West Milford, New Jersey

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West Milford, New Jersey
Township
Township of West Milford
Motto: "A Clean Community"
Map of West Milford Township in Passaic County. Inset shows Passaic County's location in New Jersey
Map of West Milford Township in Passaic County. Inset shows Passaic County's location in New Jersey
Census Bureau map of West Milford, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of West Milford, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°05′47″N 74°23′58″W / 41.09652°N 74.39945°W / 41.09652; -74.39945Coordinates: 41°05′47″N 74°23′58″W / 41.09652°N 74.39945°W / 41.09652; -74.39945[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Passaic
Incorporated March 10, 1834
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council-Administrator)
 • Mayor Bettina Bieri (D, term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Nancy Gage[4]
 • Clerk Antoinette Battaglia[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 80.316 sq mi (208.018 km2)
 • Land 75.090 sq mi (194.483 km2)
 • Water 5.226 sq mi (13.534 km2)  6.51%
Area rank 10th of 566 in state
1st of 16 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 827 ft (252 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 25,850
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 26,520
 • Rank 96th of 566 in state
5th of 16 in county[12]
 • Density 344.3/sq mi (132.9/km2)
 • Density rank 467th of 566 in state
16th of 16 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07480[13]
Area code(s) 973 exchanges: 657, 728[14]
FIPS code 3403179460[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882315[17][2]
Website www.westmilford.org

West Milford is a township in Passaic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 25,850,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 560 (-2.1%) from the 26,410 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 980 (+3.9%) from the 25,430 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

History[edit]

West Milford started out as New Milford in what was then western Bergen County in the 18th century, having been settled by disenchanted Dutch from Milford, New Jersey (later renamed by the British as Newark). These same Dutch also built a town of New Milford in eastern Bergen County. When both New Milfords applied for post offices in 1828, a clerk in Washington, D.C. is said to have approved the other application first and assigned the name "West Milford" to the New Milford in western Bergen County in order to distinguish between the two locations.[19]

West Milford became a municipality by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 10, 1834, when it was formed from the westernmost portions of both Franklin Township and Saddle River Township, while the area was still part of Bergen County. On February 7, 1837, Passaic County was created from portions of both Bergen County and Essex County, with West Milford as the western end of the newly formed county.[20]

There are old name places in the township including Postville, Utterville, Corterville, Browns, Awosting, Echo Lake, Macopin, Charlotteburg (named after King George III's wife, Queen Charlotte and the town is now under the Charlotteburg Reservoir), Clinton (or sometimes called Clinton Furnace, now under the Clinton Reservoir, and the furnace still stands), Moe Mountain, Oak Ridge (a nameplace, but town is under the Oak Ridge Reservoir), Newfoundland, Apshawa, New City, and Smith Mills. Newfoundland is divided by the Pequannock River, which divides Passaic and Morris Counties; a small part of Newfoundland lies within Jefferson Township. A large part of the township, including the New City Village area, is reservoir property owned by the City of Newark in Essex County for their water supply. Prior to the Second World War, the township was a resort area with trains coming from New York City to stations at Charlotteburg, Newfoundland, Oak Ridge in the south and Hewitt (also known as Sterling Forest station) and Awosting in the north. Railroad service in the south was from the New Jersey Midland starting around the 1850s and in the north around the 1870s from the Montclair Railroad, out of Montclair, New Jersey and later the Erie Railroad (before their merger with the Lackawanna Railroad).

Guest playing croquet on the front lawn of Idylease circa 1903

Greenwood Lake is an interstate lake approximately 9 miles (14 km) long lying in both New Jersey and New York State. It was originally called Long Pond. It was dammed up to increase the size of the lake for water power down stream. During the resort era, several steamboats operated on the lake, the most famous and grand was the two deck steamer, Montclair. These steamboats met the trains and took passengers to the various resorts around the lake in both states.

There is a seaplane area on Greenwood Lake, a few large marinas and lakeside restaurants with docks. There is a public airport called Greenwood Lake Airport just south of the lake on top of a mountain ridge and has two landing strips; one is long enough to handle small jets.[21] There is one private airport in the township on a private estate.

After World War II and for the next 20 years the area underwent a major change from a resort area to year round residences. Before there were year-round houses, the summer residence of Cecil B. Demille was West Milford. Road maps of the 1950s showing the population on the backside said 2,000 winter and 10,000 summer.[22]

Jeremiah "Jerry" Goodfellow, a white German shepherd and the senior canine member of the New Jersey Search and Rescue was inducted into the Animal Hall of Fame in 2009.[23] Jerry lives with his owner and trainer, Sue Lavoie, on Union Valley Road in West Milford.

Geography[edit]

View of Wanaque Reservoir and Manhattan from a mountain near the West Milford-Ringwood border.

West Milford is located at 41°05′47″N 74°23′58″W / 41.09652°N 74.39945°W / 41.09652; -74.39945 (41.09652,-74.39945). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 80.316 square miles (208.018 km2), of which, 75.090 square miles (194.483 km2) of it is land and 5.226 square miles (13.534 km2) of it (6.51%) is water.[2][1]

Newfoundland and Green Pond[edit]

Newfoundland is a neighborhood of West Milford located along the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway (NYS&W Rwy, formerly NYS&W RR) tracks (freight service only) and Route 23. It is also a mailing address for Green Pond (just north of the Picatinny Arsenal in Rockaway Township, Morris County), a private lake community owned by Green Pond Corporation and Lake End Corporation, which lies in Rockaway Township where the Pequannock River divides Passaic County from Morris County.

The 2003 film The Station Agent was set, and filmed, largely in Newfoundland.[24] There was an early silent movie produced in the township at the Mine Hole in the Hewitt section of the township. A still photo of that movie is published in the township's 1984 sesquicentennial book entitled The Day the Earth Shook and the Sky Turned Red.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 2,108
1850 2,624 24.5%
1860 2,402 −8.5%
1870 2,660 10.7%
1880 2,591 −2.6%
1890 2,486 −4.1%
1900 2,112 −15.0%
1910 1,967 −6.9%
1920 1,763 −10.4%
1930 1,901 7.8%
1940 2,501 31.6%
1950 3,650 45.9%
1960 8,157 123.5%
1970 17,304 112.1%
1980 22,750 31.5%
1990 25,430 11.8%
2000 26,410 3.9%
2010 25,850 −2.1%
Est. 2013 26,520 [11][25] 2.6%
Population sources:
1840-1920[26] 1840[27] 1850-1870[28]
1850[29] 1870[30] 1880-1890[31]
1890-1910[32] 1910–1930[33]
1930–1990[34] 2000[35][36] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 25,850 people, 9,625 households, and 7,084 families residing in the township. The population density was 344.3 per square mile (132.9 /km2). There were 10,419 housing units at an average density of 138.8 per square mile (53.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 94.06% (24,315) White, 1.40% (362) Black or African American, 0.52% (134) Native American, 1.29% (334) Asian, 0.02% (4) Pacific Islander, 1.06% (273) from other races, and 1.66% (428) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.85% (1,512) of the population.[8]

There were 9,625 households, of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.4% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.4% were non-families. 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.12.[8]

In the township, 22.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 24.4% from 25 to 44, 33.4% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.7 years. For every 100 females there were 98.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.8 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $88,692 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,308) and the median family income was $102,410 (+/- $7,418). Males had a median income of $62,925 (+/- $3,467) versus $45,449 (+/- $2,738) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,905 (+/- $2,289). About 1.7% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.5% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.[37]

Same-sex couples headed 63 households in 2010, an increase from the 58 counted in 2000.[38]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 16,029 people, 9,190 households, and 7,186 families residing in the township. The population density was 350.1 people per square mile (135.2/km2). There were 9,909 housing units at an average density of 131.4 per square mile (50.7/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 95.08% White, 1.23% African American, 0.60% Native American, 1.02% Asian, 0.61% from other races, and 1.45% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.38% of the population.[35][36]

There were 9,190 households out of which 39.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.3% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.8% were non-families. 16.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.23.[35][36]

In the township the population was spread out with 27.2% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 33.6% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 8.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 100.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.4 males.[35][36]

The median income for a household in the township was $74,124, and the median income for a family was $80,264. Males had a median income of $51,105 versus $37,159 for females. The per capita income for the township was $28,612. About 2.6% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.1% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over.[35][36]

Commerce[edit]

West Milford businesses are represented by the West Milford Chamber of Commerce, an organization of business men and women that has worked to improve and enhance the business community in West Milford since it was established in 1949.[39]

A&P Supermarket[edit]

For decades, West Milford was rural with only a couple service stations, a couple small eating establishments, and a bank or two. The community was mostly residential. In the mid-1960s a then-average-sized 20,000-square-foot (1,900 m2) A&P Supermarket was built. During the late 1990s, A&P closed this original store and built a 60,000-square-foot (5,600 m2) supermarket a few miles away from the town center, next door to their former store.

Jungle Habitat[edit]

In 1972, Warner Brothers opened up a wildlife theme park called Jungle Habitat. This park consisted of a drive through safari and a small park with various shows. Initially, this brought huge tourist revenue to the township. Shortly after the park opened, a tourist being driven through the safari in a taxi was attacked by a lion on October 19, 1972, bringing negative publicity to the park.[40] The park was plagued by problems, including reports of dangerous animals escaping into West Milford.[41]

Jungle Habitat was a mixed blessing due to the amount of summer and weekend traffic into this rural area made up of small two lane roads. Jungle Habitat wanted to expand and become a huge amusement park, but residents concerned with excessive traffic voted this proposal down in 1976, which resulted in an abrupt closing and exit. Some of the animals in the wildlife park were subsequently moved to the then-recently established drive through safari at Great Adventure in Jackson Township. The former site of Jungle Habitat, in recent years has become a location for various Township activities such as the annual Fourth of July Fireworks display.

West Milford Shopping Center[edit]

With the loss of tax revenue and the needs of the residents in mind, the township approved the addition of more businesses. In the 1970s,[citation needed] a 45,000-square-foot (4,200 m2) ShopRite supermarket was built, and was expanded in the mid-1980s. Shortly thereafter, other businesses opened in the West Milford Shopping Center.

Near the ShopRite, several restaurants and fast food establishments were built, including a McDonald's restaurant as well as the Abby Theater, the first four-screen multiplex cinema in northern New Jersey. The Abby Theater was opened in 1976 and designed by Milton Herson for Music Makers Theaters, with a seating capacity of 1,400. The theater was named for Abby Leigh, wife of Mitch Leigh, then board chairman of Music Makers.[42] The Abby Theater closed down in 2009 after several unsuccessful business attempts, as the township did not have enough residents to keep the business in operation. It was slated to be demolished in order to make room for an expansion of the ShopRite supermarket in 2012.[43][44]

In May 2009, Eden Farms, an eight acre floral farm on Union Valley Road, became the first "preserved farm" in Passaic County. County officials used money from the Farmland Preservation Funds to purchase development rights to the farm.[45] Owners George and Diana Cluff initially began working on the agreement in 2007. The deal prevents the farm from being built upon.[46]

Law and government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The Township of West Milford operates under the Faulkner Act, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law, under the Mayor-Council-Administrator plan adopted as of January 1, 2004. This plan is described as a "Faulknerized" version of the borough form of government, which was added to the Faulkner Act as the fourth optional form of municipal government in 1981 by the New Jersey Legislature.[47]

The voters of West Milford Township adopted the Mayor-Council-Administrator Plan at a special election held on December 10, 2002,[48] making it one of only three municipalities that use this form.[49] Under the mayor-council-administrator plan, West Milford is governed by an elected mayor and council, with an appointed municipal administrator. The government consists of a Mayor and a Township Council made up of six council members, with all positions elected at-large as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Township Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[6]

The Mayor holds executive power under the mayor-council-administrator plan and presides over meetings of the Township Council but does not vote except to break a tie. The Township Council enacts ordinances and resolutions, establishes policies, prepares the annual budget and levies taxes. The Township Administrator in the mayor-council-administrator plan oversees each of the departments established by ordinance and directs the business affairs of the Township.[50]

As of 2014, the Mayor of West Milford Township is Democrat Bettina Bieri, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[51] Members of the Township Council are Council President Luciano "Lou" Signorino (R, 2016), Michele Dale (R, 2016), Ada Erik (R, 2014), Vivienne Erk (R, 2015), Michael Hensley (R, 2015) and CarlLa Horton (D, 2014).[52][53][54][55][56][57]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

West Milford is located in the 5th Congressional District[58] and is part of New Jersey's 26th state legislative district.[9][59][60]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[61] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[62][63] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[64][65]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 26th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph Pennacchio (R, Montville) and in the General Assembly by BettyLou DeCroce (R, Parsippany-Troy Hills) and Jay Webber (R, Morris Plains) and [66][67] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[68] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[69]

Passaic County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected to staggered three-year terms office on an at-large basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[70] As of 2013, Passaic County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce James (D, term ends December 31, 2014; Clifton),[71] Freeholder Deputy Director Theodore O. Best Jr. (D, 2014; Paterson),[72] John W. Bartlett (D, 2015; Wayne), Ronda Cotroneo (D, 2015; Ringwood), Terry Duffy (D, 2013; West Milford),[73] Pat Lepore (D, 2013; Woodland Park)[74] and Hector C. Lora (D, 2015; Passaic).[75][76] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Kristin M. Corrado (2014),[77] Sheriff Richard H. Berdnik[78] and Surrogate Bernice Toledo.[79]

Highlands protection[edit]

The Highlands Water Protection and Planning Act regulates development in portions of Oakland and Mahwah that are included in the New Jersey Highlands geographic region.

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 17,588 registered voters in West Milford, of which 3,397 (19.3% vs. 31.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 5,070 (28.8% vs. 18.7%) were registered as Republicans and 9,111 (51.8% vs. 50.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 10 voters registered to other parties.[80] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 68.0% (vs. 53.2% in Passaic County) were registered to vote, including 87.7% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.8% countywide).[80][81]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 7,672 votes here (56.5% vs. 37.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 5,515 votes (40.6% vs. 58.8%) and other candidates with 161 votes (1.2% vs. 0.8%), among the 13,575 ballots cast by the township's 18,016 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.3% (vs. 70.4% in Passaic County).[82] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 7,920 votes here (60.9% vs. 42.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 4,783 votes (36.8% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 109 votes (0.8% vs. 0.7%), among the 13,000 ballots cast by the township's 16,932 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.8% (vs. 69.3% in the whole county).[83]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 5,261 votes here (60.8% vs. 43.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 2,720 votes (31.5% vs. 50.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 525 votes (6.1% vs. 3.8%) and other candidates with 84 votes (1.0% vs. 0.9%), among the 8,646 ballots cast by the township's 17,322 registered voters, yielding a 49.9% turnout (vs. 42.7% in the county).[84]

Education[edit]

The West Milford Township Public Schools serve students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade. West Milford has six elementary schools (grades K-6), one middle school (grade 7-8), and one high school (grades 9-12). Further, the district supports a Center for Adult/Community Education. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's eight schools had an enrollment of 3,782 students and 280.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.47:1.[85] The school system has 361 certified staff members, over 50% of whom have a master's degree or higher. Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[86]) are the six K-6 elementary schools — Apshawa Elementary School[87] (269 students), Maple Road Elementary School[88] (325), Marshall Hill Elementary School[89] (314), Paradise Knoll Elementary School[90] (311), Upper Greenwood Lake Elementary School[91] (301) and Westbrook Elementary School[92] (399) — along with Macopin Middle School[93] (626) for grades 7-8 and West Milford High School[94] (1,237) for grades 9-12.[95][96]

Our Lady Queen of Peace was a Catholic school located in the community of Hewitt until it was closed in June 2010 by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson in the face of declining enrollment.[97] OLQP School celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2009, and had its Fourth Grade teacher, Lorraine Ford, named as a finalist for the 2008 New Jersey Nonpublic School Teacher of the Year award.[98]

The old Newfoundland, two-room schoolhouse was the Village Square Inn Restaurant until it closed in 2010. The old Hillcrest School is now the township's community center. The few one-room schoolhouses are all gone; the last one was the Hewitt School, destroyed by fire set by vandals (it had been the former Methodist church before a new, larger church was built).

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 198.30 miles (319.13 km) of roadways, of which 163.20 miles (262.64 km) were maintained by the municipality, 26.61 miles (42.82 km) by Passaic County and 8.49 miles (13.66 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[99]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service between the township and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 194 and 196 routes.[100]

The township provides its own bus service, on two routes. One that runs by Upper Greenwood Lake, and operates Monday-Friday, and one that runs between Oak Ridge & Newfoundland, which runs Wednesdays only.[101]

Sports[edit]

West Milford sports are overseen by the township department of Community Services and Recreation. The township has individual organizations that run each youth sports program, including Little League Baseball (WMLL), Police Athletic League (PAL) Basketball, PAL Soccer, West Milford-Star Athletics Cheerleading, Midget Football Association (WMMFA) Football, WMMFA Cheerleading, Amateur Baseball Association (WMABA) Baseball, and Girls Softball Association softball (WMGSA).[102]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with West Milford include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Administration, Township of West Milford. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  5. ^ Clerk's Office, Township of West Milford. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2006, p. 121.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of West Milford, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for West Milford township, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for West Milford township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 11, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for West Milford, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for West Milford, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 1, 2014.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  19. ^ Stewart, Holly. "Where we’re at", Suburban Trends, July 19, 2012. Accessed January 15, 2013. "In the 18th century, West Milford was part of Bergen County; it was comprised of the westernmost areas of Franklin and Saddle River townships. It was settled by Dutch who moved north from the place we now call Newark; as they had called their former home 'Milford,' they wished to call the new place 'New Milford,' but another faction of the same migrants had already done the same in a community near the Hudson River. When both locales petitioned for a post office in 1828, a federal clerk is said to have applied the adjective 'west' to one in order to distinguish them."
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 211. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  21. ^ Airport Information, Greenwood Lake Airport. Accessed January 15, 2013.
  22. ^ Hagstrom Maps
  23. ^ Local search dog inducted into hall of fame
  24. ^ DeStefano, Robert. "Choo choo choosing a home with personality", The West Milford Messenger, May 26, 2005. Accessed January 15, 2013. "They moved into the old Newfoundland building last July, and are hard at work to make it their comfortable, if slightly offbeat, living quarters.... In 2002 the building gained celebrity status when the independent film The Station Agent was filmed there."
  25. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2014.
  26. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 23, 2013.
  27. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed January 15, 2013.
  28. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 274, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed January 15, 2013. "West Milford is the most northerly and westerly township in the county, and contained in 1850, a population of 2,624; in 1860, 2,402; and in 1870, 2,660."
  29. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 140. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed January 15, 2013.
  30. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed January 15, 2013.
  31. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed January 15, 2013.
  32. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed January 15, 2013.
  33. ^ "Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 – Population Volume I", United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed January 15, 2013.
  34. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 – 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed January 15, 2013.
  35. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for West Milford township, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  36. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for West Milford township, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  37. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for West Milford township, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 29, 2012.
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