List of Pokémon (1–51)

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The Pokémon franchise has 719 (as of the release of Pokémon X and Y) distinctive fictional species classified as the titular Pokémon. This is a selected listing of 51 of the Pokémon species, originally found in the Red and Green versions, arranged as they are in the main game series' National Pokédex.

Bulbasaur[edit]

Number: 001 Type: Grass/Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Ivysaur

Bulbasaur, known as フシギダネ (Fushigidane) in Japan, are small, squat reptilian and frog Pokémon that move on all four legs, and have light blue-green bodies with darker blue-green spots. As a Bulbasaur undergoes evolution into Ivysaur and then later into Venusaur, the bulb on its back blossoms into a large flower.[1] In the Pokémon anime, the character Ash Ketchum has a Bulbasaur who is portrayed as being brave but also stubborn. His Bulbasaur is also shown not wanting to evolve into Ivysaur.

Ivysaur[edit]

Number: 002 Type: Grass/Poison Evolves from: Bulbasaur Evolves into: Venusaur

Ivysaur, known as フシギソウ (Fushigisō Fushigisou?) in Japan, is the second stage following Bulbasaur, one of the three starting Pokémon available to players in Pokémon Red and Blue and their various remakes. It eventually becomes its final form, Venusaur. Aside from becoming taller and heavier than Bulbasaur, its trademark bulb becomes a pink flower bud, and four leaves now appear at the base of this bud. In Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Ivysaur is a playable character, under the command of the Pokémon Trainer.[2] The Trainer also has Squirtle and Charizard, all three of which can be switched between; unlike the other fighters, these Pokémon become fatigued and consequently weaker, and must be switched out long enough to recover.[2] GamesRadar editor Brett Elston called Ivysaur the "middle child" of the Bulbasaur evolutionary line, due to it not being as cute as Bulbasaur, yet not as intimidating as Venusaur. However, he described him as a necessary step in the line.[3] An editor for UGO Networks called Ivysaur lame in Brawl and that while it was better than Squirtle it was inferior to Charizard.[4] Salon's Nick Gillespie called Ivysaur "a blue-green toad with what looks to be a garlic clove on its back".[5] IGN's Lucas M. Thomas and Matt Casamassina wrote that because Chikorita used Razor Leaf in Brawl, Ivysaur likely won't, which they found strange since Ivysaur is "an older and more venerable monster" than Chikorita.[6] Thomas wrote that Ivysaur was proof that four-legged characters can work in Super Smash Bros.[7] IGN's Richard George wrote that Ivysaur in Brawl is "likely to be underestimated at first, but it has some great moves when used properly".[8] IGN editor Lucas M. Thomas wrote it was less recognized than Bulbasaur and Venusaur until it appeared in Brawl. He wrote that it was a "beast to deal with" and is "not too shabby for a monster formerly only known as an in-betweener".[9]

Venusaur[edit]

Number: 003 Type: Grass/Poison Evolves from: Ivysaur Evolves into: Mega Venasaur(X&Y only) with Mega stone

Venusaur, known as フシギバナ (Fushigibana) in Japan is the final stage in Bulbasaur evolution after Ivysaur. The seed on Bulbasaur and Ivysaur's backs eventually blooms into a huge flower.

Charmander[edit]

Number: 004 Type: Fire Evolves from: None Evolves into: Charmeleon

Charmander, known as ヒトカゲ (Hitokage) in Japan, are small, bipedal lizard-like Pokémon with blue eyes and orange skin. Its tail is constantly burning and reflects its physical health and emotions.[10][11] If the flame were to ever go out, the Charmander would die.[12] When Charmander receives enough experience from battles, it evolves into Charmeleon, and later Charizard. It appears in the Pokémon anime as a major component of series star Ash Ketchum's team. Once it evolves into Charmeleon, it becomes disobedient to Ash.

Charmeleon[edit]

Number: 005 Type: Fire Evolves from: Charmander Evolves into: Charizard

Charmeleon, known as リザード (Rizādo Lizardo?) in Japan, is the evolved form of Charmander, and the stage which precedes Charizard. It has red skin and a flaming tail. In the anime, Charmeleon evolves from Charmander and immediately becomes disobedient towards Ash. It evolves into Charizard, which has a similar temperament towards Ash.

Charizard[edit]

Number: 006 Type: Fire/Flying, Dragon (Mega Charizard X) Evolves from: Charmeleon Evolves into: None

Charizard, known as リザードン (Rizādon Lizardon?) in Japan, is the evolved form of Charmeleon, which is the evolved form of Charmander. Whereas its pre-evolutions Charmander and Charmeleon are ground-bound lizard like creatures, Charizard resembles a large traditional European dragon.[13]

Squirtle[edit]

Number: 007 Type: Water Evolves from: None Evolves into: Wartortle

Squirtle, known as ゼニガメ (Zenigame) in Japan, is a blue turtle Pokémon which is capable of shooting water from its mouth. It eventually evolves into Wartortle and then Blastoise.

Wartortle[edit]

Number: 008 Type: Water Evolves from: Squirtle Evolves into: Blastoise

Wartortle, known as カメール (Kamēru Kameil?) in Japan, is a turtle Pokémon and the evolved form of Squirtle. Wartortles are identified as more tough than its predecessor.[14] It will eventually evolve into Blastoise. GamesRadar editor Brett Elston compared it to Ivysaur and Charmeleon, describing it as a pit stop to a more powerful Pokémon.[15]

Blastoise[edit]

Number: 009 Type: Water Evolves from: Wartortle Evolves into: None

Blastoise, known as カメックス (Kamekkusu Kamex?) in Japan, is a giant turtle Pokémon and the final evolution in the Squirtle line. It features two water cannons protruding from its shell above its arms.

Caterpie[edit]

Number: 010 Type: Bug Evolves from: None Evolves into: Metapod

Caterpie (キャタピー Kyatapī?) is a Pokémon based on the design of the caterpillar of the Swallowtail butterfly. Caterpie is the smallest of all the original Pokémon, and grows in size by shedding its skin. Eventually, Caterpie evolves into Metapod, and then Butterfree.

Metapod[edit]

Number: 011 Type: Bug Evolves from: Caterpie Evolves into: Butterfree

Metapod, known as トランセル (Transel?), is a pupal Pokémon found in the wild early in the Kanto and Johto regions, of which its larval form is the caterpillar-like Caterpie. They evolve into the butterfly-like Butterfree.

Butterfree[edit]

Number: 012 Type: Bug/Flying Evolves from: Metapod Evolves into: None

Butterfree (バタフリー Batafurī?) is a butterfly-like Pokémon that have hatched from their pupal Metapod forms. It has large veined wings which are white with black markings. These markings can help distinguish male and female individuals.

Weedle[edit]

Number: 013 Type: Bug/Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Kakuna

Weedle, known as ビードル (Bīdoru Beedle?) in Japan, is a spiked insect Pokémon. It evolves into Kakuna and then Beedrill. It is capable of poisoning its opponents using a poisonous barb on its head. Loredana Lipperini, author of Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi, commented that Weedle's stinger made it appear more wild-like than Caterpie.[16] San Antonio-Express News editor Susan Yerkes described Weedle as "disgustingly cute".[17] Destructoid's Jim Sterling included it in his list of 30 "rubbish" Pokémon in Pokémon Red and Blue. He called it a "centipede thing" and criticized it for its "shitty, lazy facial features" such as what he calls the "'whack a horn on it' mentality of Goldeen and Seel". He added that while Caterpie resembles a caterpillar, Weedle is a "joke".[18] IGN included Weedle as part of a poll of younger viewers on their favourite Pokémon.[19]

Kakuna[edit]

Number: 014 Type: Bug/Poison Evolves from: Weedle Evolves into: Beedrill

Kakuna, known as コクーン (Cocoon?) in Japan, is a pupal Pokémon that evolves from Weedle and evolves into the bee-like Pokémon Beedrill.

Beedrill[edit]

Number: 015 Type: Bug/Poison Evolves from: Kakuna Evolves into: None

Beedrill, known as スピアー (Spear?) in Japan, is a bee-like Pokémon that evolves from Kakuna. It has a poison barb spike on each of its arms and is very aggressive against Pokémon and people that approach its nest.[20][21] When angered, Beedrill attack in a furious swarm, and the sharp ends of their stingers and the poison stored in their abdomens will definitely be put to use.[22] In comparing Beedrill to Butterfree, Brett Elston argued that both were there to demonstrate evolution to new players, adding that Beedrill focuses more on dealing damage than Butterfree does. He notes that Beedrill, like Butterfree, will be replaced with more powerful Pokémon.[23] Boys' Life named Beedrill the third of five "coolest" Pokémon from Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen.[24]

Pidgey[edit]

Number: 016 Type: Normal/Flying Evolves from: None Evolves into: Pidgeotto

Pidgey, known as ポッポ (Poppo) in Japan, is a small bird Pokémon. It evolves into Pidgeotto, which then evolves into Pidgeot. Its main prey is Bug Pokémon. Loredana Lipperini, author of Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi, commented that while Pidgey's name was based on pigeon, it more closely resembled a sparrow.[16] GamesRadar editor Brett Elston attributed Pidgey's popularity to being commonly seen in the anime as well as being a solid Pokémon.[25] The Independent described Pidgey as a "cute-looking monster" and a "moderately angry pigeon."[26]

Pidgeotto[edit]

Number: 017 Type: Normal/Flying Evolves from: Pidgey Evolves into: Pidgeot

Pidgeotto, known as ピジョン (Pigeon?) in Japan, is a bird of prey Pokémon and the evolution to Pidgey. It is a larger and more powerful version of Pidgey. It will eventually evolve into its final form, Pidgeot. Pidgeotto appeared in the Pokémon anime as one of series star Ash Ketchum's first Pokémon. It eventually evolved into Pidgeot.

Pidgeot[edit]

Number: 018 Type: Normal/Flying Evolves from: Pidgeotto Evolves into: None

Pidgeot, known as ピジョット (Pigeot?) in Japan, is a bird of prey Pokémon and the final stage in the Pidgey evolutionary line. It evolves from Pidgeotto. It is larger than Pidgeotto, and has a large colourful crest on its head. It is a Loredana Lipperini, author of Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi, described it as a predator of beetles, much like real birds.[16]

Rattata[edit]

Number: 019 Type: Normal Evolves from: None Evolves into: Raticate

Rattata, known as コラッタ (Koratta) in Japan, is a purple rat Pokémon. It has large, sharp teeth, and it lives in large packs.[27] They are one of the first Pokémon players can encounter in Pokémon Red and Blue. GamesRadar editor Raymond Padilla criticized Rattata's design for being too similar to its inspiration and described it as a "filthy rodent."[28] Official Nintendo Magazine's Chris Scullion criticized how common Rattata was and described it as "rubbish."[29] IGN's "Pokémon Chick" wrote that anyone that has never seen a Rattata has never played a Pokémon game. She added that because of its underwhelming nature, it is typically not used.[30]

Raticate[edit]

Number: 020 Type: Normal Evolves from: Rattata Evolves into: None

Raticate, known as ラッタ (Ratta) in Japan, is a rat Pokémon that evolves from Rattata. It is larger and more aggressive than its earlier form. Female Raticate have shorter whiskers than their male counterparts.[31] It has brief appearances in the Pokémon anime and in the Pokémon Adventures manga, the character Yellow owns a Raticate.

Spearow[edit]

Number: 021 Type: Normal/Flying Evolves from: None Evolves into: Fearow

Spearow, known as オニスズメ (Onisuzume), are aggressive bird Pokémon whose English name comes from a combination of the words "spear" and "sparrow." They evolve into Fearow. A large flock of Spearow are featured in the first episode of the Pokémon anime; protagonist Ash Ketchum angers one, and the flock attacks him. Ash protects Pikachu from this flock, which causes Ash and Pikachu to become closer and Pikachu to defeat the flock. It appears again as a Fearow in a later episode, which again tries to attack Ash.

Fearow[edit]

Number: 022 Type: Normal/Flying Evolves from: Spearow Evolves into: None

Fearow, known as オニドリル (Onidrill?) in Japan, is a large aggressive bird which evolves from Spearow. In the Pokémon anime, a Fearow appears as the leader of a flock of Spearow which attacked protagonist Ash Ketchum in the very first episode of the show. GamesRadar editor Brett Elston noted that it was less popular than fellow Flying-type Pokémon Pidgeot.[32]

Ekans[edit]

Number: 023 Type: Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Arbok

Ekans, known as アーボ (Arbo?) in Japan, is a snake Pokémon that evolves into the cobra-like Arbok. It is a poisonous Pokémon and a predator. UGO Networks featured Ekans and Arbok as part of its "Snake Week" and expressed joy that Pokémon had "at least one snake". They called Ekans a "killer Pokemon" and "a chalky purple snake with a penchant for being defeated". They added that "as reward for sucking so consistently, Ekans was allowed to evolve into 'Arbok,' bigger, badder and more purple than ever" and that Arbok "didn't fare much better than his lower form on the battlefield, but he sure looked cute whenever one of the more heroic Pokemon zapped the crap out of him".[33] Author Loredana Lipperini described Ekans as “treacherous.”[34]

Arbok[edit]

Number: 024 Type: Poison Evolves from: Ekans Evolves into: None

Arbok (アーボック?) is a cobra-like Pokémon and a larger and stronger form of the Pokémon Ekans. It is purple with markings on its underbelly that resembles a face, which is used to intimidate its opponents.[35] It was a major Pokémon in the Pokémon anime, as it was owned by major antagonist Jessie. IGN's Pokémon Chick wrote that Arbok was a favorite among players who like Arbok for being an enemy toward Pikachu and Ash Ketchum in the Pokémon anime. She added that Arbok had "personality to spare and can add a splash of much-needed color and originality to any team." She also wrote that it is "one of the few pure Poison types that isn't a butt-ugly mass of undefined tissue" and referenced Muk and Weezing as examples.[36] She also called Arbok her "beloved".[37] She wrote that while she liked the Pokémon Seviper for being a snake, she will "always love Arbok just a little bit more simply because I was introduced and subsequently latched onto him first".[38] IGN's Pokémon of the Day Guy called it a "swell first Pokémon" and compared it to "Q-Bert's arch-nemesis".[39] UGO Networks featured Ekans and Arbok as part of its "Snake Week" and expressed joy that Pokémon had "at least one snake". They called Ekans a "killer Pokemon" and "a chalky purple snake with a penchant for being defeated". They added that "as reward for sucking so consistently, Ekans was allowed to evolve into 'Arbok,' bigger, badder and more purple than ever" and that Arbok "didn't fare much better than his lower form on the battlefield, but he sure looked cute whenever one of the more heroic Pokemon zapped the crap out of him".[33]

Pikachu[edit]

Number: 025 Type: Electric Evolves from: Pichu (Happiness) Evolves into: Raichu (Thunder stone)

Pikachu (ピカチュウ Pikachū?) are mouse-like Pokémon, and were the first "Electric-type" Pokémon created, their design intended to revolve around the concept of electricity.[40] It is the official mascot of the Pokémon franchise and is among the most well-known Pokémon.[citation needed] They appear as mouse-like creatures that have short, yellow fur with brown markings covering their backs and parts of their lightning bolt shaped tails. They have black-tipped, pointed ears and red circles on their cheeks, which can spark with electricity.[41] In Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, gender differences were introduced; a female Pikachu now has an indent at the end of its tail, giving it a heart-shaped appearance. They attack primarily by projecting electricity from their bodies at their targets. Within the context of the franchise, a Pikachu can transform, or "evolve" into a Raichu when exposed to a "Thunderstone". In later titles an evolutionary predecessor was introduced named "Pichu", which evolves into a Pikachu after establishing a close friendship with its trainer.

Raichu[edit]

Number: 026 Type: Electric Evolves from: Pikachu Evolves into: None

Raichu (ライチュウ Raichū?), known as the Electric Mouse Pokémon, is a taller form that Pikachu takes when a Thunder Stone is applied. Raichu is a rather small bipedal rodent. Like Pikachu, Raichu has long ears and feet, and stubby arms; both species also have two horizontal brown stripes on its back. Its long, thin tail has a broad, lightning bolt-shaped end, which is smaller and blunted on females. Raichu is orange in color, with a white belly. Its paws are brown, as well as its toes, while the soles of its feet are tan colored. Its bifurcated ears are brown on the outsides and yellow on the insides, and end in a distinctive curl at their bottom-most point. Unlike Pikachu, with its distinctive red circles, the cheek sacs of Raichu are yellow.

Sandshrew[edit]

Number: 027 Type: Ground Evolves from: None Evolves into: Sandslash

Sandshrew, known as サンド (Sand?) in Japan, are tough-skinned Pokémon that are able to burrow into the ground. It evolves into Sandslash.

Sandslash[edit]

Number: 028 Type: Ground Evolves from: Sandshrew Evolves into: None

Sandslash, known as サンドパン (Sandpan?) in Japan, are a larger and stronger form that Sandshrew eventually become. Like Sandshrew, they are tough-skinned and are capable of burrowing into the ground.

Nidoran♀[edit]

Number: 029 Type: Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Nidorina

Nidoran♀ (ニドラン♀ Nidoran Mesu?) is a species of poisonous mouse-like Pokémon. It is among the first species of Pokémon to have only one gender. It evolves into Nidorina and finally Nidoqueen. Its counterparts are Nidoran♂, Nidorino, and Nidoking.

Nidorina[edit]

Number: 030 Type: Poison Evolves from: Nidoran♀ Evolves into: Nidoqueen

Nidorina (ニドリーナ Nidorīna?) is a poisonous rodent that evolves from Nidoran♀. Along with Nidoran♀ and Nidoqueen, it is the only female Pokémon upon its introduction in the video games. The line's counterparts are Nidoran♂, Nidorino, and Nidoking.

Nidoqueen[edit]

Number: 031 Type: Poison/Ground Evolves from: Nidorina Evolves into: None

Nidoqueen (ニドクイン Nidokuin?) is a poisonous rodent Pokémon. Along with Nidoran♀ and Nidorina, it is the only female Pokémon upon its introduction in the video games. The line's counterparts are Nidoran♂, Nidorino, and Nidoking. It is less powerful than Nidoking, but more intelligent.[citation needed]

Nidoran♂[edit]

Number: 032 Type: Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Nidorino

Nidoran♂ (ニドラン♂ Nidoran Osu?) is a species of Pokémon. It evolves into Nidorino, and finally Nidoking. In the original Red and Blue versions, Nidoran♂ and its evolutions are the only male Pokémon in the series. Its line's counterpart are Nidoran♀, Nidorina, and Nidoqueen.

Nidorino[edit]

Number: 033 Type: Poison Evolves from: Nidoran♂ Evolves into: Nidoking

Nidorino (ニドリーノ Nidorīno?) is a species of Pokémon that evolves from Nidoran♂ and into Nidoking once an object called a Moon Stone is used on it. Like Nidoran♂ and Nidoking, it is the only male Pokémon in the Red and Blue versions. Its line's counterpart are Nidoran♀, Nidorina, and Nidoqueen.

Nidoking[edit]

Number: 034 Type: Poison/Ground Evolves from: Nidorino Evolves into: None

Nidoking (ニドキング Nidokingu?) is a species of Pokémon. It evolves from Nidorino with use of an object called a Moon Stone. Along with Nidorino and Nidoran♂, it is the only male Pokémon available in the Red and Blue versions. Its line's counterpart are Nidoran♀, Nidorina, and Nidoqueen. In a poll conducted by IGN, it was voted as the 42nd best Pokémon, where the staff commented on how Nidoking does not have a crown. They further stated that "Maybe in Generation VI he’ll finally get the adornments befitting a king".[42]

Clefairy[edit]

Number: 035 Type: Fairy Evolves from: Cleffa (Happiness) Evolves into: Clefable

Clefairy, known as ピッピ (Pippi), is a small, bipedal pink Pokémon. It was chosen to be the mascot of the Pokémon manga. However, Pikachu - the mascot of the anime - became the mascot of the whole series.[43] It evolves into Clefable using an object called a Moon Stone. It was given a pre-evolution called Cleffa in Pokémon Gold and Silver. All three were originally Normal type, but were changed to the new Fairy type in Pokémon X and Y. They have appeared in spin-offs such as Pokémon Stadium and multiple entries in the Super Smash Bros. series. Clefairy's first anime appearance was in Clefairy and the Moon Stone, in which Ash and his friends meet a group of Clefairy at Mt. Moon, where they pray to a moon stone.[44] IGN editor "Pokémon of the Day Chick" called Clefairy an "ever-popular Pokémon," though not as much as in the United States as it is in Japan. She added that she did an article for Clefairy solely because of her dislike for Clefable, though stating that it's "cool enough."[45] GamesRadar editor Carolyn Gudmundson compared Clefairy to Jigglypuff, stating that it is far less utilized, in spite of the fact that was initially supposed to be the mascot of the series. She also noted it as a part of an overused Pokémon design, the "huggable pink blob."[46]

Clefable[edit]

Number: 036 Type: Fairy Evolves from: Clefairy Evolves into: None

Clefable, known as ピクシー (Pixy?) in Japan, is a Fairy Pokémon that evolves from the Pokémon Clefairy by use of an object called a Moon Stone.

Vulpix[edit]

Number: 037 Type: Fire Evolves from: None Evolves into: Ninetales

Vulpix, known as ロコン (Rokon) in Japan, is a fox Pokémon with six curled tales. It is based on the Japanese fox spirit kitsune. known as Fox Pokémon, is a fox-like creature with six curled tails, based on the Japanese fox spirit kitsune. They are able to manipulate fire. They will evolve into Ninetales when an object called a Fire Stone is used.

Ninetales[edit]

Number: 038 Type: Fire Evolves from: Vulpix Evolves into: None

Ninetales, known as キュウコン (Kyukon?) in Japan, is a fox Pokémon although it looks like a wolf, is a golden-white fox based on the kitsune, a Japanese fox spirit.[47] The Kyūbi (九尾?), which held similar powers such as shapeshifting, were the main inspiration for the Pokémon. Ninetales' name was derived from the number of its tails, nine, and the fact that the idea for it came primarily from ancient Japanese tales.[47]

Jigglypuff[edit]

Number: 039 Type: Normal/Fairy Evolves from: Igglybuff (Happiness) Evolves into: Wigglytuff

Jigglypuff, known as プリン (Purin) in Japan, is a balloon-like Pokémon which evolves into the Pokémon Wigglytuff when exposed to an object called a Moon Stone. It is notable for its singing, which causes others to fall asleep; it is a recurring character in the anime. In these roles, Jigglypuff causes people and Pokémon to fall asleep when it sings, causing it to become angry and vandalize their faces with a marker when they do. It was given a pre-evolution in Pokémon Gold and Silver called Igglybuff. Game Freak's staff have noted Jigglypuff as both one of their and the public's favorite Pokémon, in terms of both anime and video game appearances.[48] Jigglypuff appears as a playable character in the Super Smash Bros. series starting with Super Smash Bros. for the Nintendo 64.

Wigglytuff[edit]

Number: 040 Type: Normal/Fairy Evolves from: Jigglypuff Evolves into: None

Wigglytuff, known as プクリン (Pukurin?) in Japan, is a balloon-like Pokémon which evolves from Jigglypuff through the use of an object called a Moon Stone. It grows long rabbit ears when it evolves. In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness, Wigglytuff is the guild master of the guild that the lead character is a member of. IGN's Pokémon of the Day Guy wrote that Wigglytuff was both "soft and cuddly".[49] IGN's Pokémon Chick called it a "perky pink Pokémon" and that while Jigglypuff's popularity was "mind-boggling", once it evolves into Wigglytuff, it "has a tendency to sort of slip into the background". She added that it was a "pity" because "this irritable, googly-eyed pastel mercenary is actually pretty cool".[50] Official Nintendo Magazine's Thomas East wrote that Wigglytuff's name was amusing and that it could have made his list of the five best Pokémon names.[51] Destructoid's Ashley Davis wrote that cute evolutions such as Wigglytuff do not become as useful as tougher looking ones.[52] Author Joseph Jay Tobin wrote that Wigglytuff was popular among young girls.[53] GamePro's Emily Balistrieri called the Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness incarnation of Wigglytuff a "weird, weird Pokémon".[54]

Zubat[edit]

Number: 041 Type: Poison/Flying Evolves from: None Evolves into: Golbat

Zubat (ズバット Zubatto?) is a bat-like Pokémon. It uses ultrasonic waves to find its way and is commonly found inside caves.[55] It evolves into the larger Golbat. Male Zubats have larger fangs than females. Since their appearance in the Pokémon series, Zubat has received generally mixed reception. IGN's Pokémon Chick called the Zubat line her favourite dual-type Pokémon line.[56] IGN's Jack DeVries, Kristine Steimer, and Nick Nolan criticized the abundance of Zubats and Geodude, bemoaning the lack of variety in caves; they added that because of the simple design of Zubat it is easily replaceable.[57] Many sources have compared Zubat to Woobat, and consider it a replacement.[58][59][60][61][62][63]

Golbat[edit]

Number: 042 Type: Poison/Flying Evolves from: Zubat Evolves into: Crobat (Happiness)

Golbat (ゴルバット Gorubatto?) is a bat-like Pokémon that resides in caves. It evolves from Zubat, and beginning with Pokémon Gold and Silver, it can evolve into the Pokémon Crobat once it becomes happy enough. It is larger than Zubat, and has a large gaping mouth. Like Zubat, it is commonly found in caves. Male Golbats have larger fangs than females. IGN's Pokémon Chick wrote that Golbat was "unforgivably ugly" in Red and Blue but has fans.[56] She later used it as an example of an ugly middle evolution.[64] Newsday's Eric Holm called it a popular character in Pokémon.[65] Destructoid's Jim Sterling called Golbat "absolutely ridiculous" and that it "barely even qualifies as a bat". He added that he never liked Zubat or Golbat "either from an aesthetic or a gameplay point of view".[66]

Oddish[edit]

Number: 043 Type: Grass/Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Gloom

Oddish, known as ナゾノクサ (Nazonokusa?) in Japan, is a weed-like Pokémon that looks like a small animated radish plant. It evolves into Gloom, and then Vileplume through use of a Leaf Stone.

Gloom[edit]

Number: 044 Type: Grass/Poison Evolves from: Oddish Evolves into: Vileplume/Bellossom (Sun Stone)

Gloom, known as クサイハナ (Kusaihana) in Japan, is a flower-like Pokémon that is a larger and stronger evolution of Oddish. It has a very distinct odour and is marked by fluids that drool from its mouth, used to attract prey. It evolves into Vileplume through use of a Leaf Stone. Beginning with Pokémon Gold and Silver, Gloom has become able to evolve into the Pokémon Bellossom using an object called a Sun Stone.

Vileplume[edit]

Number: 045 Type: Grass/Poison Evolves from: Gloom Evolves into: None

Vileplume, known as ラフレシア (Ruffresia?) in Japan, is a huge flower-like Pokémon that is a larger and stronger evolution of Gloom. Vileplumes can be obtained by using a Leaf Stone on a Gloom. Vileplume is known for its extremely offensive stench that comes from its large red flower. Vileplume have been featured in several forms of merchandise, including figures, plush toys, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game. Vileplume was featured as a keychain in a Burger King promotion.[67] A first edition Vileplume card has been noted as being worth up to $75.[68] A Vileplume card was released with a printing mistake.[69]

Paras[edit]

Number: 046 Type: Bug/Grass Evolves from: None Evolves into: Parasect

Paras (パラス Parasu?) is a basic parasite-like Pokémon that has two mushrooms on its back. It evolves into Parasect, which becomes controlled by the large mushroom on its back.

Parasect[edit]

Number: 047 Type: Bug/Grass Evolves from: Paras Evolves into: None

Parasect (パラセクト Parasekuto?) is a larger and stronger evolution of Paras that has one large mushroom on its back instead of two (see Paras). The mushroom has completely taken over the bug host. The Japanese and English names are a portmanteau of the English words "parasite" and "insect". It is deeply related to the mushroom on its back. Parasect is the mushroom's host so in-place the mushroom gives it spores which paralyze its enemy on contact.

Venonat[edit]

Number: 048 Type: Bug/Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Venomoth

Venonat, known as コンパン (Kongpang?) in Japan, is a poisonous insect Pokémon which evolves into the flying moth-like Pokémon. A Venonat is owned by Tracey Sketchit in the Pokémon anime. A theory exists that Butterfree and the Pokémon Venonat were once to be related; GamesRadar's Carolyn Gudmundson stated that their faces and hands were identical and looked more similar than Venonat does to its evolution Venomoth. She theorized that the developers may have mixed up the families due to Metapod being so similar to Venomoth. Another GamesRadar editor commented that Venomoth seemed diverged from Venonat.[70] GameDaily ranked Venonat third on their list of the "Top 10 Weirdest Looking Pokémon", stating "Pokémon should be cuddly. Pokémon should have faces with big cheery smiles. They should not resemble bugs with blood-red eyeballs that suggest they carry disease."[71] GamesRadar however praised the character, stating while its appearance would imply worthlessness, to the point that around their offices "Venonat fan" was an insult, its attacks showed otherwise and made it a versatile character.[72]

Venomoth[edit]

Number: 049 Type: Bug/Poison Evolves from: Venonat Evolves into: None

Venomoth, known as モルフォン (Morphon?) in Japan, is a large poisonous moth-like Pokémon which evolves from Venonat.

Diglett[edit]

Number: 050 Type: Ground Evolves from: None Evolves into: Dugtrio

Diglett, known as ディグダ (Digda?) in Japan, is a burrowing mole-like creature with a large pink nose. It is always seen with its body halfway in the ground. It evolves into Dugtrio, a Pokémon which consists of three Digletts put together. In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness, Diglett is one of the members of Wigglytuff Guild. His primary role is sentry duty, to examine visitors' footprints and say what Pokémon they are. In the anime, Diglett first appeared in "Dig Those Diglett", where they were troubling a construction crew of a dam in order to plant trees in the forest. It also appears in various Pokémon mangas. IGN's Pokémon Chick criticized Diglett's and Dugtrio's designs, questioning how cute something with a "humongous gauche clown nose" and a lack of a body could be.[73] Destructoid's Jim Sterling called Diglett the "pinnacle of lazy goddamn design", further questioning how much effort went into the character's design during development of the game.[74]

Dugtrio[edit]

Number: 051 Type: Ground Evolves from: Diglett Evolves into: None

Dugtrio (ダグトリオ Dugtrio?) is a burrowing mole-like Pokémon which is the evolution of Diglett. It consists of three Digletts that merged into one body. They think exactly like each other, and work cooperatively.[75] They trigger earthquakes when they travel underground.[76] In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness, Dugtrio is one of the members of the Wigglytuff Guild. He updates the Outlaw Notice Board and Job Bulletin Board with rotating boards. Dugtrio first appeared in the Pokémon anime in Dig Those Diglett. They worked with Diglett to plant trees in a forest. IGN's Pokémon Chick criticized Dugtrio's design, questioning how cute something with a "humongous gauche clown nose" and a lack of a body could be.[73]

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