Weiss WM-21 Sólyom

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WM-21 Sólyom
Role Light Bomber/Reconnaissance Biplane
National origin Hungary
Manufacturer Manfred Weiss
Introduction 1939-1945
Number built 128
Developed from Weiss WM-16 Budapest

The Weiss WM-21 Sólyom (English: Falcon) was a 1930s Hungarian light bomber and reconnaissance biplane developed by the Manfred Weiss company from the earlier WM-16 which was based on the Fokker C.V.

Design and development[edit]

The WM-21 was designed as an simplified variant of the WM-16 for service use, the structure was strengthened and refined and the tailwheel was replaced with a tailskid to allow for shorter landing runs on grass airfields.[1] A conventional biplane, the Sólyom was powered by a 870 hp (649 kW) Weiss WM-K-14A radial engine.[1] A total of 128 aircraft were built by three different factories, Manfred Weiss built 25, 43 by MAVAG and 60 by MWG.[1]

Operational history[edit]

The first aircraft entered service in 1939 with short-range reconnaissance units, although active during the 1940 dispute with Romania their first active operational use was during the Axis invasion of Yugoslavia in August 1941.[1] From June 1941 they were used to support Hungarian Army units in the Ukraine and then against Soviet partisans.[1] Around 80 aircraft were also transferred to duties as trainers, as they were removed from operational use, until 1945.[1]

Operators[edit]

 Hungary

Specifications[edit]

Data from [1][2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 9.64 m (31 ft 8 in)
  • Upper wingspan: 12.90 m (42 ft 4 in)
  • Lower wingspan: 9.40 m (30 ft 10 in)
  • Height: 3.5 m (11 ft 6 in)
  • Empty weight: 2,300 kg (5,071 lb)
  • Gross weight: 3,400 kg (7,496 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Weiss WM-K-14A radial, 650 kW (870 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 320 km/h (199 mph; 173 kn)
  • Range: 750 km (466 mi; 405 nmi)

Armament

  • Guns: 3 x 7.9mm (0.31in) Gebauser machine-guns
  • Bombs: 12 x 10kg (22lb) Anti-personnel bombs and 120 x 1kg (2.2 lb) incendiary bombs

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Orbis 1985, p. 3079
  2. ^ "AWM-21 Sólyom". Retrieved 28 January 2012. 

Bibliography[edit]