Wikipedia:Picture of the day/February 2007

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These featured pictures previously appeared (or shall appear) as Picture of the day as scheduled below. You can add the automatically updating Picture of the day to your userpage or talk page using {{pic of the day}} (text version) or {{POTD}} (short version). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.


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February 1 - Thu

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A map of Network of National Highways in India, including NHDP projects up to phase IIIB, which is due to be completed by December 2012. The National Highways are the main long-distance roadways and constitute a total of about 58,000 km (36,250 mi), of which 4,885 km (3,053 mi) are central-separated expressways. Highways in India are around 2% of the total road network in India, but carry nearly 40% of the total road traffic.

Map credit: PlaneMad
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February 2 - Fri

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A male lion (Panthera leo) lying down in Namibia. One of the four "big cats" in the genus Panthera, the lion is the second largest cat, after the tiger. Males weigh between 150-250 kg (330-550 lb), and are easily recognizable by their manes. Though they were once found throughout much of Africa, Asia and Europe, lions presently exist in the wild only in Africa and India.

Photo credit: yaaaay
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February 3 - Sat

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A timed exposure of the first Space Shuttle mission, STS-1. The shuttle Columbia stands on launch pad A at Kennedy Space Center, the night before launch. The objectives of the maiden flight were to check out the overall Shuttle system, accomplish a safe ascent into orbit and to return to Earth for a safe landing.

Photo credit: NASA
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February 4 - Sun

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The Black-chinned Hummingbird (Archilochus alexandri, female shown here) is a small hummingbird found in open semi-arid areas near water in the western United States, northern Mexico and southern British Columbia. They are migratory and most winter in Mexico.

Photo credit: Mdf
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February 5 - Mon

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A burning match, a consumable artifact for producing fire under controlled circumstances on demand. A match is typically a wooden stick (usually sold in boxes) or stiff paper stick (usually sold in matchbooks) coated at one end with a material, the match head, often containing the element phosphorus, that will ignite from the heat of friction if struck against a suitable surface.

Photo credit: Sebastian Ritter
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February 6 - Tue

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Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Eleven (EODMU-11) members parachute from the ramp of a C-130 Hercules using a static line, a line connecting the deployment bag of the parachute to the aircraft from which the parachutist jumps. Static lines are used in order to make sure that a parachute is deployed immediately after leaving the plane.

Photo credit: Photographer's Mate Airman Chris Otsen, United States Navy
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February 7 - Wed

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A female American Wigeon (Anas americana), a common and widespread duck which breeds in northern North America. It is the New World counterpart of the Eurasian Wigeon. This dabbling duck is strongly migratory and winters further south than its breeding range.

Photo credit: Mdf
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February 8 - Thu

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Sunlight shines down upon the city of Sliven and the Upper Thracian Plain in Bulgaria. This area constitutes the northern part of the historical region of Thrace. A fertile agricultural region, the Upper Thracian Plain has an area of 6,032 km² and an average elevation of 168 m.

Photo credit: Evgeni Dinev
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February 9 - Fri

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A satellite image of the Sahara, the world's largest hot desert and second largest desert after Antarctica at over 9,000,000 km² (3,500,000 mi²), almost as large as the United States. The Sahara is located in Northern Africa and is 2.5 million years old.

Image credit: NASA
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February 10 - Sat

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On October 22, 1895, the GranvilleParis Express train overran the buffer stop at Gare Montparnasse station. The engine careened across almost 30 metres (100 feet) of the station concourse, crashed through a 60 centimetre thick wall, shot across a terrace and sailed out of the station, plummeting onto the Place de Rennes 10 metres (30 feet) below where it stood on its nose. While all of the passengers on board the train survived, one woman on the street below was killed by falling masonry.

Photo credit: Studio Lévy and Sons
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February 11 - Sun

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A macro shot of the head of a dragonfly, focusing on its compound eyes. Dragonfly eyes have up to 30,000 facets; each one is a separate light-sensing organ or ommatidium, arranged to give nearly a 360° field of vision.

Photo credit: Fir0002
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February 12 - Mon

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A twilight panorama of Regensburg, Bavaria, Germany with the 12th century bridge Steinerne Brücke and Regensburg Cathedral on the left and the river Danube in the foreground. Located at the confluence of the Danube and Regen rivers, the first settlements in the area date to the Stone Age. A Roman fort was constructed in 179. In contrast to almost all other major German cities, Regensburg had little damage from Allied air raids in World War II and thus has an almost intact medieval city center, which is listed as a UNESCO world heritage site.

Photo credit: Karsten Dörre
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February 13 - Tue

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The citrus root weevil (Diaprepes abbreviatus) is a major agricultural pest weevil in several Caribbean countries and the U.S. state of Florida. The larvae feed on the roots of the host plant for several months. They often eat the taproot of the plant, which can kill it by depriving it of water and nutrients or by making it vulnerable to infection by fungi, or water moulds.

Photo credit: Keith Weller, Agricultural Research Service
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February 14 - Wed

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Twin Lantana camara flowers, the most common species of the Lantana genus in cultivation, with a crab spider (Misumenoides formocipes) in ambush for prey. The genus contains about 150 species of perennial plants, native to tropical regions of the Americas and Africa. Some species are invasive, and are considered to be noxious weeds in southern Asia, southern Africa, and Australia.

Photo credit: Joaquim Alves Gaspar
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February 15 - Thu

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The marketplace of Göttingen, a city in Lower Saxony, Germany, with the old city hall, Gänseliesel fountain and pedestrian zone. Founded before 1200, the city is famous for Georg-August University, which was founded in 1737 and became the most visited university of Europe.

Photo credit: Daniel Schwen/Antilived
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February 16 - Fri

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A micrograph of a peacock mite (Tuckerella sp.) on a tea stem, taken by a low-temperature scanning electron microscope at 260X magnification. The peacock mites, an important pest on citrus in the tropics, are so named because of the elaborate ornamentations adorning the dorsal surface of their bodies. They possess five to seven pairs of whip-like setae which are used to defend themselves against predators. They may also help in wind-borne dispersal.

Image credit: Erbe and Pooley, Agricultural Research Service
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February 17 - Sat

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A panorama of Zabriskie Point, an area in Death Valley National Park, California, noted for its beautiful erosional landscape. It is called a badlands due to its difficult-to-traverse topography. The area is composed of sediment from Furnace Creek Lake, which dried-up 5 million years ago—long before Death Valley existed. It is named after Christian Brevoort Zabriskie, the vice-president and general manager of the Pacific Coast Borax Company in the early twentieth century.

Photo credit: Daniel Mayer/Andrew c
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February 18 - Sun

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Erg Chebbi, the sole Saharan erg in Morocco. An erg is a large, relatively flat area of desert covered with wind-swept sand with little to no vegetation cover. Approximately 85% of all the Earth's mobile sand is found in ergs that are larger than 32,000 km². Individual dunes in ergs typically have widths, lengths, or both dimensions greater than 500 m.

Ergs can be found where an atmosphere capable of significant wind erosion acts on the surface for a significant period of time, creating sand and allowing it to accumulate. Today at least three bodies, apart from Earth, are known in the solar system to feature ergs on their surface: Venus, Mars and Titan.

Photo credit: Rosa Cabecinhas and Alcino Cunha
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February 19 - Mon

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Picture 47 of the Ambrosian Iliad, a 5th century illuminated manuscript of Homer's Iliad, and one of only three illustrated manuscripts of classical literature to survive from antiquity. This miniature depicts Achilles sacrificing to Zeus.

Image credit: Unknown
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February 20 - Tue

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An F-15D Eagle from the 325th Fighter Wing based at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida releasing flares. The F-15 is a multi-role tactical fighter designed by McDonnell Douglas. The first flight of the F-15A was in July 1972, but since then it has been produced in six model variations with both single seat and dual seat versions. The original and largest operator of the F-15 is the United States Air Force, but it is also operated by the air forces of Israel, Japan, Saudi Arabia and South Korea.

Photo credit: SSgt Jeffrey Allen, United States Air Force
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February 21 - Wed

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A Cheshire Regiment sentry in a trench near La Boisselle during the Battle of the Somme. The battle is best remembered for its first day, 1 July 1916, on which the British Army suffered 57,470 casualties, including 19,240 dead. With more than one million casualties over five months, it was one of the bloodiest battles in human history. The Allied forces attempted to break through the German lines along a 25-mile (40 km) front north and south of the River Somme.

Photo credit: Lt. J. W. Brooke
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February 22 - Thu

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Three radomes at the Cryptologic Operations Center, Misawa Air Base, Japan. Short for "radar dome", a radome is a weatherproof enclosure used to protect an antenna. It is used mainly to prevent ice (especially freezing rain) from accumulating directly onto the metal surface of the antenna.

Photo credit: JO1 Preston Keres, United States Navy
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February 23 - Fri

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A House Sparrow, a "true sparrow" of the family Passeridae, as opposed to American sparrows. There are other birds, such as the Dunnock, also known as a Hedge Sparrow — a relic of the old practice of calling any small bird a "sparrow". There are 35 species of Old World sparrows, in four genera.

Photo credit: Fir0002
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February 24 - Sat

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The Hopi Chipmunk (Tamias rufus) is a chipmunk found in Colorado, Utah and New Mexico, in the Southwestern United States. Chipmunks are small squirrel-like rodents, native to North America except for one species in northeastern Asia. Though they are commonly depicted with their paws up to the mouth, eating peanuts, or with their cheeks bulging out on either side, chipmunks are actually omnivorous.

Photo credit: Mdf
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February 25 - Sun

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Ferrofluid on glass, with a rare-earth magnet underneath. A ferrofluid is a liquid that becomes strongly polarised in the presence of a magnetic field. Ferrofluids are composed of nanoscale ferromagnetic particles suspended in a carrier fluid, usually an organic solvent or water. Ferrofluids do not actually display ferromagnetism, since they do not retain magnetisation in the absence of an externally-applied field.

Photo credit: Greg Maxwell/Moondigger
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February 26 - Mon

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A whole and a cut lemon. Lemons are used primarily for their juice, though the pulp and rind (zest) are also used, primarily in cooking or mixing. Lemon juice is about 5% citric acid, which gives lemons a sour taste and a pH of 2 to 3. This acidity makes lemon juice a cheap, readily available acid for use in educational chemistry experiments.

Photo credit: André Karwath
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February 27 - Tue

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A composing stick and movable type, the system of printing and typography using pieces of metal type, made by casting from matrices struck by letterpunches. The text on the stick reads, "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog and feels as if he were in the seventh heaven of typography together with Hermann Zapf, the most famous artist of the" [sic].

Photo credit: Willi Heidelbach
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February 28 - Wed

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The first of a magnification series of a snow crystal (view the entire series) using a low temperature scanning electron microscope with magnification up to 100,000X, compared to 30X – 500X available with light microscopes. Snow samples are very fragile and exposure to the light necessary to photograph them, using light microscopes, can damage the crystals and even melt them. A low temperature SEM operating at −170°C avoids disturbing the structure.

Photo credit: Agricultural Research Service
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