Wauseon, Ohio

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Wauseon, Ohio
City
Buildings in downtown Wauseon
Buildings in downtown Wauseon
Motto: A City You'll Take To Heart
Location of Wauseon, Ohio
Location of Wauseon, Ohio
Coordinates: 41°33′8″N 84°8′21″W / 41.55222°N 84.13917°W / 41.55222; -84.13917Coordinates: 41°33′8″N 84°8′21″W / 41.55222°N 84.13917°W / 41.55222; -84.13917
Country United States
State Ohio
County Fulton
Government
 • Mayor Doug Shaw (R)
Area[1]
 • Total 5.19 sq mi (13.44 km2)
 • Land 5.17 sq mi (13.39 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation[2] 771 ft (235 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 7,332
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 7,312
 • Density 1,418.2/sq mi (547.6/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 43567
Area code(s) 419
FIPS code 39-81928[5]
GNIS feature ID 1047628[2]
Website http://www.cityofwauseon.com/

Wauseon is a city in and the county seat of Fulton County, Ohio, United States.[6] The population was 7,332 at the 2010 census. It was named after Wauseon, a Potawatomi Native American who lived in the area before the founding of the state.

History[edit]

Wauseon was founded in 1854. The village was incorporated in 1859, and designated county seat in 1871. The Fulton County Courthouse was built in 1872.[7]

Geography[edit]

Wauseon is the county seat of Fulton County, Ohio. It is located at 41°33′8″N 84°8′21″W / 41.55222°N 84.13917°W / 41.55222; -84.13917 (41.552230, -84.139126).[8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.19 square miles (13.44 km2), of which, 5.17 square miles (13.39 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 1,474
1880 1,905 29.2%
1890 2,060 8.1%
1900 2,148 4.3%
1910 2,650 23.4%
1920 3,035 14.5%
1930 2,889 −4.8%
1940 3,016 4.4%
1950 3,494 15.8%
1960 4,311 23.4%
1970 4,932 14.4%
1980 6,170 25.1%
1990 6,322 2.5%
2000 7,091 12.2%
2010 7,332 3.4%
Est. 2012 7,312 −0.3%
Sources:[9][10][11][12][13][5][14]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 7,332 people, 2,798 households, and 1,939 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,418.2 inhabitants per square mile (547.6 /km2). There were 3,061 housing units at an average density of 592.1 per square mile (228.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.3% White, 0.9% African American, 0.3% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 5.2% from other races, and 2.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.2% of the population.

There were 2,798 households of which 38.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.7% were non-families. 26.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.10.

The median age in the city was 35.4 years. 28.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.6% were from 25 to 44; 24.5% were from 45 to 64; and 13.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.9% male and 52.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 7,091 people, 2,706 households, and 1,875 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,437.6 people per square mile (555.3/km²). There were 2,851 housing units at an average density of 578.0 per square mile (223.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 92.77% White, 0.55% African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.82% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 4.02% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.79% of the population.

There were 2,706 households out of which 37.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.0% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.7% were non-families. 26.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the city the population was spread out with 29.1% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 20.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 88.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $39,591, and the median income for a family was $48,981. Males had a median income of $32,645 versus $24,042 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,491. About 3.9% of families and 5.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under age 18 and 1.7% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Schools[edit]

The school district is the Wauseon Exempted Village School District. This comprises:

Library[edit]

Wauseon is served by the Wauseon Public Library. In 2005, the library loaned more than 238,000 items to its 20,000 cardholders. Total holdings in 2005 were over 91,000 volumes with over 210 periodical subscriptions.[15]

Notable people[edit]

  • Jon Lugbill, American slalom canoer who competed from the late 1970s to the early 1990s.
  • Barney Oldfield, legendary car racer in the early 1900s
  • Rick Volk, member of the Baltimore Colts Super Bowl III and V (champions) teams.[16]
  • James Massey (1934-2013)- American academic & information theorist

Radio stations[edit]

96.1 WMTR

TV Stations[edit]

INTV-Channel 5

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  7. ^ Hellmann, Paul T. (May 13, 2013). "Historical Gazetteer of the United States". Routledge. p. 876. Retrieved 30 November 2013. 
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  10. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  15. ^ "2005 Ohio Public Library Statistics:Statistics by County and Town". State Library of Ohio. Retrieved November 10, 2006. 
  16. ^ Wauseon High School 2007 Athletic Hall of Fame Inductees. (n.d.). Retrieved December 4, 2007, from http://www.wauseon.k12.oh.us/Hall_of_Fame/Rick%20Volk.pdf

External links[edit]