Watch (novel)

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Watch
Watch robert j sawyer novel cover.jpg
Author Robert J. Sawyer
Country Canada
Language English
Series WWW Trilogy
Genre Science fiction
Preceded by Wake
Followed by Wonder

Watch, also called WWW: Watch, is a 2010 novel written by Canadian novelist Robert J. Sawyer.[1] It is the second installment in the WWW Trilogy and was preceded by Wake (2009) and followed by Wonder (2011).

Synopsis[edit]

Caitlin has bonded with Webmind and the two find themselves sharing an unconventional, yet fulfilling friendship. However not everything is going quite as well as they hoped, as they discover that a secret government agency named WATCH has been expressing concern over the potential threats posed by Webmind. They're convinced that the entity will bring nothing but trouble and will jeopardize the security of the United States and as such, must be destroyed.

Reception[edit]

Like its predecessor, critical reception for Watch was mostly positive. Much of the praise centered around Sawyer's use of technology and pacing,[2] and SciFiNow wrote that the book was "a great science fiction novel, a melding of Frankenstein, high technology and our own perspectives as people, brought into the context of the modern world with the skill and panache of an exemplary practitioner of the form."[3] Criticism for the book tended to stem from the usage of pop culture terms as well as Sawyer's use of the book as a platform for various viewpoints, which some reviewers felt detracted from their enjoyment.[4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gooding, Rick (Spring, 2013). "Posthuman in Waterloo.('Wake,' 'Watch' and 'Wonder')(Book review)". Canadian Literature (216): 192. Retrieved 3 May 2014. 
  2. ^ Wilson, Gil T. "WWW: Watch (review)". SF Site. Retrieved 3 May 2014. 
  3. ^ Rundle, James. "BOOK REVIEW: WATCH". SciFiNow. Retrieved 3 May 2014. 
  4. ^ DeNardo, John. "REVIEW: WWW: Watch by Robert J. Sawyer". SF Signal. Retrieved 3 May 2014. 
  5. ^ Dusmann, Cory. "A sticky Web". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 3 May 2014. 

External links[edit]