White widow (Cannabis)

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White Widow is a cannabis strain developed in The Netherlands by seed breeder known as Shantibaba who owns and runs Mr. Nice Seeds and the CBD Crew and it's known for its abundance of white trichomes and high potency.[1] White Widow has been reported to leave the user with a relaxed feeling. It, like most indica marijuana varieties, is an appetite enhancer. However, being a cross between sativa and indica (60% Indica, 40% Sativa) it also has the sativa quality of mood enhancement - bringing on an interest in activities one may not normally enjoy. The variety won the Cannabis Cup in 1995.[2][3][4] White Widow grown in Amsterdam is known to contain up to 20% of the active ingredient THC. White Widow buds are covered in crystals, giving it an almost snowy look. As of late as 2011, it sells for approximately 8 Euros per gram in The Netherlands.[5] In San Jose and Colorado Springs, it is available from dispensaries for Medical Marijuana patients for a donation of $8 US per gram.[citation needed]

White Widow is a compact plant of medium height. The buds only develop a few amber-colored hairs, but the high crystalline resin production of this plant has become well known.

White Widow is a strain that is relatively easy to grow to an experienced botanist, especially in Europe because of its resistance to mold and colder climates. The original White Widow was created using a pure Sativa land race from Brazil[2] and was pollinated by an Indica-hybrid from southern India.


References[edit]

  1. ^ Asthana, Anushka (January 18, 2004). "So just how potent are our street drugs?". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved September 21, 2009. 
  2. ^ a b "White Widow Strain Information". www.seedsmarijuana.net. Retrieved 31 May 2014. 
  3. ^ Hager, Steven (February 9, 2009). "Cannabis Cup Winners". High Times. Retrieved September 21, 2009. 
  4. ^ Bennett, Oliver (August 11, 1996). "wot? no dope?". The Independent. Independent News & Media. Retrieved September 21, 2009. 
  5. ^ Gullo, Karen (June 7, 2005). "Marijuana Clubs in San Francisco Unfazed by High Court's Ruling". Bloomberg L.P. Retrieved September 21, 2009.