Wickedness

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Wickedness, is generally considered a synonym for evil or sinfulness. Among theologians and philosophers, it has the more specific meaning of evil committed consciously and of free will.[1]

For example, as characterized by Martin Buber in his 1952 work Bilder von Gut und Böse (translated as Good and Evil: Two Interpretations), "The first stage of evil is 'sin,' occasional directionlessness. Endless possibility can be overwhelming, leading man to grasp at anything, distracting and busying himself, in order to not have to make a real, committed choice. The second stage of evil is 'wickedness,' when caprice is embraced as a deformed substitute for genuine will and becomes characteristic."[2] Wickedness connotes blameworthiness.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rosenbaum, Ron (September 30, 2011). "The End of Evil?". Slate. Retrieved 2011-10-10. 
  2. ^ Scott, Sarah (July 9, 2010). "Martin Buber (1878—1965)". Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. University of Tennessee at Martin. ISSN 2161-0002. Retrieved 2011-10-10. 
  3. ^ Williams, Garrath (March 9, 2009). "Responsibility". Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. University of Tennessee at Martin. ISSN 2161-0002. Retrieved 2011-10-10. 

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