Wicked Campers

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Toyota TownAce from Wicked Campers.

Wicked Campers is an Australian camper van rental company based in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.[1] The company also has outlets in other parts of Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, North America, South Africa and South America.

Wicked Campers market their product towards younger drivers and backpackers. Each van features a spray painted design, often featuring pop culture references and politically incorrect slogans.

Controversy[edit]

Wicked have continually attracted media attention in Australia and New Zealand for their use of offensive slogans on their painted vans.[2][3][4] [5] [6] Between 2008 and 2012 the Australian Advertising Standards Board upheld numerous complaints about offensive slogans or other advertising.[7]

In 2010, according to the Daily Telegraph, the Queensland government released a report saying 90% of Wicked vans in the state were unroadworthy. Wicked took the vans off the road but claimed that the vans were safe.[8] It appears, however, that the number of vans that were taken off the road is a point of contention. [9]

In 2011, various media sources reported that Wicked Campers received criticism from animal rights activists for placing stickers inside their Australian vans with the text "Kangaroos, run the fuckers down." Wicked stated the stickers were to promote road safety and prevent vehicular rollovers. [10]

In November 2011 it was reported that the company trading as Wicked Campers had paid fines of AUD$26,400 for 'misleading advertising' regarding camper van hire fees.[11] According to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, the company had 'failed to specify the single total price payable for the campervans and failed to adequately disclose certain mandatory fees and charges'.[12]

Charity Involvement[edit]

Wicked Campers has partnered with Mates Race [13] and Book Aid International [14] to raise money for charity. One of their vehicles was also used on the Australian leg of a couple's road trip to raise money for Cool Earth and One World Futbol. [15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Connolly, John (18 April 2009). "No business like slogan business". The Australian. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  2. ^ "Wicked slogan 'goes too far'". Stuff.co.nz. NZPA. 5 May 2010. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  3. ^ Lawrence, Jessica (20 July 2008). "Campervan slogans are too Wicked for words". The Sunday Mail. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  4. ^ "Controversial campervan found". The Cairns Post. 21 July 2008. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  5. ^ Gough, Anthony. "Naked Truth on Wicked Campers". Courier Mail. Retrieved July 2012. 
  6. ^ Bastow, Clem. "Why women should boycott Wicked Campervans". Daily Life. Retrieved 9 February 2013. 
  7. ^ "Advertising Standards Board Determinations". Retrieved 9 February 2013. 
  8. ^ Dale, Amy (11 January 2010). "Tourists label Wicked campervans 'death traps'". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  9. ^ "The Wicked Chronicles". Retrieved July 2012. 
  10. ^ Schefe, Yolande (6 February 2011). "Wicked Campers rapped for stickers encouraging drivers to run down kangaroos". The Sunday Mail. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  11. ^ "Wicked Campers fined over misleading ads". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 9 February 2013. 
  12. ^ "Wicked Campers pays infringement notices". Retrieved 9 February 2013. 
  13. ^ "Wicked Campers partners with Mates Race". Retrieved 5 February 2014. 
  14. ^ "Wicked Camper on the road in aid of Book Aid International". Retrieved 5 February 2014. 
  15. ^ "Arriving in Australia". Retrieved 5 February 2014. 


External links[edit]