Whassup?

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Whassup? was a commercial campaign for Anheuser-Busch Budweiser beer from 1999 to 2002. The first spot aired during Monday Night Football, December 20, 1999. The ad campaign was run worldwide and became a pop culture catchphrase. The phrase itself is a slur of the phrase "What's up?"

The commercials were based on a short film, entitled "True", written and directed by Charles Stone III, that featured Stone and several of his childhood friends – Fred Thomas, Paul Williams, Terry Williams, and Kevin Lofton. The characters sat around talking on the phone and saying "Whassup!" to one another in a comical way. The short was popular at a number of film festivals around the country and eventually caught the attention of creative director Vinny Warren and art director Chuck Taylor at the Chicago based ad agency DDB, who took the idea to August A. Busch IV, vice president of Anheuser-Busch, and signed Stone to direct Budweiser TV commercials based on the film. Scott Martin Brooks won the role of "Dookie" when Kevin Lofton declined to audition. "Whassup!" won the Cannes Grand Prix award and the Grand Clio award, among others. In May 2006, the campaign was inducted into the CLIO Hall of Fame.

In 2008, Stone made another version of the ad with the same cast called "Wassup 2008". The 2-minute short film was heavily critical of the presidency of George W. Bush and was a clear endorsement of the presidential campaign of Barack Obama.[1] The 2008 video was nominated foreign the "Favorite User Generated Video" award at the 35th People's Choice Awards.

In 2012, the Adam Sandler comedy That's My Boy used this line multiple times throughout the film.

The film Scary Movie parodied the ad throughout the film.

The Simpsons episodes The Bart Wants What It Wants and See Homer Run both feature the character Milhouse using the expression in an attempt to be cool.

The band Falling in Forward parodied the ad in the music video of the song "Good Girls, Bad Guys".[2]

References[edit]

Sources
Notes
  1. ^ Luning, Earnest (2008-10-24). "‘Wassup’ commercial returns with same cast, political twist". Retrieved 2008-11-26. 
  2. ^ Grant Trimboli (June 18, 2011). "MUSIC VIDEO: FALLING IN REVERSE – GOOD GIRLS BAD GUYS". www.underthegunreview.net.