Wheat germ oil

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Wheat germ oil in a clear glass vial

Wheat germ oil is extracted from the germ of the wheat kernel, which makes up only 2.5% by weight of the kernel [1] Wheat germ oil is particularly high in octacosanol - a 28-carbon long-chain saturated primary alcohol found in a number of different vegetable waxes.[2] Octacosanol has been studied as an exercise- and physical performance-enhancing agent. Very long chain fatty alcohols obtained from plant waxes and beeswax have been reported to lower plasma cholesterol in humans.[3] Wheat germ oil is also very high in vitamin E (255 mg/100g), and has the highest content of vitamin E of any food that has not undergone prior preparation or vitamin fortification.[4] As a cooking oil, wheat germ oil is strongly flavored, expensive and easily perishable.[1] Wheat germ oil contains the following fatty acids:[5][6]

Component g/100g
Linoleic acid (omega-6) 55
Palmitic acid 16
Oleic acid 14
Linolenic acid (omega-3) 7

Other uses of wheat germ oil have also been explored, including increasing blood flow and reaction time.[7] Further uses include treatment of certain skin conditions such as scarring and inflammation.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Kitchen Dictionary: Wheat germ". 
  2. ^ "Wheat Germ Oil (Octacosanol)". 
  3. ^ Hargrove et al.; Greenspan, P; Hartle, DK (03/01/2004). "Nutritional Significance and Metabolism of Very Long Chain Fatty Alcohols and Acids from Dietary Waxes". Experimental Biology and Medicine 229 (3): 215–26. PMID 14988513. 
  4. ^ "999 Foods Highest in Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol) (based on levels per 200 Calories)". 
  5. ^ "Nutritional Summary for Oil, wheat germ". 
  6. ^ Ola. A. Megahad and Omayma S. El Kinawy (2002). "Studies on the extraction of wheat germ oil by commercial hexane". Grasas y Aceites 53 (4): 414–418. Retrieved 2010-05-18. 
  7. ^ "Wheat Germ Oil". Nutros. Retrieved 2010-05-18. 
  8. ^ "Is Wheat Germ Oil Good for Scar Diminishing?". OilyOily. Retrieved 22 August 2013.