Waterfalls of North Carolina

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Looking Glass Falls is one of the most popular and easily accessible waterfalls in North Carolina

The waterfalls of North Carolina, U.S.A., are a prominent feature of the geography of the Piedmont and mountain regions of the state, as well as a major focus of tourism and outdoor recreation. Many of these falls are located in state parks, national forests, wildlife management areas, and other public lands, as well as private property. Many are accessible via established hiking trails, and some developed areas include boardwalks, observation platforms, picnic areas, and other amenities. Some of the highest and most voluminous waterfalls in the eastern United States are located in North Carolina.

Many of the waterfalls in the state are located in Transylvania County, which is called "The Land of Waterfalls". This is due to the orographic lift that results in the area having one of the highest average rainfalls in the United States (90 inches per year).[1]

Falls by county[edit]

This list is incomplete. Please feel free to add waterfalls to this list and to create articles about the waterfalls.

Visitors should always follow rules of safe waterfall hiking when visiting waterfalls.

Buncombe County[edit]

Although parts of Buncombe County receive less average rainfall than any other location in the Southeastern US, Buncombe County still has several waterfalls.

Burke County[edit]

Clay County[edit]

Macon County[edit]

Madison County[edit]

McDowell County[edit]

Rutherford County[edit]

Stokes County[edit]

Home to the isolated Sauratown Mountains.

Transylvania County[edit]

This area receives more average annual rainfall than any other place in the Eastern United States - over 90 inches a year.

Wilkes County[edit]

Yancey County[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ NC State Climate Office

See also[edit]

External links and resources[edit]