Werrington, Cornwall

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Coordinates: 50°39′54″N 4°21′58″W / 50.665°N 4.366°W / 50.665; -4.366

St Martin's Church, Werrington

Werrington (Cornish: Trewolvredow)[1] is a civil parish and former manor now in Cornwall, England, formerly before 1974 boundary changes, within the county of Devon.[2][3][4] It is situated 1 mile to the west of the River Tamar, the traditional boundary between Devon and Cornwall, and 2 miles north of Launceston.

Manor[edit]

The descent of the manor of Werrington was as follows:

Crown[edit]

Before the Norman Conquest of 1066, the manor of Werrington, in the hundred of Black Torrington,[5] was a possession of Gytha of Wessex (died 1098 or 1107), the mother of King Harold (d.1066). In the Domesday Book of 1086 it is recorded as Ulvredintone.[6]

Tavistock Abbey[edit]

In about 1066-8 she gave it to Tavistock Abbey,[7] which held it until the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

Russell[edit]

At the Dissolution of the Monasteries Werrington was granted in 1540, together with most of the other possessions of Tavistock Abbey, by King Henry VIII to John Russell, 1st Baron Russell (1485-1555)(later 1st Earl of Bedford).[8] Russell sold the manor to Edward Woodward and Henry and Bartholomew Lucas.[9]

Drake[edit]

It was acquired in 1620 by Sir Francis Drake, 1st Baronet (1588-1637), of Buckland Monachorum in Devon, nephew of the famous Admiral Sir Francis Drake (d.1596). In 1631 he obtained a royal licence to empark lands in Werrington and St. Stephen by Launceston[10] and later rebuilt the manor house.[11] In 1649 Sir Francis Drake, 2nd Baronet (1617-1662) purchased the nearby manor of Launceston and the borough of Newport in the parish of St. Stephen, and moved his main residence to Buckland Monachorum, whereupon he sold Werrington to Sir William Morice.[12]

Morice[edit]

Werrington Park, Devonshire, undated watercolour by Francis Towne (1739–1816), Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, USA

The estate was sold in 1651[13] to Sir William Morice (1602-1676), Secretary of State to King Charles II,[14] who also purchased from the Drake family the manor of Launceston. The present mansion, today known as Werrington Park was built by one of his descendants in the 1730s, possibly to the design of William Kent,[15] which involved the demolition and re-siting of the parish church of St Martin.[16]

Percy[edit]

The manor with 11,000 acres[17] was purchased in 1775 by Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland (1714–1786), who further embellished the interior.[18] He also purchased all the outlying tenements in Newport and much property in the borough of Launceston.[19]

Various 1864-1882[edit]

Between 1864 and 1882 Werrington passed through a succession of brief ownerships. In 1864 Werrington was purchased by Alexander Hey Campbell, a Manchester merchant, MP for Launceston from 1865 to 1868. In 1868 he sold it to William Wentworth Fitzwilliam Dick, of County Wicklow, Ireland, who sold it in 1871 to Col. James Henry Deakin I (1823–1880), a Manchester merchant, briefly Member of Parliament for Launceston, who was succeeded in that seat by his son James Henry Deakin II (1851–1881). During this period much of the peripheral lands and properties of the estate were sold off.

Williams[edit]

The estate was acquired in 1882 by John Charles Williams (1861-1939) of Caerhays Castle,[20] who renovated the house, including a re-modelling of the East Range.[21]

Church of St Martin[edit]

The parish church of St Martin was re-built in 1742 on a new site in the Gothic style; the tower is from the old church.[22]

Sources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Place-names in the Standard Written Form (SWF) : List of place-names agreed by the MAGA Signage Panel. Cornish Language Partnership.
  2. ^ Pevsner, Nikolaus & Cherry, Bridget, The Buildings of England: Devon, London, 2004, p.896
  3. ^ "Cornwall Council - Werrington Parish Council". Retrieved 10 October 2010. 
  4. ^ "Werrington As described in John Bartholomew's Gazetteer of the British Isles (1887)". A Vision of Britain Through Time. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 10 October 2010. 
  5. ^ Thorn, Caroline & Frank, (eds.) Domesday Book, (Morris, John, gen.ed.) Vol. 9, Devon, Parts 1 & 2, Phillimore Press, Chichester, 1985, part 2, 1,50
  6. ^ Thorn, Caroline & Frank, (eds.) Domesday Book, (Morris, John, gen.ed.) Vol. 9, Devon, Parts 1 & 2, Phillimore Press, Chichester, 1985, part 1, 1,50
  7. ^ Hoskins, W.G., A New Survey of England: Devon, London, 1959 (first published 1954), p.513
  8. ^ Hoskins, W.G., A New Survey of England: Devon, London, 1959 (first published 1954), p.513
  9. ^ Cornwall Record Office, Werrington Estate Records, covering dates 1433 - 1909, ref: WW, Introduction
  10. ^ Cornwall Record Office, Werrington Estate Records, covering dates 1433 - 1909, ref: WW, Introduction[1]
  11. ^ Pevsner, Nikolaus & Cherry, Bridget, The Buildings of England: Devon, London, 2004, p.896
  12. ^ Cornwall Record Office, Werrington Estate Records, covering dates 1433 - 1909, ref: WW, Introduction
  13. ^ Hoskins, p.513 "1651"
  14. ^ Pevsner, Nikolaus & Cherry, Bridget, The Buildings of England: Devon, London, 2004, p.896
  15. ^ Hoskins, p.513
  16. ^ Hoskins, p.513
  17. ^ Cornwall Record Office, Werrington Estate Records, covering dates 1433 - 1909, ref: WW, Introduction
  18. ^ Hoskins, p.513
  19. ^ Cornwall Record Office, Werrington Estate Records, covering dates 1433 - 1909, ref: WW, Introduction
  20. ^ Cornwall Record Office, Werrington Estate Records, covering dates 1433 - 1909, ref: WW, Introduction
  21. ^ Pevsner, p.897
  22. ^ Pevsner, N. (1952) North Devon. Penguin Books

External links[edit]