Western Ojibwa language

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Western Ojibwa
Native to Canada
Region Manitoba, Saskatchewan
Native speakers
10,000  (2002)[1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3 ojw
Glottolog west1510[2]
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Western Ojibwa (also known as Nakawēmowin, Saulteaux, Plains Ojibway, Ojibway, Ojibwe) is a dialect of the Ojibwe language, a member of the Algonquian language family. It is spoken by the Saulteaux, a sub-Nation of the Ojibwe people, in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, Canada westward from Lake Winnipeg.[3] Saulteaux is the general term used in English for the name of the language by its speakers. Nakawēmowin is the general term in the language itself.[4]

Some speakers of Saulteaux inconsistently merge /ʃ/ and /s/ as /s/, possibly under the influence of Plains Cree.[5]


Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Western Ojibwa at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
  2. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Western Ojibwa". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  3. ^ Raymond G. Gordon, Jr, ed. 2005. Ethnologue: Languages of the World. 15th edition. Dallas: Summer Institute of Linguistics.
  4. ^ Cote, Margaret and Terry Klokeid, 1985, 2
  5. ^ Valentine, J. Randolph, 1994

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Cote, Margaret. 1984. Nahkawēwin: Saulteaux (Ojibway dialect of the Plains). Regina SK: Saskatchewan Indian Federated College.
  • Cote, Margaret and Terry J. Klokeid. 1985. Saulteaux verb book. Regina, SK: Saskatchewan Indian Federated College.
  • [Scott, Mary Ellen et al.] 1995. The Saulteaux Language Dictionary. Kinistin First Nation and Duval House Publishing. ISBN 1-895850-51-7
  • Valentine, J. Randolph. 1994. Ojibwe dialect relationships. PhD dissertation, University of Texas, Austin.
  • Voorhis, Paul. 1976. A Saulteaux (Ojibwe) phrase book based on the dialects of Manitoba. Brandon, MB: Department of Native Studies, Brandon University.

External links[edit]