Watkins Glacier

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Watkins Glacier
Map showing the location of Watkins Glacier
Map showing the location of Watkins Glacier
Watkins Glacier
Siskiyou County, California, USA
Type Mountain glacier
Coordinates 41°23′57″N 122°10′38″W / 41.39917°N 122.17722°W / 41.39917; -122.17722Coordinates: 41°23′57″N 122°10′38″W / 41.39917°N 122.17722°W / 41.39917; -122.17722[1]
Area .04 sq mi (0.10 km2)
Length .2 mi (0.32 km)
Terminus Moraine
Status Expanding

The Watkins Glacier is a glacier situated on the southeastern flank of Mount Shasta, in the U.S. state of California. It occupies a small cirque in the Clear Creek drainage. It is the smallest officially-named glacier on Mount Shasta, and it was not accorded that status until 1976, following a decades-long campaign by local resident R. Harry Watkins, Jr., to bring recognition to the previously-ignored glacier.[2]

The Watkins is one of three small cirque glaciers on the southern side of Shasta, along with the Konwakiton and Mud Creek Glaciers located about 1 mi (1.6 km) west. It has the lowest average elevation of any of Shasta's glaciers, extending only between 10,400 and 11,000 ft (3,200 and 3,400 m).[3]

In 2002, scientists made the first detailed survey of Mount Shasta's glaciers in 50 years. They found that seven of the glaciers (including the Watkins) have grown over the period 1951-2002, with the Hotlum and Wintun Glaciers nearly doubling, the Bolam Glacier increasing by half, and the Whitney and Konwakiton Glaciers growing by a third.[4][5][6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Watkins Glacier". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-09-30. 
  2. ^ "Existing Glaciers of Mount Shasta". College of the Siskiyous. Retrieved 2007-03-07. 
  3. ^ Google Earth elevation for GNIS coordinates
  4. ^ Harris, Stephen L. (2005). Fire Mountains of the West: The Cascade and Mono Lake Volcanoes (3rd ed.). Mountain Press Publishing Company. p. 109. ISBN 0-87842-511-X. 
  5. ^ Wong, Kathleen. "California Glaciers". California Wild. California Academy of Sciences. Archived from the original on 2006-10-06. Retrieved 2007-01-23. 
  6. ^ Whitney, David (September 4, 2006). "A growing glacier: Mount Shasta bucks global trend, and researchers cite warming phenomena". The Bee. Archived from the original on 2007-01-21. Retrieved 2007-01-23.