When the Red, Red Robin (Comes Bob, Bob, Bobbin' Along)

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"When the Red, Red Robin (Comes Bob, Bob, Bobbin' Along)" was a 1926 popular song written by songwriter Harry M. Woods. The song was an instant hit for singers like "Whispering" Jack Smith, Cliff Edwards and the Ipana Troubadors. Al Jolson, however, had the most success with his recording, which reached #1 on the Billboard charts.

Jolson also performed the song on the 1926 sound-on-disc short film A Plantation Act.

The song became the signature song for singer and actress Lillian Roth, who performed it often during the height of her musical career from the late 1920s to the late 1930s. It was later performed by Susan Hayward, playing Roth, in the 1955 biographical film about Roth, I'll Cry Tomorrow.

The song was recorded in 1953 by Doris Day, and again reached considerable success on the charts. Bing Crosby recorded the tune on radio in 1956.

Also in the 1950s, a version was released by Peter Pan Records, with "Rock-a-Bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody" on the reverse side of the single.

The song helped inspire the name of the American casual dining restaurant chain Red Robin: the owner of the original restaurant sang in a barbershop quartet which frequently sang the song, and in the 1940s he renamed his restaurant "Sam's Red Robin".[1]

The English football club Charlton Athletic play Billy Cotton's version of the song as the team come out on to the pitch at their home ground The Valley.

The song is sung by Cindy Williams' character, Ann, during a conversation in the 1974 Francis Ford Coppola film The Conversation.

The song appears in the 1952 film Has Anybody Seen My Gal?, sung by Charles Coburn, Gigi Perreau, and Lynn Bari.

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