Wheelwright, Kentucky

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Wheelwright, Kentucky
City
Housing on South Main Street
Housing on South Main Street
Location of Wheelwright, Kentucky
Location of Wheelwright, Kentucky
Coordinates: 37°19′53″N 82°43′9″W / 37.33139°N 82.71917°W / 37.33139; -82.71917Coordinates: 37°19′53″N 82°43′9″W / 37.33139°N 82.71917°W / 37.33139; -82.71917
Country United States
State Kentucky
County Floyd
Incorporated February 6, 1917
Government
 • Type City Commission
 • Mayor Andy Wayne Akers
Area
 • Total 1.7 sq mi (4.5 km2)
 • Land 1.7 sq mi (4.5 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 1,138 ft (347 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 1,042
 • Density 598.0/sq mi (230.9/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 41669
Area code(s) 606
FIPS code 21-82272
GNIS feature ID 0506542

Wheelwright is a city in Floyd County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 1,042 at the 2000 census.

History[edit]

It was founded by the Elk Horn Coal Company in 1916 was named for the company's president at that time, Jere H. Wheelwright.[1]

Geography[edit]

Wheelwright is located at 37°19′53″N 82°43′9″W / 37.33139°N 82.71917°W / 37.33139; -82.71917 (37.331465, -82.719064).[2] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.7 square miles (4.4 km2), all land.

There is one way in and out of the city, via the Junction Bridge Located in Bypro, Ky 41612. Also referred to "Wheelwright Junction". state route 122. The original metal structure was replaced by concrete in 1959. In front of Hall's Store, soon to house Bypro post office. A common meeting place for area youths.[3][citation needed].This bridge is now known as the Timothy Hall Memorial Bridge.[4] The bridge was named in honor of City Commissioner Timothy Hall who died in a car accident.[5]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 506
1930 1,822 260.1%
1940 2,027 11.3%
1950 2,037 0.5%
1960 1,518 −25.5%
1970 793 −47.8%
1980 865 9.1%
1990 721 −16.6%
2000 1,042 44.5%
2010 780 −25.1%
Est. 2013 859 [6] 10.1%
U.S. Decennial Census

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 1,042 people, 203 households, and 146 families residing in the city. The population density was 598.0 people per square mile (231.2/km²). There were 236 housing units at an average density of 135.4 per square mile (52.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 63.15% White, 34.74% African American, 0.10% Asian, 1.25% from other races, and 0.77% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.73% of the population.

There were 203 households out of which 36.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.7% were married couples living together, 16.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.6% were non-families. 26.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the city the population was spread out with 13.7% under the age of 18, 22.7% from 18 to 24, 43.4% from 25 to 44, 13.6% from 45 to 64, and 6.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 290.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 330.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $14,808, and the median income for a family was $20,625. Males had a median income of $30,625 versus $16,563 for females. The per capita income for the city was $5,367. About 36.8% of families and 40.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 47.0% of those under the age of 18 and 11.6% of those ages 65 and older.

Government[edit]

Wheelwright is governed by a city commission form of government. Its current mayor is Andy Akers. The city commission consists of Bobby Akers., Joe Stewart, Vernon Smallwood, and Don Hall.[8]

Education[edit]

Floyd County's public schools are operated by Floyd County Schools. Most students residing in the city of Wheelwright attend:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rennick, Robert M. (1988). "Place Names". Kentucky Place Names. Lexington, Kentucky: The University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 0-8131-0179-4. 
  2. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ source: life long resident Mike Hall
  4. ^ Turner, J. "SJR 25 (BR 1024)". Retrieved 17 March 2013. 
  5. ^ Lawson, Jennifer. "Commissioner killed in wreck". Retrieved 17 March 2013. 
  6. ^ Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 Population Estimates U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-05-29
  7. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ Kentucky Secretary of State-Land Office Retrieved on 2010-04-17