West Virginia House of Delegates

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West Virginia House of Delegates
West Virginia Legislature
Coat of arms or logo
Type
Type
Term limits
None
History
New session started
January 12, 2013
Leadership
Tim Miley (D)
since June 18, 2013
Speaker pro tempore
Randy Swartzmiller (D)
since January 18, 2013
Majority Leader
Harry Keith White (D)
since 2013
Minority Leader
Tim Armstead (R)
since January 10, 2007
Structure
Seats 100
Composition of the West Virginia House of Delegates
Political groups

     Republican (47)[1]

     Democratic (53)
Length of term
2 years
Authority Article VI, West Virginia Constitution
Salary $20,000/year + per diem
Elections
Last election
November 6, 2012
(100 seats)
Next election
November 4, 2014
(100 seats)
Redistricting Legislative Control
Meeting place
WV-House-of-Delegate.jpg
House of Delegates Chamber
West Virginia State Capitol
Charleston, West Virginia
Website
West Virginia State Legislature

The West Virginia House of Delegates is the lower house of the West Virginia Legislature. Only three states—Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia—refer to their lower house as the House of Delegates.

Organization[edit]

Regular sessions begin with an organizational day on the second Wednesday of January of each year.[2] The length of regular session is limited to 60 calendar days.[2] The governor can call for special sessions.[2]

Delegates are elected for terms of two years.[2]

Legislative process[edit]

Delegates submit bill proposals to the Office of Legislative Services or legislative staff counsel, who draft the bill.[3] Once the bill draft is approved by the delegate, it is submitted for introduction.[3] Bills then undergo committee review and three readings in the house of origin and then the other house of the state legislature.[3]

An unusual feature of the West Virginia legislative process is that revenue bills can originate in either house.[2] The state constitution also prohibits multiple subjects in a single bill.[2]

If approved by both the West Virginia House of Delegates and the West Virginia Senate, bills are submitted to the governor, who may sign them into law or veto them.[2] State legislators can override the governor's veto of bills with a simple majority vote of both houses, unless the bill is a revenue bill, in which case two-thirds of the members elected to each house are required to override the governor's veto or line-item veto.[2]

Membership[edit]

Historical[edit]

Affiliation (Elected) Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Other
25th legislature (1900) 21 50 71 0
26th legislature (1902) 29 57 86 0
27th legislature (1904) 25 61 86 0
28th legislature (1906) 26 60 86 0
29th Legislature (1908) 25 61 86 0
30th legislature (1910) 63 23 86 0
31st legislature (1912) 33 53 86 0
32nd legislature (1914) 27 56 86 3 (Fusion Party)
33rd legislature (1916) 52 42 94 0
34th legislature (1918) 24 70 94 0
35th legislature (1920) 21 73 94 0
36th legislature (1922) 65 29 94 0
37th legislature (1924) 40 54 94 0
38th legislature (1926) 33 60 94 1 (Square Deal Party)
39th Legislature (1928) 31 63 94 0
40th legislature (1930) 68 26 94 0
41st legislature (1932) 79 15 94 0
42nd legislature (1934) 72 22 94 0
43rd legislature (1936) 82 12 94 0
44th legislature (1938) 70 24 94 0
45th legislature (1940) 74 20 94 0
46th legislature (1942) 50 44 94 0
47th legislature (1944) 65 29 94 0
48th legislature (1946) 56 38 94 0
49th Legislature (1948) 78 16 94 0
50th Legislature (1950) 67 27 94 0
51st legislature (1952) 67 33 100 0
52nd legislature (1954) 76 24 100 0
53rd legislature (1956) 58 42 100 0
54th legislature (1958) 85 15 100 0
55th legislature (1960) 82 18 100 0
56th legislature (1962) 76 24 100 0
57th legislature (1964) 91 9 100 0
58th legislature (1966) 65 35 100 0
59th Legislature (1968) 63 37 100 0
60th Legislature (1970) 68 32 100 0
61st legislature (1972) 57 43 100 0
62nd legislature (1974) 86 14 100 0
63rd legislature (1976) 91 9 100 0
64th legislature (1978) 74 26 100 0
65th legislature (1980) 78 22 100 0
66th legislature (1982) 87 13 100 0
67th legislature (1984) 73 27 100 0
68th legislature (1986) 78 22 100 0
69th Legislature (1988) 80 20 100 0
70th Legislature (1990) 74 26 100 0
71st legislature (1992) 79 21 100 0
72nd legislature (1994) 69 31 100 0
73rd legislature (1996) 74 26 100 0
74th legislature (1998) 75 25 100 0
75th legislature (2000) 75 25 100 0
76th legislature (2002) 69 31 100 0
77th legislature (2004) 68 32 100 0
78th legislature (2006) 72 28 100 0
79th Legislature (2008) 69 31 100 0
80th Legislature (2010) 65 35 100 0
81st Legislature First Session (2012) 54 46 100 0
81st Legislature Second Session(2013)[4] 53 47 100 0
Latest voting share 54% 47%

Current[edit]

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Vacant
End of 2011 session 65 35 100 0
Beginning of 2013 session 54 46 100 0
As of November 25, 2013 53 47 100 0

District organization[edit]

Prior to the 1970 Census, districts always respected county lines, with districts always consisting of either a single entire county, or several entire counties. Beginning with that year, the state began to use smaller geographic areas.

The 2000 House of Delegates' districting system divided the state into 58 districts that elect a varying number of members. The majority of districts, 35, were single-member districts. 23 districts are multi-member constituencies, varying from two to seven (the 30th District in Kanawha County) delegates.

In response to the 2010 Census, the Legislature again was required to redistrict. The Republican Party, and groups from the growing eastern panhandle and Putnam County were among those calling for 100 single member districts. Eventually redistricting was adopted by House Bill 201, which divided the state into 67 districts, of which 47 are one member districts, 11 two member districts, 6 three member districts, 2 four member districts, and one five member district. The old 30th District was abolished, however the five member district, covering most of Monongalia County, remains among the ten largest multi-member lower house districts in the country. These changes will take effect in with the 2012 election cycle. The state Supreme Court rejected legal challenges and no federal challenge was filed.

Speaker[edit]

The Speaker of the House is selected by its members. In contrast to the tradition of the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, the Speaker must vote unless excused. The House rules state that in some cases, he or she is not required to vote unless the House is equally divided, or unless his vote, if given to the minority, will make the division equal. In the latter case, the question is lost.

House of Delegates Leadership[edit]

Position Name Party District County
Speaker of the House Tim Miley Democratic 41 Harrison Co.
Speaker pro tempore Randy Swartzmiller Democratic 1 Hancock Co.
Majority Leader Harry Keith White Democratic 21 Mingo Co.
Minority Leader Tim Armstead Republican 32 Kanawha Co.
Majority Whip Mike Caputo Democratic 43 Marion Co.
Minority Whip Mitch Carmichael Republican 12 Jackson Co.

Members of the 81st West Virginia House of Delegates[edit]

[unreliable source?]

An updated list of the 81st legislature is available here.

District Representative Party County of Residence
1 Ronnie D. Jones Dem Hancock
Randy Swartzmiller
2 Phil Diserio[5] Brooke
Roy E. Givens
3 Ryan Ferns[6][7][8] Rep Ohio
Erikka Storch Rep
4 Michael T. Ferro Dem Marshall
- 5 Dave Pethtel Wetzel
6 Wm. Roger Romine Rep Tyler
7 Lynwood "Woody" Ireland Ritchie
8 William Anderson Wood
9 Anna Border[9] Rep
10 Tom Azinger Rep
John N. Ellem
Daniel Poling Dem
11 Bob Ashley Rep Roane
12 Steve Westfall Jackson
13 Helen Martin[10] Dem Putnam
Brady Paxton
14 Troy Andes Rep
Brian Savilla
15 Kevin J. Craig Dem Cabell
Carol Miller Rep
Jim Morgan Dem
16 Doug Reynolds
Kelli Sobonya Rep
Dale Stephens Dem
17 Timothy Kinsley Wayne
Don Perdue
18 Larry W. Barker Boone
19 Greg Butcher Logan
Rupert "Rupie" Phillips Jr.
Ralph Rodighiero
Josh Stowers Lincoln
20 Justin Marcum[11] Mingo
21 Harry Keith White
22 Daniel J. Hall Wyoming
Linda Goode Phillips
23 Clif Moore McDowell
24 Marty Gearheart Rep Mercer
25 Joe Ellington
John R. Frazier Dem
26 Gerald L. Crosier Monroe
27 Virginia Mahan Summers
Rick Moye Raleigh
John O'Neal Rep
Rick Snuffer
Linda Sumner
28 Thomas W. Campbell Dem Greenbrier
Ray Canterbury Rep
29 David Perry Dem Fayette
John Pino
Margaret Anne Staggers
30 Bonnie Brown Kanawha
Nancy Peoples Guthrie
Barbara Hatfield
Mark Hunt
Eric Nelson Rep
Doug Skaff, Jr. Dem
Danny Wells
31 Meshea Poore
32 Tim Armstead Rep
Patrick Lane
Ron Walters
33 David Walker Dem Clay
34 Brent Boggs Braxton
35 Pete Sigler Rep Nicholas
36 Joe Talbott Dem Webster
37 Denise L. Campbell Randolph
Bill Hartman
38 Peggy Donaldson Smith Lewis
39 Bill Hamilton Rep Upshur
40 Mary M. Poling Dem Barbour
41 Samuel J. "Sam" Cann Harrison
Ron Fragale
Richard J. Iaquinta
Tim Miley
42 Mike Manypenny Taylor
43 Mike Caputo Marion
Linda Longstreth
Tim Manchin
44 Anthony Barill Monongalia
Barbara Evans Fleischauer
Charlene Marshall
Amanda Pasdon Rep
45 Larry A. Williams Dem Preston
46 Stan Shaver
47 Harold Michael Hardy
48 Allen V. Evans Rep Grant
49 Gary G. Howell Mineral
50 Ruth Rowan Hampshire
51 Daryl E. Cowles Morgan
52 Larry D. Kump Berkeley
53 Randy Smith
54 Walter E. Duke
55 John Overington
56 Eric Householder Jefferson
57 Stephen Skinner Dem
58 Tiffany Lawrence
  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h West Virginia Constitution, West Virginia Legislature (accessed May 29, 2013)
  3. ^ a b c How a Bill Becomes Law, West Virginia State Legislature (accessed May 29, 2013)
  4. ^ http://wvmetronews.com/2013/11/25/ohio-county-delegate-turns-republican
  5. ^ appointed on January 23, 2012 by Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin following the resignation of Delegate Tim Ennis
  6. ^ following his April 20, 2012 arrest for DUI, "Ryan Ferns" announced to the media on April 26, 2012 that he would resign from the West Virginia House of Delegates; he subsequently rescinded that resignation announcement on May 11<http://www.news-register.net/page/content.detail/id/569861/Ferns-Not-Giving-up-W-Va--House----.html?nav=515>
  7. ^ "Ryan Ferns" Should Stay in the Legislature, Wheeling Intelligencer May 4, 2012, by Bob Miller Jr<http://www.theintelligencer.net/page/content.detail/id/569565.html
  8. ^ Respect "Ryan Ferns'" Decision to Resign, Wheeling News-Register May 5, 2012, by Mike Myer<http://news-register.net/page/content.detail/id/569605/Respecting-Ferns--Decision.html?nav=509
  9. ^ appointed on June 21, 2011 by Acting Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin following the death of Delegate Larry Border who died on June 8, 2011
  10. ^ appointed on May 17, 2011 by Acting Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin following the death of Delegate Dale Martin who died on May 4, 2011
  11. ^ appointed by Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin on Jan. 17, 2012 following the resignation of Delegate Steve Kominar

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]