Wendy Smith-Sly

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Wendy Smith-Sly
Personal information
Born 5 November 1959

Wendy Smith-Sly (born 5 November 1959) is a British former athlete, who competed mainly in the 3,000 metres. She won a silver medal in the event at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics. She also won the 1983 10km World Road Race Championships in San Diego.

Career[edit]

Sly was born in Hampton, Greater London, England. In 1978, as Wendy Smith, she finished 43rd at the World Cross Country Championships, and won a team bronze medal. In 1980, she was the UK number one in the 3000 metres and finished second in the 1500 metres at the UK Championships.[1] /bc/ In 1982, at the Commonwealth Games in Brisbane, she won a silver medal in the 3000 metres, running 8:48.47 behind Anne Audain.

In 1983, now competing as Wendy Sly, she finished fifth in the finals of both the 1500 metres and the 3000 metres at the inaugural World Championships in Helsinki. She ran her lifetime bests in both events, 4:04.14 in the 1500 m and 8:37.06 in the 3000 m. Also that year, she won the IAAF World Women's Road Race Championships in San Diego contested over 10km.

At her first Olympic Games in 1984 in Los Angeles, Sly won a silver medal in the infamous 3000 metres final that included the collision between Mary Decker and Zola Budd, with whom she had a strong rivalry. She ran a seasons best of 8:39.47. The race was won by Maricica Puica of Romania.

Sly finished eighth in the 1987 World Championships 3000 metres final in Rome. Then at her second Olympics in Seoul, she finished seventh in the 3000 metres final in 8:37.70, her fastest time in five years.[2]

As of 2014, Sly still ranks in the UK all-time top 10 lists in the 3000 metres (6th with 8:37.06 1983), 10,000 metres (10th with 31:53.36 in 1988), 10km road (3rd with 31:29 in 1983) and 15km road (4th with 48:17 in 1985).

Personal Life[edit]

In 1997, she had a son, Max Heath.

Achievements[edit]

  • 1986 UK 3000 metres Champion
  • 1987 AAAs 3000 metres Champion
  • 1988 AAAs Indoor 3000 metres Champion
Year Competition Venue Position Event Notes
1978 World Cross Country Championships Glasgow, Scotland 43rd 4.7km
1981 World Cross Country Championships Madrid, Spain 65th 4.4km
1982 Commonwealth Games Brisbane, Australia 2nd 3000 m 8:48.47
1983 World Championships Helsinki, Finland 5th 1500 m 4:04.14
5th 3000 m 8:37.06
World Women's Road Race Championships San Diego, United States 1st 10km 32:23
1984 Olympic Games Los Angeles, United States 2nd 3000 m 8:39
1986 Commonwealth Games Edinburgh, Scotland 8th 3000 m 9:14.04
1987 World Championships Rome, Italy 8th 300 m 8:45.85
1988 Olympic Games Seoul, South Korea 7th 3000 m 8:37.70
1990 Commonwealth Games Auckland, New Zealand DNF 10,000 m

References[edit]

External links[edit]