Watkinson Juvenile Asylum and Farm School

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Watkinson Juvenile Asylum and Farm School
Watkinson School art barn, 2009-08-31.jpg
Watkinson Juvenile Asylum and Farm School in 2009
Watkinson Juvenile Asylum and Farm School is located in Connecticut
Watkinson Juvenile Asylum and Farm School
Location 140, 180 and 190 Bloomfield Avenue, Hartford, Connecticut and West Hartford, Connecticut
Coordinates 41°47′24″N 72°42′45″W / 41.79000°N 72.71250°W / 41.79000; -72.71250Coordinates: 41°47′24″N 72°42′45″W / 41.79000°N 72.71250°W / 41.79000; -72.71250
Area 36 acres (15 ha)
Built 1881
Architect Goodwin, Francis; et al.
Architectural style Queen Anne, Colonial Revival
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 95000273[1]
Added to NRHP March 23, 1995

The Watkinson Juvenile Asylum and Farm School is a historic school complex at 140, 180, and 190 Bloomfield Avenue in Hartford and West Hartford, Connecticut. The complex consists of nine buildings on about 36 acres (15 ha), most of which is in Hartford. Feringa Hall is the oldest academic building on the campus, built in 1894-5 to a Queen Anne design attributed to Francis Goodwin. Residence houses, originally for the headmaster and his assistant, date to the early 20th century. Frances Goodwin Hall is a two story brick classroom building with attached gymnasium, built in 1924.[2] The campus was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995.[1]

The campus is home to the Watkinson School, a private, co-educational day school which was established in 1881 but did not acquire this site until 1892. It is named for David Watkinson (1778-1857), a successful Hartford businessman who left a bequest for the establishment of a school for troubled boys in his will.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ a b "NRHP nomination for Watkinson Juvenile Asylum and Farm School" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-12-06. 

Georgian Revival architecture