White-faced Ibis

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White-faced Ibis
Breeding plumage
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Subclass: Neornithes
Infraclass: Neognathae
Superorder: Neoaves
Order: Ciconiiformes
Family: Threskiornithidae
Genus: Plegadis
Species: P. chihi
Binomial name
Plegadis chihi
(Vieillot, 1817)
Synonyms

Plegadis falcinellus chihi
Plegadis falcinellus mexicana

The White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi) is a wading bird in the ibis family Threskiornithidae.

Winter Quintana, Texas

This species breeds colonially in marshes, usually nesting in bushes or low trees. Its breeding range extends from the western USA south through Mexico, as well as from southeastern Brazil and southeastern Bolivia south to central Argentina, and along the coast of central Chile. Its winter range extends from southern California and Louisiana south to include the rest of its breeding range.

Description[edit]

Non-breeding plumage

The White-faced Ibis is very similar to the Glossy Ibis in its non-breeding plumages, but it tends to be slightly smaller and the plumage color is somewhat warmer. Breeding adults have a pink bare face bordered with white feathers (rather than a bluish bare face with no bordering feathers), a grey bill, and brighter colored, redder legs. Adults have red eyes year-round, whereas Glossy Ibises have dark eyes. Juveniles of the two species are nearly identical.[2]

Distribution[edit]

The White-faced Ibis occurs in Canada, the United States, Central America and the southern half of South America.[1] In 2012, the total population size was estimated to be 1.2 million individuals, and increasing. The IUCN rates it as being of "Least Concern".[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c BirdLife International (2012). "Plegadis chihi". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ "White-faced Ibis". Birding Hawaii. 2004. Retrieved 2013-12-23. 
  • The Sibley Guide to Birds, David Sibley, 2000, ISBN 0-679-45122-6
  • Askwiki.com, For more information!

External links[edit]