Whitefish Range

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Whitefish Range
Whitefish-MacDonald Range
Glacier mountain range.jpg
Whitefish Range from Whitefish, Montana
Highest point
Peak Mount Doupe
Elevation 8,740 ft (2,660 m)
Dimensions
Length 76 mi (122 km) North-south
Width 58 mi (93 km) East-west
Area 1,726 sq mi (4,470 km2)
Geography
Countries United States and Canada
States Montana and British Columbia
Settlements Columbia Falls, Montana and Eureka, Montana
Borders on North Fork Flathead River and Kootenay River

The Whitefish Range is a mountain range stretching north-south from British Columbia, Canada to Montana, United States. It is about 76 miles (122 km) long and 58 miles (93 km) wide. Water flowing from its east side drains down the North Fork Flathead River and its west side drains into the Whitefish River, both part of the Columbia River drainage basin.[1]

The mountain range is located north of Columbia Falls north of Flathead Lake, and east of Eureka. The Flathead River separates it from the Swan Range, which would otherwise continue the Whitefish Range southwards. The Whitefish Range, however, is not particularly high. The highest peaks in the U.S. are Nasukoin Mountain, 8,086 feet (2,465 m), and Lake Mountain, 7,814 feet (2,382 m).[1] In Canada, the highest peak is Mount Doupe, 8,740 feet (2,660 m).[2]

The Whitefish Range is located west of Glacier National Park and consists mostly of wilderness. It supports a variety of conifers including western red cedar and Douglas fir, and large mammals including black bears, grizzly bears, mountain lions, and other species of fish, small mammals, and amphibians.[2]

Part of the U.S. portion of the range is protected in the 34,000-acre Ten Lakes Wilderness Study Area on the Kootenai National Forest. Ten Lakes WSA contains more than 89 miles of trails, many mountain lakes, alpine peaks, and excellent views into Canada.[3]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Whitefish-MacDonald Range". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2009-09-15. 
  2. ^ a b "Whitefish Range". SummitPost. June 8, 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-15. 
  3. ^ "Ten Lakes Scenic Area". Retrieved 12 December 2011.