Whitey Ford Sings the Blues

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For other uses, see Whitey Ford (disambiguation).
Whitey Ford Sings the Blues
Studio album by Everlast
Released September 8, 1998
Recorded 1997-1998
Genre East Coast hip hop, blues rock
Length 54:59
Label Tommy Boy/Warner Bros. Records
Producer Everlast
Dante Ross
John Gamble
Everlast chronology
Forever Everlasting (1990) Whitey Ford Sings the Blues
(1998)
Eat at Whitey's
(2000)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars [1]

Whitey Ford Sings the Blues (1998) is the second solo album by singer-songwriter-emcee Everlast, and the first one following his departure from House of Pain. It was released a full eight years after his solo debut (Forever Everlasting) and after he had a major heart attack.

Whitey Ford Sings the Blues was both a commercial and critical success (selling more than 3 million copies). It was hailed for its blend of rap with acoustic and electric guitars, developed by Everlast together with producers Dante Ross and John Gamble (aka SD50). The album's genre-crossing lead single "What It's Like" proved to be his most popular and successful song, although the follow-up single, "Ends", also reached the rock top 10. "Painkillers" was included on the soundtrack to the 1999 Jet Li film Black Mask. The song "Death Comes Callin'" features a riff from "Gotta Learn How to Dance" by Fatback Band.

Track listing[edit]

  1. "The White Boy Is Back (Skit)" – 0:44
  2. "Money (Dollar Bill - Featuring Sadat X)" – 3:16
  3. "Ends" – 4:24
  4. "What It's Like" – 5:03
  5. "Get Down" – 3:59
  6. "Sen Dog (Skit)" – 0:15
  7. "Tired" – 2:22
  8. "Hot to Death" – 3:49
  9. "Painkillers" – 3:23
  10. "Prince Paul (Skit)" – 0:58
  11. "Praise the Lord" – 3:05
  12. "Today (Watch Me Shine - Featuring Bronx Style Bob)" – 5:02
  13. "Guru (Skit)" – 0:17
  14. "Death Comes Callin'" – 4:16
  15. "Funky Beat (Featuring Casual And Sadat X)" – 4:04
  16. "The Letter" – 2:05
  17. "7 Years" – 4:05
  18. "Next Man" – 3:52

References[edit]

  1. ^ Henderson, Alex. Whitey Ford Sings the Blues at AllMusic