West Cape May, New Jersey

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West Cape May, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of West Cape May
Sign indicating West Cape May
Sign indicating West Cape May
West Cape May Borough highlighted in Cape May County. Inset map: Cape May County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
West Cape May Borough highlighted in Cape May County. Inset map: Cape May County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of West Cape May, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of West Cape May, New Jersey
Coordinates: 38°56′32″N 74°56′21″W / 38.942226°N 74.939033°W / 38.942226; -74.939033Coordinates: 38°56′32″N 74°56′21″W / 38.942226°N 74.939033°W / 38.942226; -74.939033[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Cape May
Incorporated April 17, 1884
Government[5]
 • Type Walsh Act
 • Mayor Pamela Kaithern (term ends May 21, 2013)[3]
 • Clerk Elaine Wallace[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.175 sq mi (3.044 km2)
 • Land 1.165 sq mi (3.018 km2)
 • Water 0.010 sq mi (0.026 km2)  0.86%
Area rank 487th of 566 in state
14th of 16 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 10 ft (3 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 1,024
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 1,022
 • Rank 533rd of 566 in state
13th of 16 in county[11]
 • Density 878.8/sq mi (339.3/km2)
 • Density rank 399th of 566 in state
9th of 16 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08204[12]
Area code(s) 609[13]
FIPS code 3400978530[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID 0885435[16][2]
Website www.westcapemay.us

West Cape May is a Walsh Act borough in Cape May County, New Jersey, United States. It is part of the Ocean City Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,024,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 71 (-6.5%) from the 1,095 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 69 (+6.7%) from the 1,026 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

West Cape May was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 17, 1884, from portions of Lower Township, based on the results of a referendum held two days earlier. The borough was reincorporated on April 11, 1890, and again on May 4, 1897.[18]

During Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, West Cape May was hit by 9.53 inches (242 mm) of rain, the most of any place in the state.[19]

It is a dry town, where alcohol cannot be sold, affirmed by the results of a referendum held in 1940,[20][21] joining Cape May Point, Ocean City and Wildwood Crest among municipalities in Cape May restricting the sale of alcohol.[22]

Geography[edit]

West Cape May is located at 38°56′32″N 74°56′21″W / 38.942226°N 74.939033°W / 38.942226; -74.939033 (38.942226,-74.939033). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.175 square miles (3.044 km2), of which, 1.165 square miles (3.018 km2) of it was land and 0.010 square miles (0.026 km2) of it (0.86%) was water.[1][2]

The borough borders Lower Township and Cape May City

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 757
1900 696 −8.1%
1910 844 21.3%
1920 967 14.6%
1930 1,048 8.4%
1940 934 −10.9%
1950 897 −4.0%
1960 1,030 14.8%
1970 1,005 −2.4%
1980 1,091 8.6%
1990 1,026 −6.0%
2000 1,095 6.7%
2010 1,024 −6.5%
Est. 2012 1,022 [10] −0.2%
Population sources:
1890-2000[23] 1890-1920[24] 1890[25]
1890-1910[26] 1910-1930[27]
1930-1990[28] 2000[29][30] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,024 people, 493 households, and 293.8 families residing in the borough. The population density was 878.8 per square mile (339.3 /km2). There were 1,043 housing units at an average density of 895.1 per square mile (345.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 85.84% (879) White, 8.69% (89) Black or African American, 0.78% (8) Native American, 0.20% (2) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 3.13% (32) from other races, and 1.37% (14) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.98% (51) of the population.[7]

There were 493 households, of which 14.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.0% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.4% were non-families. 36.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 17.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.08 and the average family size was 2.66.[7]

In the borough, 12.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.1% from 18 to 24, 13.5% from 25 to 44, 39.2% from 45 to 64, and 28.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 55.0 years. For every 100 females there were 93.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.0 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $48,281 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,924) and the median family income was $51,394 (+/- $3,176). Males had a median income of $42,361 (+/- $10,529) versus $43,860 (+/- $3,583) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $34,328 (+/- $4,010). About 8.4% of families and 6.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.0% of those under age 18 and 4.8% of those age 65 or over.[31]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 1,095 people, 507 households, and 302 families residing in the borough. The population density was 923.5 people per square mile (355.3/km2). There were 1,004 housing units at an average density of 846.8 per square mile (325.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 84.11% White, 14.52% African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.55% from other races, and 0.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.83% of the population.[29][30]

There were 507 households out of which 21.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.2% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.4% were non-families. 35.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.16 and the average family size was 2.80.[29][30]

In the borough the population was spread out with 19.6% under the age of 18, 3.6% from 18 to 24, 23.7% from 25 to 44, 28.7% from 45 to 64, and 24.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46 years. For every 100 females there were 92.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.4 males.[29][30]

The median income for a household in the borough was $37,500, and the median income for a family was $47,031. Males had a median income of $36,375 versus $29,583 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,663. About 4.7% of families and 7.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 8.9% of those age 65 or over.[29][30]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The Borough of West Cape May has operated under the Walsh Act Commission form of government since 1948.[32] The Board of Commissioners consists of three members, who are elected at-large in non-partisan elections hled aspart of the November general election and serve four-year, concurrent terms of office.[5] Once the Commissioners take office, they divide up responsibility for the municipal departments, with each Commissioner serving as a Department Director and holds all the executive, administrative, judicial and legislative powers, with no single chief executive.

As of 2013, the borough's commissioners are Mayor Pamela M. Kaithern (Commissioner of Revenue and Finance), Deputy Mayor Peter C. Burke (Commissioner of Public Works, Parks and Public Property) and Carol E. Sabo (Commissioner of Public Affairs and Public Safety), who are serving terms of office that end December 31, 2013.[4][33] Sabo was appointed in early 2013 to fill the vacant seat of Ramsay Geyer, who resigned to move out of the borough.[34] Kaithern, Burke and Sabo were all re-elected in November 2013.[35]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

West Cape May is located in the 2nd Congressional District[36] and is part of New Jersey's 1st state legislative district.[8][37][38]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[39] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[40][41] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[42][43]

The 1st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jeff Van Drew (D, Dennis Township) and in the General Assembly by Bob Andrzejczak (D, Middle Township) and Sam Fiocchi (R, Vineland).[44] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[45] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[46]

Cape May County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year; At an annual reorganization held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as Director and another to serve as Vice-Director.[47] As of 2013, Cape May County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton (Middle Township, term ends December 31, 2013),[48] Freeholder Vice-Director Leonard C. Desiderio (Sea Isle City, 2015),[49] Kristine Gabor (Upper Township, 2014)[50] and Will Morey (Wildwood Crest, 2014),[51] along with the vacant seat of M. Susan Sheppard expiring in 2013 that was vacated after Sheppard was sworn in as County Surrogate.[47][52] The county's constitutional officers are Sheriff Gary Schafer (Ocean City, 2014),[53][54] Surrogate M. Susan Sheppard (Ocean City, 2015)[55] and County Clerk Rita Fulginiti (Ocean City, 2013).[56]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 776 registered voters in West Cape May, of which 249 (32.1%) were registered as Democrats, 284 (36.6%) were registered as Republicans and 241 (31.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[57]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 62.9% of the vote here (387 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received 35.0% (215 votes), with 615 ballots cast among the borough's 752 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.8%.[58] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 60.5% of the vote here (377 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 38.5% (240 votes), with 623 ballots cast among the borough's 818 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.2.[59]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 52.2% of the vote here (245 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 39.0% (183 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 6.0% (28 votes), with 469 ballots cast among the borough's 778 registered voters, yielding a 60.3% turnout.[60]

Education[edit]

The West Cape May Elementary School serves students in Prekindergarten through sixth grade. The school had an enrollment of 38 students in the 2010-11 school year,[61] making it one of the schools with the smallest enrollment in the state.[62]

For seventh through twelfth grades, public school students attend the schools of the Lower Cape May Regional School District, which serves students from Cape May City, Lower Township and West Cape May, along with students from Cape May Point who attend as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[63][64] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[65]) are Richard M. Teitelman School[66] (grades 7 and 8; 560 students) and Lower Cape May Regional High School[63] (grades 9-12; 1,063).[67]

Wineries[edit]

History[edit]

West Cape May Volunteer Fire Company

The Borough's history goes back to the time of the Lenape Native Americans and several buildings date to the Colonial period. The area has a rich agricultural history which continues to be celebrated each year with a summer farmers' market, and strawberry, tomato and lima bean festivals. It has been known as the "Lima Bean Capital of the World." The Lima Bean Festival is an annual event held in West Cape May, New Jersey, the "Lima Bean Capital of the World", and is the world's only such celebration. It is held annually on the Saturday of Columbus Day weekend in Wilbraham Park.[68]

West Cape May, once known as Eldredge, is one of the four jurisdictions that comprise Cape Island in Cape May County. West Cape May was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 17, 1884, from portions of Lower Township, based on the results of a referendum held two days earlier. The borough was reincorporated on April 11, 1890, and again on May 4, 1897.[18]

The Borough has reported ties to the Underground Railroad.[69]

From 1881 to 1931, the Hastings Goldbeating Company was located in the Borough employing women to pound one-inch strips of gold into gossamer-thin sheets used for decorative arts. Women still did the "booking" of gold leaf sheets until 1961. A plaque indicating the location of the factory can be found on Goldbeaten Alley. It was this business, along with real estate speculation and subdivision of the land, that led to the Borough's incorporation in 1884.[70]

The historic core of the Borough was placed on the National Register of Historic Places along with sections of the City of Cape May in 1976.[71]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Directory of Offices & Hours, Borough of West Cape May. Accessed April 29, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 8.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of West Cape May, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for West Cape May borough, Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 1. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for West Cape May borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for West Cape May, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 7, 2011.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for West Cape May, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 11, 2013.
  14. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  16. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  18. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 116. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  19. ^ Sandy NJ Weather Dashboard, Rutgers University. Accessed October 31, 2012.
  20. ^ New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control. New Jersey ABC list of dry towns (May 1, 2013)
  21. ^ Giordano, Rita. "More towns catching liquor-license buzz; Moorestown considers ending its dry spell", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 24, 2007. Accessed February 16, 2014.
  22. ^ Schaad, Jacob, Jr. "Bizarre History of Cape May > Wet or dry?", The Cape May Gazette, October 30, 2013. Accessed February 16, 2014. "Wildwood Crest, Ocean City, West Cape May and Cape May Point have opted to stay dry while the 12 other communities in the county still permit their people to lift a few."
  23. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Cape May County Municipalities, 1810 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed November 11, 2013.
  25. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 11, 2013.
  26. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  27. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  28. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for West Cape May borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for West Cape May borough, Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  31. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for West Cape May borough, Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  32. ^ The Commission Form of Municipal Government, p. 53. Accessed August 11, 2007.
  33. ^ 2013 Municpal Data Sheet, Borough of West Cape May. Accessed April 29, 2013.
  34. ^ Degener, Richard. "Sabo picked to fill unexpired term on West Cape May Borough Commission", The Press of Atlantic City, February 1, 2013. Accessed April 29, 2013. "Broadway resident Carol Sabo has been picked to fill the unexpired Borough Commission seat left open when Ramsey Geyer moved to Florida."
  35. ^ Staff. "UPDATE: 2013 General Election Results", Cape May County Herald, November 4, 2013. Accessed November 11, 2013. "Commissioner West Cape May: Pamela M Kaithern won West Cape May votes with 21 percent, Peter C Burke and Carole E Sabo tied for second with 20 percent of the votes."
  36. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 66, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  40. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  41. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  42. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  43. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  45. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ a b Freeholders Home Page, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  48. ^ Gerald M. Thornton, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  49. ^ Leonard C. Desiderio, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  50. ^ Kristine Gabor, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ Will Morey, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  52. ^ Cape May County Installs Returning Freeholder Leonard Desiderio and Names Director and Vice-Director, Cape May County, New Jersey, January 3, 2013. Accessed January 9, 2013. "Freeholder Leonard C. Desiderio, who was re-elected in November to serve a three-year term, was sworn in by Superior Court Judge J. Christopher Gibson.... Additionally at the meeting, Freeholder Gerald M. Thornton was re-elected Director of the Board and Freeholder Desiderio was elected Vice-Director."
  53. ^ Sheriff's Office, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Sheriff, Cape May County Sheriff. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ Surrogate, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ County Clerk's Office, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  57. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Cape May, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 16, 2012.
  58. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Cape May County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed October 16, 2012.
  59. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Cape May County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 16, 2012.
  60. ^ 2009 Governor: Cape May County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed October 16, 2012.
  61. ^ Data for West Cape May Elementary School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  62. ^ Procida, Lee. "Sea Isle, Long Beach Island are examples of how closing small, high-cost schools can be difficult, unpopular", The Press of Atlantic City, September 20, 2011. Accessed December 7, 2011. "The 10 smallest school districts in the state each have fewer than 100 students. Seven of them, all in South Jersey, are grappling with shrinking enrollment, aging buildings and rising property taxes.... West Cape May disregarded a recommendation to send students to Cape May, and instead started welcoming students from outside its borders through the state Public School Choice program. The first 16 choice students increased the prekindergarten-through-sixth-grade school’s enrollment to 58 students this year."
  63. ^ a b Lower Cape May Regional High School, Lower Cape May Regional School District. Accessed November 11, 2013. "Lower Cape May Regional High School is a four year public school that serves students from four communities including Cape May, Lower Township, West Cape May and Cape May Point."
  64. ^ Linehan, Mary. "Maud T. Abrams School", The Cape May Gazette, June 20, 2013. Accessed September 29, 2013. "The regional school district was formed in 1956 and now serves as a limited purpose regional school district educating students from Cape May, Cape May Point, West Cape May and Lower Township. Cape May Point students attend on a 'sending-receiving' basis."
  65. ^ School Data for the Lower Cape May Regional High School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 11, 2013.
  66. ^ Richard M. Teitelman School, Lower Cape May Regional School District. Accessed November 11, 2013.
  67. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Lower Cape May Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 11, 2013.
  68. ^ America's Best (and only) Lima Bean Festival, accessed March 7, 2007
  69. ^ Degener, Richard. "PHOTO EXHIBIT BRINGS WEST CAPE MAY'S PAST TO LIGHT", The Press of Atlantic City, December 28, 2003. Accessed October 17, 2012. "It has Mayflower descendants, a link to the Underground Railroad, buildings that go back to the 17th century and a factory where women once beat gold into sheets with hammers.Who says West Cape May has to live in the shadow of Cape May's rich historical past?"
  70. ^ Montet, Margaret. "Trolleying West of Cape May City", NJ.com, July 15, 2011. Accessed October 17, 2012. "So back to Goldbeaten Alley: from 1881 to 1931 workers at the Hastings Goldbeating Company cut gold bars into thin slices and then beat them paper-thin."
  71. ^ Cape May County: New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Historic Preservation Office, June 4, 2012. Accessed October 17, 2012.

External links[edit]