E Weinan

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Weinan E
WeinanE.jpg
Weinan E in 2003
Born Jingjiang, China
Nationality Chinese
Fields Applied mathematics
Institutions Princeton University
Peking University
Alma mater University of California, Los Angeles
Chinese Academy of Science
University of Science and Technology of China
Doctoral advisor Björn Engquist
This is a Chinese name; the family name is E.

E Weinan (Chinese: 鄂维南; born September 1963 in Jingjiang), known in Western name order as Weinan E, is a Chinese mathematician. He is known for his work in applied mathematics, with applications to fluid mechanics and material science.[1] In addition, he has worked on multiscale modeling and the study of rare events.[2]

He has also made contributions to homogenization theory, theoretical models of turbulence, stochastic partial differential equations, electronic structure analysis, multiscale methods, computational fluid dynamics, and weak KAM theory. He is currently a professor in the Department of Mathematics and Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics at Princeton University, and the Beijing International Center for Mathematical Research at Peking University.

Biography[edit]

E Weinan was born in Jingjiang, China. He completed his undergraduate studies in the Department of Mathematics at University of Science and Technology of China in 1982, and his master degree in Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science at Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1985. He obtained his Ph.D. degree under the advice of Björn Engquist in the Department of Mathematics at University of California, Los Angeles in 1989. He then became a visiting member in Courant Institute, New York University from 1989 to 1991, and a member in Institute for Advanced Study from 1991 to 1992. After spending two more years as a long term member in Institute for Advanced Study, he joined Courant Institute, New York University as an associate professor in 1994, and became a full professor in 1997. Since 1999, he has been holding a professorship in the Department of Mathematics and Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics at Princeton University. He has also been holding a professorship in the Beijing International Center for Mathematical Research (BICMR) since 2005.

He has made contributions to homogenization theory, theoretical models of turbulence, stochastic partial differential equations, electronic structure analysis, multiscale methods, computational fluid dynamics, and weak KAM theory. In the study of rare events, he and collaborators have developed the string method and transition path theory. In multiscale modeling, he and collaborators have developed the heterogeneous multiscale methods (HMM). He has also made significant contributions to the mathematical understanding of the microscopic foundation to the macroscopic theories for solids.

Awards[edit]

He received Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering in 1996,[3] and Feng Kang Prize in Scientific Computing in 1999.[4] He was the recipient of ICIAM Collatz Prize[5] at the 5th International Congress of Industrial & Applied Math for his work on industrial and applied mathematics, the Ralph E. Kleinman Prize in 2009,[6] and the Theodore von Kármán Prize in 2014.[7] He was elected as a fellow of Institute of Physics in 2005, a fellow of SIAM in 2009,[8] and a member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2011.[9] He was invited to speak at the International Congress of Mathematicians (2002), and at Annual Meeting of the American Mathematical Society (2003). In 2012 he became a fellow of the American Mathematical Society.[10]

Selected publications[edit]

Book: Principles of Multiscale Modeling.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Applied Mathematics Entering the 21st Century: Invited Talks- 2004 Page 411 James M. Hill, Ross Moore "The scientific work of Weinan E covers many areas of applied mathematics ranging from fluid dynamics to condensed matter physics, including incompressible flows, turbulence, statistical physics, superconductivity, liquid crystals and .."
  2. ^ Rare events, transition pathways and reaction rates
  3. ^ Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (1996)
  4. ^ Feng Kang Prize in Scientific Computing (1999)
  5. ^ ICIAM Collatz Prize (2003)
  6. ^ Ralph E. Kleinman Prize (2009)
  7. ^ Theodore von Kármán Prize
  8. ^ SIAM fellow(2009)
  9. ^ Member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences(2011)
  10. ^ List of Fellows of the American Mathematical Society, retrieved 2012-11-10.

External links[edit]