Where Do the Children Play?

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"Where Do the Children Play?"
Song by Cat Stevens now known as Yusuf Islam from the album Tea for the Tillerman
Released November 23, 1970
Genre Folk rock
Label Island Records
A&M Records (USA)
Writer Cat Stevens Now known as Yusuf Islam
Producer Paul Samwell-Smith
Tea for the Tillerman track listing
  1. "Where Do the Children Play?"
  2. "Hard Headed Woman"
  3. "Wild World"
  4. "Sad Lisa"
  5. "Miles from Nowhere"
  6. "But I Might Die Tonight"
  7. "Longer Boats"
  8. "Into White"
  9. "On the Road to Find Out"
  10. "Father and Son"
  11. "Tea for the Tillerman"

Where Do the Children Play? is a song by British folk-rock musician Cat Stevens, now known as Yusuf Islam. It was the opening track of the album Tea for the Tillerman, released in 1970.[1]

The song reflects awareness of the turmoil of the late 1960s and the issues involved: war, urban sprawl, poverty, ecological disaster, and the future of humankind.[citation needed] The same themes and concerns are repeated later in many of his songs.[citation needed]

The song was used for the soundtrack of the 1971 movie, Harold and Maude. The film features the song during a scene where lead character Harold is driving past a military graveyard, panning out to show a vast number of little tiny white graves, thus underscoring the point of the song.

In 2005, Stevens recorded it with Dolly Parton on the Dolly Parton album Those Were the Days.

Mexican rock band Maná released a Spanish album with a similar name, possibly influenced by the Cat Stevens song, entitled ¿Dónde Jugarán los Niños? (Where will the children play?). Another Mexican band, Molotov, released an album called ¿Dónde Jugarán las Niñas? (Where will the girls play?), parodying the previous album by Maná.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Albums". YUSUF Islam. Retrieved 2012-01-08. 

External links[edit]