West Virginia Colored Children's Home

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West Virginia Colored Children's Home
University Heights Huntington WV.jpg
West Virginia Colored Children's Home, March 2009
West Virginia Colored Children's Home is located in West Virginia
West Virginia Colored Children's Home
Location 3353 US 60, near Huntington, West Virginia
Coordinates 38°24′34″N 82°22′25″W / 38.40944°N 82.37361°W / 38.40944; -82.37361Coordinates: 38°24′34″N 82°22′25″W / 38.40944°N 82.37361°W / 38.40944; -82.37361
Area 1 acre (0.40 ha)
Built 1923
Architectural style Classical Revival
NRHP Reference #

97001413

[1]
Added to NRHP November 13, 1997

West Virginia Colored Children's Home, also known as the West Virginia Home for Aged and Infirm Colored Men and Women and University Heights Apartments, was a historic school, orphanage, and sanatorium building located near Huntington, Cabell County, West Virginia. It was built in 1922-1923, and was a three story red brick building in the Classical Revival style. It was originally founded as the West Virginia Normal and Industrial School for Colored Children in Bluefield, West Virginia. This facility was the last of a series of buildings that were constructed to hold the state's first social institution exclusively serving the needs of African American residents. The West Virginia Colored Children's Home was closed in 1956 and the building was used as a rest home. The property transferred to Marshall University in 1961 and later it was converted to apartments.[2] The building was demolished on May 5, 2011. The location will be the future home of Huntington East Middle School.[3]

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  2. ^ Lisa Adkins (July 1997). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: West Virginia Colored Children's Home". State of West Virginia, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2011-07-23. 
  3. ^ Herald-Dispatch.com, Huntington, WV, May 6, 2011