May 20, 2013. "Mayor Barbara Wallace (12,433) defeated Republican Council President Daniel Morley (10,404) for the mayoral seat. Residents will also see some familiar faces on council, as incumbent Democrat Councilman Scott Newman (12,039) and former Councilwoman Michelle Martin, also a Democrat, (11,969) won the two council seats up for election over Republican candidates Kevin Murphy (10,626) and Tahir Mella (10,087).... Republicans will still hold the majority on township council, however, with Republicans Council Vice President Chris Del Borrello, Councilman Giancarlo D’Orazio and Morley only two years into their first terms in office."
  49. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  50. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 66, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  51. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  52. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  53. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  54. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  55. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  56. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  57. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 16, 2014.
  58. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  59. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  60. ^ Robert M. Damminger, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  61. ^ Giuseppe (Joe) Chila, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  62. ^ Lyman Barnes, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  63. ^ Vincent H. Nestore, Jr., Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  64. ^ Heather Simmons, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  65. ^ Adam J. Taliaferro, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  66. ^ Larry Wallace, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  67. ^ Board of Freeholders, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  68. ^ James N. Hogan, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  69. ^ Surrogate Helene M. Reed, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  70. ^ Sheriff Carmel M. Morina, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  71. ^ Row Officers, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  72. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Gloucester, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  73. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Gloucester County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  74. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Gloucester County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  75. ^ 2009 Governor: Gloucester County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 8, 2012.
  76. ^ Data for the Washington Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  77. ^ Grenloch Terrace Early Childhood Center, Washington Township Public School District. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  78. ^ Bells Elementary School, Washington Township Public School District. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  79. ^ Birches Elementary School, Washington Township Public School District. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  80. ^ Hurffville Elementary School, Washington Township Public School District. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  81. ^ Thomas Jefferson Elementary School, Washington Township Public School District. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  82. ^ Wedgewood Elementary School, Washington Township Public School District. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  83. ^ Whitman Elementary School, Washington Township Public School District. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  84. ^ Bunker Hill Middle School, Washington Township Public School District. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  85. ^ Chestnut Ridge Middle School, Washington Township Public School District. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  86. ^ Orchard Valley Middle School, Washington Township Public School District. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  87. ^ Washington Township High School, Washington Township Public School District. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  88. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Washington Township Public School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  89. ^ Fifield, Adam. "Rival Washington Township, Pa., Cannoli Makers Square Off.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 5, 2003. Accessed October 21, 2007. "WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP, Pa. -- Is there room in this town for more than one cannoli?... And in a Gloucester County community nicknamed "South Philly South" for its large population of Italian American city transplants, it has earned a loyalty thicker than ricotta."
  90. ^ Fifield, Adam. "Where passion, pride connect", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 16, 2004. Accessed October 21, 2007. "Washington Township may not rank as a big draw for Sunday drivers. If you're passing through, spinning along the strip malls and housing developments and fast-food chains, you may feel compelled to keep your foot on the gas until more appealing scenery rolls by. But this is a town where much of the allure runs more than soil- or asphalt-deep. Gloucester County's largest community, known to some as South Philly South and to many simply as Township, often shortened by residents to "Twp"..."
  91. ^ Gloucester County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  92. ^ Route 42 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, April 2008. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  93. ^ Route 168 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, April 2009. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  94. ^ Route 47 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, March 2008. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  95. ^ Route 55 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, January 2009. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  96. ^ Atlantic City Expressway Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, January 1997. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  97. ^ County Route 534 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, March 2007. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  98. ^ County Route 534 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, October 2006. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  99. ^ Gloucester County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  100. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 10, 2013.
  101. ^ Minnick, Kevin. "D'Imperio goes to Vikings", Courier Post, April 25, 2010. Accessed September 24, 2012. "Ryan D'Imperio talked to a few teams leading up to the NFL Draft. The 2006 Washington Township High School graduate also worked out for a few teams."
  102. ^ Ryan D'Imperio, Minnesota Vikings. Accessed May 22, 2011.
  103. ^ Donahue, Deirdre. "Leggy Linda Fiorentino says Gotcha! to some of the silver screen's cutest virgin hunks.", People (magazine), May 27, 1985. "Growing up in South Philly and later Turnersville, N.J. gave Linda a street-kid sensibility."
  104. ^ Beym, Jessica. "'King Kong Bundy' lends hand to Washington Township fundraiser", Gloucester County Times, January 31, 2010. Accessed February 17, 2011. "Bundy whose real name is Chris Pallies, a Washington Township High School grad in 1974 made an appearance in his former hometown Friday afternoon to help support a good cause."
  105. ^ Rubenstein, Jenna "Video Premiere: I Call Fives, ‘Late Nights’", MTV, September 8, 2012. "from Washington Township, NJ."
  106. ^ via Associated Press. "GOLDEN GIRL CHEERS FROM HER N.J. HOME TOWN CHEERING TARA \ HER N.J. HOME TOWN SALUTES CHAMP", Philadelphia Daily News, February 21, 1998. Accessed August 12, 2008.
  107. ^ Assemblyman Gerald J. Luongo, New Jersey Legislature, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 25, 1998. Accessed June 10, 2010.
  108. ^ Quann, Peg. "Palmyra family joining NephCure Walk", Burlington County Times, October 11, 2013. Accessed November 10, 2013. "State Sen. Fred H. Madden Jr., D-4th of Washington, Gloucester County, will serve as honorary chairman of the walk."
  109. ^ Hefler, Jan. "Mayor target in mayoral race Paul Moriarty has drawn criticism from both candidates for his office in Washington Twp.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 13, 2008. Accessed November 10, 2013. "Republican candidate Theresa Lappe wants to raise a number of issues in the hotly contested race for Washington Township mayor. But each time she criticizes the all-Democratic local government, her opponent agrees with her.That's because Democrat Matt Lyons is trying to distance himself from lame-duck Mayor Paul Moriarty, whose popularity in Gloucester County's most populous municipality has plummeted since he was elected in 2004."
  110. ^ McGowan, Deane. "Lopez Stops Rossman in Six Rounds", The New York Times, March 3, 1978. Accessed November 10, 2013. "Mike Rossman of Turnersville, N.J., is a tough fighter, but Yaqui Lopez of Stockton, Calif., was even tougher last night."
  111. ^ Servalli, Frank. "Kings' Stevens enjoys reunion", The Philadelphia Inquirer, December 31, 2010. Accessed October 23, 2011. "Sometime after watching the team he coached earlier in the year lose in the Stanley Cup finals last June, John Stevens was relaxing at his shore house in Sea Isle City when he received a call.... From a father's perspective, Los Angeles is 2,873 miles from his home base in Washington Township, N.J. For a tight-knit family man like Stevens, 44, who would be forced to leave his wife Stacy and hockey-loving sons John and Nolan behind, the decision wasn't an easy one."
  112. ^ Shyrock, Bob. "Bob Shryock: He got the blame for hitting slump", South Jersey Times, July 27, 2010. Accessed November 10, 2013. "Thompson is the same Washington Township resident — and 1993 World Series RBI specialist — who was given major kudos for the hit machine that was the 2008 World Champs and 2009 National League pennant winners."
  113. ^ Chappelear, Scott. "Washington Township native John Yurkow named head coach at Penn", South Jersey Times, July 14, 2013. Accessed November 10, 2013. "“There are recruits who we’ve been working with for months,” said Yurkow, a Gloucester Catholic High School graduate and Washington Township native."

External links[edit]