Whiskey Girl

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"Whiskey Girl"
Single by Toby Keith
from the album Shock'n Y'all
Released March 22, 2004
Recorded 2003
Genre Country
Length 3:59
Label DreamWorks
Writer(s) Toby Keith, Scotty Emerick
Producer(s) James Stroud, Toby Keith
Certification Gold (RIAA)
Toby Keith singles chronology
"American Soldier"
(2003)
"Whiskey Girl"
(2004)
"Hey Good Lookin'"
(2004)

"Whiskey Girl" is a song co-written and performed by American country music singer Toby Keith. It was released in March 2004 as the third and final single from the album, Shock'n Y'all. The song reached the top of the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart on in July 2004. A live version is included on the deluxe edition of his 2012 album Hope on the Rocks. Keith wrote the song with Scotty Emerick.

Content[edit]

The song's narrator describes his girlfriend as his "little whiskey girl." In the video she is the object of fantasy for a mechanic at an autoshop Keith is visiting.[1]

Music video[edit]

Amy Weber, a WWE Diva, appeared in the music video, which was directed by Michael Salomon. The video was released on March 27, 2004.

Chart performance[edit]

"Whiskey Girl" debuted at number 59 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks for the week of March 20, 2004.

Chart (2004) Peak
position
US Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[2] 1
US Billboard Hot 100[3] 31

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (2004) Position
US Country Songs (Billboard)[4] 30
Preceded by
"If You Ever Stop Loving Me"
by Montgomery Gentry
Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks
number-one single

July 10, 2004
Succeeded by
"Live Like You Were Dying"
by Tim McGraw

References[edit]

  1. ^ Randall, Alice; Carter Little; Courtney Little (2006). My Country Roots: The Ultimate MP3 Guide to America's Original Outsider Music. Thomas Nelson, Inc. p. 92. ISBN 1-59555-860-8. 
  2. ^ "Toby Keith Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot Country Songs for Toby Keith.
  3. ^ "Toby Keith Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot 100 for Toby Keith.
  4. ^ "Best of 2004: Country Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 2004. Retrieved July 11, 2012. 

External links[edit]