Wellington Central (New Zealand electorate)

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For the suburb, see Wellington Central, Wellington.
Wellington central electorate 2008.png

Wellington Central is an electorate, represented by a Member of Parliament in the New Zealand House of Representatives. Its MP since November 2008 has been Labour Party's Grant Robertson.

Population centres[edit]

Through the City Single Electorates Act, 1903, the three-member electorates of the four main centres were split again, and this became effective at the end of the 15th Parliament and was thus used for the 1905 election. The City of Wellington electorate split into the Wellington East, Wellington Central, and Wellington North electorates.[1]

As of 1999 Wellington Central covered the central city and its immediate suburban periphery, stretching from Karori, Wilton and Wadestown in the west, to the summit of Mount Victoria in the east, and southwards to a boundary with the Rongotai electorate near Wellington Hospital. Prior to the 1999 election, its boundaries extended further north to include the affluent suburbs of Ngaio and Khandallah.

Wellington Central has one of the most affluent and well-educated constituencies in New Zealand. It is home to many government agencies, as well as to the Parliamentary complex and to two universities.

Following the 2014 boundary review, Wellington Central lost the suburb of Wadestown to the Ōhariu electorate.

History[edit]

Wellington Central was established in 1905 when the multi-member urban electorate City of Wellington was replaced by three new seats: Wellington East, Wellington North and Wellington Central. It was nominally abolished in 1993, when a redistribution moved its boundary west, resulting in the new name of Wellington-Karori. Three years later, a new, larger Wellington Central was created as one of the 65 original MMP constituencies in time for the 1996 election. A prominent holder of the seat was Labour Party leader Peter Fraser, who was Prime Minister from 1940 to 1949.

The first elected MMP representative was ACT Party leader Richard Prebble, controversially elected in 1996 after National Party leader Jim Bolger indicated that National voters should give their electorate vote to Prebble rather than to National's candidate Mark Thomas, in order for ACT to get into parliament. Prebble would eventually became the third representative from Wellington Central in three elections to face defeat after a single term in office. Labour's Marian Hobbs held the seat from 1999, when she defeated Prebble, until 2008, when she retired. Grant Robertson retained Labour's hold on the seat in 2008 and 2011.

A documentary, Campaign, produced by Tony Sutorius, highlighted the events surrounding the 1996 campaign in the electorate.[1]

Members of Parliament[edit]

Key

 New Liberal    Independent    Reform    Liberal  
 Labour    National    ACT    Green  
Election Winner
1905 election Francis Fisher
1908 election
1911 election
1914 election Robert Fletcher
1918 by-election 1919 election 1922 election 1925 election 1928 election 1931 election 1935 election 1938 election 1943 election Peter Fraser
1946 election 1949 election 1951 election Charles Chapman
1954 election 1957 election Frank Kitts
1960 election 1963 election 1966 election 1969 election Dan Riddiford
1972 election 1975 election 1978 election Ken Comber
1981 election 1984 election 1987 election 1990 election Fran Wilde
1992 by-election Chris Laidlaw
(electorate abolished 1993–1996, see Wellington-Karori)
1996 election Richard Prebble
1999 election 2002 election 2005 election Marian Hobbs
2008 election 2011 election Grant Robertson

List MPs[edit]

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Wellington Central electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

Election Winner
1999 election Richard Prebble
2002 election Stephen Franks
Sue Kedgley
2005 election Mark Blumsky
Sue Kedgley
2008 election Sue Kedgley
Heather Roy

Election results[edit]

2011 election[edit]

General Election 2011: Wellington Central[2]

Notes: Green background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY Grant Robertson 18,836 49.15 +6.97 10,459 26.56 -8.01
National Paul Foster-Bell 12,460 32.51 -4.96 15,128 38.42 +3.01
Green James Shaw 5,225 13.63 -1.14 10,903 27.69 +7.08
ACT Stephen Whittington 412 1.07 -1.21 462 1.17 -2.78
Legalise Cannabis Michael Appleby 404 1.05 +0.05 161 0.41 +0.15
NZ First Ben Craven 279 0.73 +0.73 1,132 2.88 +1.35
Pirate Gynn Rickerby 277 0.72 +0.72
Conservative Paul Stipkovits 236 0.62 +0.62 270 0.69 +0.69
Libertarianz Reagan Cutting 69 0.18 -0.01 40 0.10 -0.01
Alliance Kelly Buchanan 52 0.14 +0.14 18 0.05 -0.003
New Economics Laurence Boomert 44 0.11 +0.11
Independent Puhi Karena 32 0.08 +0.08
Māori   278 0.71 -0.15
United Future   256 0.65 -0.35
Mana   250 0.63 +0.63
Democratic   15 0.04 +0.03
Informal votes 411 153
Total Valid votes 38,326 39,372
Labour hold Majority 6,376 16.64 +11.92

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 48,316[3]

2008 election[edit]

General Election 2008: Wellington Central[4]

Notes: Green background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
Labour Grant Robertson 17,046 42.18 14,244 34.57
National Stephen Franks 15,142 37.47 14,589 35.41
Green Sue Kedgley 5,971 14.78 8,494 20.62
ACT Heather Roy 922 2.28 1,628 3.95
Legalise Cannabis Michael Appleby 407 1.01 108 0.26
United Future Vaughan Smith 226 0.56 412 1.00
Workers Party Don Franks 171 0.42 38 0.09
Progressive David Somerset 141 0.35 272 0.66
Kiwi Rebekah Clement 106 0.26 84 0.20
Libertarianz Bernard Darnton 75 0.19 48 0.12
RAM Grant Brookes 61 0.15 13 0.03
Independent Al Mansell 58 0.14 -
RONZ Justin Harnish 46 0.11 5 0.01
Alliance Richard Wallis 39 0.10 20 0.05
NZ First   629 1.53
Māori   351 0.85
Bill and Ben   215 0.52
Family Party   38 0.09
Pacific   8 0.02
Democratic   4 0.01
Informal votes 229 86
Total Valid votes 40,411 41,200
Labour hold Majority 1,904

2005 election[edit]

General election 2005: Wellington Central[5]

Notes: Green background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY Marian Hobbs 20,199 49.32 +8.26 17,936 43.26
National Mark Blumsky 14,019 34.23 +4.69 13,513 32.59
Green Sue Kedgley 3737 9.12 -3.93 6530 15.75
ACT Stephen Franks 1254 3.06 848 2.05
United Future Fiona McKenzie 593 1.45 1068 2.58
Legalise Cannabis Michael Appleby 426 1.04 98 0.24
Progressive David Somerset 173 0.26 309 0.75
Anti-Capitalist Alliance Stephen Hay 107 0.26
Libertarianz Bernard Darnton 79 0.19 42 0.10
Alliance Kane O'Connell 79 0.19 35 0.08
NZ First   707 1.71
Māori   168 0.41
Destiny   67 0.16
Christian Heritage   24 0.06
Democratic   10 0.02
99 MP   8 0.02
RONZ   4 0.01
Family Rights   3 0.01
Direct Democracy   2 0.00
One NZ   1 0.00
Informal votes 288 86
Total Valid votes 40,954 41,459
Labour hold Majority 6180 15.09 +3.57

1946 election[edit]

General election, 1946: Wellington Central[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Charles Henry Chapman 6,201 57.83
National Agnes Louisa Weston[nb 1] 4,521 42.17
Majority 1,680 15.67 +7.52
Informal votes 96 0.89 -0.60
Turnout 10,818 88.35 +7.75
Registered electors 12,245

Table footnotes:

  1. ^ Claude Weston died suddenly on 10 November 1946 and was replaced by his wife[7][8]

1943 election[edit]

General election, 1943: Wellington Central[9][10][11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Peter Fraser 6,822 46.12 -16.74
National Will Appleton 5,616 37.97 +0.83
Independent Colin Scrimgeour 2,253 15.23
Independent William Julius Hyde 100 0.68
Majority 1,206 8.15 -17.57
Informal votes 223 1.49 +0.89
Turnout 15,014 80.59 +6.15
Registered electors 18,629

1938 election[edit]

General election, 1938: Wellington Central[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Peter Fraser 9,376 62.86 -6.19
National Will Appleton 5,539 37.14
Majority 3,837 25.73 -12.37
Informal votes 89 0.59
Turnout 15,004 86.74 +5.05
Registered electors 17,297

1931 election[edit]

General election, 1931: Wellington Central[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Peter Fraser 6,308 57.26 -3.55
United Robert Darroch 3,837 34.83
Independent Edward William Nicolaus 688 6.25
Communist Richard Francis Griffin 183 1.66
Majority 2,471 22.43 -6.17
Informal votes 91 0.82 -0.37
Turnout 11,107 74.82 -8.79
Registered electors 14,845

1928 election[edit]

General election, 1928: Wellington Central[14][15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Peter Fraser 7,353 60.81
Reform Andrew Sloane 3,895 32.21
Independent Margaret Young 843 6.97
Majority 3,458 28.60
Informal votes 145 1.19
Turnout 12,236 83.61
Registered electors 14,635

1918 by-election[edit]

Wellington Central by-election, 1918[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Peter Fraser 2,668 56.54
Independent Labour Joe Mack 1,044 22.12
National Government William Hildreth 784 16.61
Radical Harry Atmore 185 3.92
Returned Soldier L J F Garmston 29 0.61
Independent Will C Tanner 9 0.19
Majority 1,624 34.41
Turnout 4,719 51.43
Registered electors 9,176
Labour gain from Liberal Swing

1914 election[edit]

1914 general election: Wellington Central[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Robert Fletcher 5,208 64.40
Reform Francis Fisher 2,879 35.60
Majority 2,329 28.80
Informal votes 84 1.03
Turnout 8,171 84.47
Registered electors 9,673
Liberal gain from Reform Swing

1911 election[edit]

First ballot[edit]

1911 general election: Wellington Central[18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Reform Francis Fisher 2,987 39.71
Liberal Robert Fletcher 2,983 39.66
Independent William Thomas Young 1,372 18.24
Independent Frank Freeman 180 2.39
Majority 4 0.05
Informal votes 121 1.58
Turnout 7,643 70.89
Registered electors 10,781

Second ballot[edit]

1911 general election: Wellington Central[18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Reform Francis Fisher 3,813 50.87
Liberal Robert Fletcher 3,682 49.13
Majority 131 1.75
Informal votes 19 0.25
Turnout 7,514 69.70
Registered electors 10,781
Reform gain from Independent Swing

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ McRobie 1989, pp. 66ff.
  2. ^ "Official Count Results -- Wellington Central". Electoral Commission. 10 December 2011. 
  3. ^ "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 17 December 2011. 
  4. ^ 2008 election results
  5. ^ election result Wellington Central 2005
  6. ^ "The General Election, 1946". National Library. 1947. p. 11. Retrieved 1 January 2014. 
  7. ^ Gustafson 1986, p. 389.
  8. ^ "Claude Horace Weston". Auckland War Memorial Museum. Retrieved 28 March 2014. 
  9. ^ "The General Election, 1943". National Library. 1944. p. 11. Retrieved 28 March 2014. 
  10. ^ "Results from all Electorates". Evening Post. CXXXVI (76). 27 September 1943. p. 6. Retrieved 28 March 2014. 
  11. ^ "City Nominations". Evening Post. CXXXVI (61). 9 September 1943. p. 9. Retrieved 28 March 2014. 
  12. ^ "The General Election, 1938". National Library. 1939. p. 5. Retrieved 28 March 2014. 
  13. ^ "Declaration of Result of Poll for the Electoral District of Wellington Central". The Evening Post CXII (140). 10 December 1931. p. 2. Retrieved 5 March 2014. 
  14. ^ The General Election, 1928. Government Printer. 1929. p. 6. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
  15. ^ "Declaration of Result of Poll for the Electoral District of Wellington Central". New Zealand Truth (1200). 29 November 1928. p. 14. Retrieved 5 March 2014. 
  16. ^ "A victory for Labour". The Evening Post XCVI (83). 4 October 1918. p. 3. Retrieved 15 March 2014. 
  17. ^ The General Election, 1914. Government Printer. 1915. p. 3. Retrieved 15 March 2014. 
  18. ^ a b The General Election, 1914. Government Printer. 1915. p. 7. Retrieved 15 March 2014. 

References[edit]

  • Gustafson, Barry (1986). The First 50 Years : A History of the New Zealand National Party. Auckland: Reed Methuen. ISBN 0-474-00177-6. 
  • McRobie, Alan (1989). Electoral Atlas of New Zealand. Wellington: GP Books. ISBN 0-477-01384-8. 
  • Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First published in 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103. 

External links[edit]