Washington statistical areas

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The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs),[1] the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs),[2] and the combined statistical areas (CSAs)[3] currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Most recently on December 1, 2009, the Office of Management and Budget defined 1067 statistical areas for the United States,[4] including 1 combined statistical area, 12 metropolitan statistical areas, and 9 micropolitan statistical areas in the State of Washington. The table below shows the recent population of these statistical areas and the 39 counties of Washington.

An enlargeable map of the 39 counties of the State of Washington

Table[edit]

The table below describes the 22 United States statistical areas and 39 counties of the State of Washington with the following information:[5]

  1. The combined statistical area (CSA) as designated by the OMB.[4]
  2. The CSA population as of April 1, 2010, as enumerated by the 2010 United States Census.[6]
  3. The core based statistical area (CBSA)[7] as designated by the OMB.[4]
  4. The CBSA population as of April 1, 2010, as enumerated by the 2010 United States Census.[6]
  5. The county name.[6]
  6. The county population as of April 1, 2010, as enumerated by the 2010 United States Census.[6]
The 22 United States statistical areas and 39 counties of the State of Washington

Combined Statistical Area 2010 Census Core Based Statistical Area 2010 Census County 2010 Census
Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia, WA CSA 4,199,312 Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA MSA 3,439,809 King County, Washington 1,931,249
Pierce County, Washington 795,225
Snohomish County, Washington 713,335
Olympia, WA MSA 252,264 Thurston County, Washington 252,264
Bremerton-Silverdale, WA MSA 251,133 Kitsap County, Washington 251,133
Mount Vernon-Anacortes, WA MSA 116,901 Skagit County, Washington 116,901
Oak Harbor, WA μSA 78,506 Island County, Washington 78,506
Shelton, WA μSA 60,699 Mason County, Washington 60,699
none Spokane, WA MSA 471,221 Spokane County, Washington 471,221
Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, OR-WA MSA 2,226,009
436,429
Multnomah County, Oregon 735,334
Washington County, Oregon 529,710
Clark County, Washington 425,363
Clackamas County, Oregon 375,992
Yamhill County, Oregon 99,193
Columbia County, Oregon 49,351
Skamania County, Washington 11,066
Kennewick-Pasco-Richland, WA MSA 253,340 Benton County, Washington 175,177
Franklin County, Washington 78,163
Yakima, WA MSA 243,231 Yakima County, Washington 243,231
Bellingham, WA MSA 201,140 Whatcom County, Washington 201,140
Wenatchee, WA MSA 110,884 Chelan County, Washington 72,453
Douglas County, Washington 38,431
Longview, WA MSA 102,410 Cowlitz County, Washington 102,410
Moses Lake, WA μSA 89,120 Grant County, Washington 89,120
Centralia, WA μSA 75,455 Lewis County, Washington 75,455
Aberdeen, WA μSA 72,797 Grays Harbor County, Washington 72,797
Port Angeles, WA μSA 71,404 Clallam County, Washington 71,404
Walla Walla, WA MSA 58,781 Walla Walla County, Washington 58,781
Pullman, WA μSA 44,776 Whitman County, Washington 44,776
Ellensburg, WA μSA 40,915 Kittitas County, Washington 40,915
Lewiston, ID-WA MSA 60,888
21,623
Nez Perce County, Idaho 39,265
Asotin County, Washington 21,623
none Stevens County, Washington 43,531
Okanogan County, Washington 41,120
Jefferson County, Washington 29,872
Pacific County, Washington 20,920
Klickitat County, Washington 20,318
Adams County, Washington 18,728
San Juan County, Washington 15,769
Pend Oreille County, Washington 13,001
Lincoln County, Washington 10,570
Ferry County, Washington 7,551
Columbia County, Washington 4,078
Wahkiakum County, Washington 3,978
Garfield County, Washington 2,266
State of Washington 6,724,540

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) as a core based statistical area having at least one urbanized area of 50,000 or more population, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties.
  2. ^ The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a micropolitan statistical area (μSA) as a core based statistical area having at least one urban cluster of at least 10,000 but less than 50,000 population, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties.
  3. ^ The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a combined statistical area (CSA) as an aggregate of adjacent core based statistical areas that are linked by commuting ties.
  4. ^ a b c "OMB Bulletin No. 10-02: Update of Statistical Area Definitions and Guidance on Their Uses". United States Office of Management and Budget. December 1, 2009. Retrieved August 8, 2012. 
  5. ^ An out-of-state area and its population are displayed in green. An area that extends into more than one state is displayed in teal. A teal population number over a black population number show the total population versus the in-state population.
  6. ^ a b c d "American Factfinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 10, 2012. 
  7. ^ The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a core based statistical area as one or more adjacent counties or county-equivalents having at least one urban cluster of at least 10,000 population, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties. The core based statistical areas comprise the metropolitan statistical areas and the micropolitan statistical areas.

External links[edit]