Wellington, Kansas

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Wellington, Kansas
City
Wellington, Kansas is known as The Wheat Capital of the World.
Wellington, Kansas is known as The Wheat Capital of the World.
Nickname(s): "Wheat Capital of the World"
Location of Wellington, Kansas
Location of Wellington, Kansas
Detailed map of Wellington, Kansas
Detailed map of Wellington, Kansas
Coordinates: 37°16′2″N 97°24′0″W / 37.26722°N 97.40000°W / 37.26722; -97.40000Coordinates: 37°16′2″N 97°24′0″W / 37.26722°N 97.40000°W / 37.26722; -97.40000
Country United States
State Kansas
County Sumner
Area[1]
 • Total 8.19 sq mi (21.21 km2)
 • Land 7.61 sq mi (19.71 km2)
 • Water 0.58 sq mi (1.50 km2)
Elevation 1,230 ft (375 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 8,172
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 7,997
 • Density 1,073.9/sq mi (414.6/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 67152
Area code(s) 620
FIPS code 20-76475
GNIS feature ID 0470147[4]
Website CityOfWellington.net

Wellington is a city in and the county seat of Sumner County, Kansas, United States.[5] As of the 2010 census, the city population was 8,172.[6]

History[edit]

19th century[edit]

1915 Railroad Map of Sumner County

Wellington was first surveyed in 1871 and named for the Duke of Wellington.[7] It was designated as the permanent seat of Sumner County in 1872, winning out over competitor Sumner City.[citation needed] Trading with the cattle herds coming up the Chisholm Trail was an important factor in the early economy of the town.[8]

The first post office in Wellington was established in July 1871.[9]

In 1887, the Chicago, Kansas and Nebraska Railway built a branch line north-south from Herington through Wellington to Caldwell.[10] It foreclosed in 1891 and was taken over by Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway, which shut down in 1980 and reorganized as Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas Railroad, merged in 1988 with Missouri Pacific Railroad, merged in 1997 with Union Pacific Railroad. Most locals still refer to this railroad as the "Rock Island".

Geography[edit]

Wellington is located at 37°16′2″N 97°24′0″W / 37.26722°N 97.40000°W / 37.26722; -97.40000 (37.267289, -97.400061)[11], at an elevation of 1230 feet.[4] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.19 square miles (21.21 km2), of which, 7.61 square miles (19.71 km2) is land and 0.58 square miles (1.50 km2) is water.[1]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Wellington has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[12]

Area events[edit]

Area attractions[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 2,094
1890 4,391 109.7%
1900 4,245 −3.3%
1910 7,034 65.7%
1920 7,048 0.2%
1930 7,405 5.1%
1940 7,246 −2.1%
1950 7,747 6.9%
1960 8,809 13.7%
1970 8,072 −8.4%
1980 8,212 1.7%
1990 8,411 2.4%
2000 8,647 2.8%
2010 8,172 −5.5%
Est. 2012 7,997 −2.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[13]
2012 Estimate[14]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 8,172 people, 3,246 households, and 2,105 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,073.9 inhabitants per square mile (414.6 /km2). There were 3,736 housing units at an average density of 490.9 per square mile (189.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 91.0% White, 1.7% African American, 1.5% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 2.0% from other races, and 3.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.3% of the population.

There were 3,246 households of which 33.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.0% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 35.2% were non-families. 30.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 14% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.03.

The median age in the city was 37.7 years. 27.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.2% were from 25 to 44; 26.1% were from 45 to 64; and 16.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.7% male and 51.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 8,647 people, 3,422 households, and 2,306 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,529.6 people per square mile (590.9/km²). There were 3,795 housing units at an average density of 671.3 per square mile (259.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 92.36% White, 1.71% African American, 1.24% Native American, 0.29% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 2.58% from other races, and 1.72% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.26% of the population.

There were 3,422 households out of which 32.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.1% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.6% were non-families. 29.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.6% under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 20.9% from 45 to 64, and 16.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 93.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $35,410, and the median income for a family was $43,493. Males had a median income of $34,368 versus $22,254 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,790. About 8.9% of families and 11.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.6% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.

Economy[edit]

This area produces vast quantities of winter wheat and wheat is still the driving force behind the local economy, so much so that Wellington is called the "Wheat Capital of the World". Railroads and petroleum are also significant, and manufacturing, especially aircraft parts, is growing.[8]

Notable people[edit]

  • Ernie Barrett, Professional basketball player for the Boston Celtics (first round 7th pick in 1951 NBA draft). Also nicknamed "Mr. K-State" for his love of Kansas State and his performance as a player at Kansas State. He has a statute standing outside of Bramlage Coliseum, as well as his jersey retired. Was the point guard for Wellington during their only basketball state championship in 1947.
  • Arthur S. Champeny, United States Army officer
  • Dort Clark, film and television actor 1940s-1970s, over 60 roles[15]
  • Mardie Cornejo, major league baseball player for the New York Mets.
  • Nate Cornejo, major league baseball player for the Detroit Tigers. First round draft pick.
  • Neil Frank, meteorologist and former director of the National Hurricane Center
  • Joseph E. Maddy, pioneering music educator and founder of the Interlochen Arts Camp
  • Chuck Miller, pop and jazz musician
  • David L. Payne, American soldier and pioneer
  • Matthew David Stalcup, professional baseball player. Drafted in the 9th round by the Oakland Athletics in 2013 after a standout career at Pittsburg State University.
  • Mike Wilmoth, Long time head baseball coach at Wellington High School, and KSHAA referee. Coached professionals Nate Cornejo, Jesse Cornejo, Tyler Ybarra, and Matt Stalcup (Nate Cornejo being the only one to make the majors as of 2013). In 2012 he served as an NFL replacement referee, and now that he is retiring as a teacher at Wellington high school will be serving as an NFL scout.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  4. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  6. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2011. 
  7. ^ Kansas State Historical Society (1916). Biennial Report of the Board of Directors of the Kansas State Historical Society. Kansas State Printing Plant. p. 304. 
  8. ^ a b Wellington KS on Blue Skyways
  9. ^ "Kansas Post Offices, 1828-1961, page 2". Kansas Historical Society. Retrieved 27 June 2014. 
  10. ^ Rock Island Rail History
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  12. ^ Climate Summary for Wellington, Kansas
  13. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved December 23, 2013. 
  14. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Retrieved December 23, 2013. 
  15. ^ Dort Clark profile IMDB

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Maps