Wikipedia:Picture of the day/November 2004

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A monthly archive of Wikipedia's featured pictures


These featured pictures previously appeared (or shall appear) as Picture of the day as scheduled below. You can add the automatically updating Picture of the day to your userpage or talk page using {{pic of the day}} (text version) or {{POTD}} (short version). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.


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November 1[edit]

Picture of the day

Orion Nebula

The Orion Nebula is a glowing nebula with a greenish hue and is situated below Orion's Belt. It is possibly the brightest diffuse nebula visible to the naked eye in the night sky. M42 is located at a distance of about 1,600 light years from the planet Earth, is 33 light years across, and can be seen clearly through even low-power binoculars, particularly from dark sky locations. Observations with powerful telescopes (especially the Hubble Space Telescope) have found stars enclosed in dust rings, probably the first phase of a planetary system formation.

Photo credit: NASA
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November 2[edit]

Picture of the day

SEM Pollen An image of Pollen taken by a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), a type of electron microscope capable of producing high resolution images of a sample surface. Due to the manner in which the image is created, SEM images have a characteristic 3-dimensional quality and are useful for judging the surface structure of the sample.

Photo credit: Rippel Electron Microscope Facility
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November 3[edit]

Picture of the day

Bald Eagle The Bald Eagle is a raptor that is indigenous to North America, and is the national symbol of the United States of America. The species was on the brink of extinction late in the 20th century but has largely recovered and now has a stable population. Its diet is varied, including fish, smaller birds, rodents, and sometimes food scavenged or stolen from campsites and picnics.

Photo credit: Adrian Pingstone
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November 4[edit]

Picture of the day

American White Ibis The American White Ibis is a species of wading bird of the ibis family, indigenous to the southern USA and the Caribbean. It lives in marshy wetlands, and on beaches, and has become common in city parks. They build a stick nest in a tree or bush over water, and 2-5 eggs are laid. This ibis feeds on various fish, frogs and other water creatures, and also insects. Adults are 65 cm long with a 95 cm wingspan. They are all-white except for black wing-tips and red bills and legs. Juveniles are largely brown with duller bare parts..

Photo credit: Jaap Folmer
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November 5[edit]

Picture of the day

Shadow Puzzle
Square A is exactly the same shade of grey as square B.
An optical illusion is any illusion that deceives the human visual system into perceiving something that is not present or incorrectly perceiving what is present. There are physiological illusions and cognitive illusions. A mirage is an example of a natural illusion that is an optical phenomenon, another example is the variation in the apparent size of the Moon (smaller when overhead, larger when near the horizon), this is not an optical phenomenon, but rather a cognitive or perceptual illusion.

Photo credit: Edward H. Adelson
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November 6[edit]

Picture of the day

Very Large Array The Very Large Array is a radio astronomy observatory consisting of 27 independent radio antennae, each of which has a dish diameter of 25 meters and weighs 230 tons. There are four commonly used configurations, designated A (the largest) through D (the tightest, when all the dishes are within 600 m of the center point). The observatory normally cycles through all the various possible configurations (including several hybrids) every 16 months.

Photo credit: Hajor
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November 7[edit]

Picture of the day

Aerial view of the village of Passchendaele The Battle of Passchendaele, otherwise known as the Third Battle of Ypres, was one of the major battles of World War I, fought by British, ANZAC and Canadian soldiers against the German army near Ypres (Ieper in Flemish) in West Flanders, northwestern Belgium over the control of the village of Passchendaele. As the village is now known as Passendale, the term Passchendaele alone is now used to refer to this battle. The label "Passchendaele" should properly apply only to the battle's later actions in October–November 1917, but has come to be applied also to the entire campaign from July 31. After three months of fierce fighting, the Canadian Corps took Passchendaele on November 6 1917, ending the battle. Passendale today forms part of the community of Zonnebeke, Belgium.

Photo credit: Imperial War Museum
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November 8[edit]

Picture of the day

Iron colored water

Water colored red by Iron. Iron comprises 95 percent of all the metal tonnage produced worldwide. Its combination of low cost and high strength make it indispensable, especially in applications like automobiles, the hulls of large ships, and structural components for buildings. The first signs of use of iron come from the Sumerians and the Egyptians, where around 4000 BC, small items were being fashioned from iron recovered from meteorites.

Photo credit: NASA
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November 9[edit]

Picture of the day

Pillar coral Pillar corals are a type of hard coral which live in the western Atlantic Ocean. They are one of the digitate corals which resemble fingers, or a cluster of cigars growing up from the sea floor, but without any secondary branching. Pillar corals can grow to be up to 2.5 m (8 ft) tall. They can grow on both flat and sloping sea floors at a depth of between 1 and 20 m (65 ft). They are one of the few types of hard coral whose polyps can commonly be seen feeding during the day.

Photo credit: NOAA
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November 10[edit]

Picture of the day

Pollen

Pollen, like on this Gerbera, is a fine powder consisting of pollen grains, which carry the male gametes of seed plants. The transfer of pollen grains to the female reproductive structure can be mediated by the wind, in which case the plant is described as wind-loving, these plants typically produce great quantities of very lightweight pollen grains. Insect-loving plants produce pollen that is relatively heavy and sticky, for dispersal by insect pollinators attracted to their flowers.

Photo credit: pdphoto.org
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November 11[edit]

Picture of the day

London Millennium Bridge

The London Millennium Footbridge opened on June 10, 2000. Unexpected lateral vibration required the bridge to be closed on June 12 for modifications. The movements were produced by the sheer numbers of pedestrians (90,000 people on the first day, with up to 2,000 on the bridge at any one time). The initial small vibrations encouraged the users to walk in synchronisation with the sway, increasing the effect. This swaying motion earned it the nickname the Wobbly Bridge.

Photo credit: Paul Lomax
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November 12[edit]

Picture of the day

Earth

"The Blue Marble" is a famous photograph of Earth. NASA officially credits the image to the entire Apollo 17 crew — Eugene Cernan, Ronald Evans and Jack Schmitt — all of whom took photographic images during the mission. Apollo 17 passed over Africa during daylight hours and Antarctica is also illuminated. The photograph was taken approximately five hours after the spacecraft's launch, while en route to the Moon. Apollo 17, notably, was the last manned lunar mission; no humans since have been at a range where taking a "whole-Earth" photograph such as "The Blue Marble" would be possible.

Photo credit: The Apollo 17 crew
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November 13[edit]

Picture of the day

Bonsai

The art of bonsai originated from China over two thousand years ago, where it has been called penzai, it spread to Korea during the Tang or Song Dynasty (the 7th13th century). As the Chinese art is intended for outdoor display the plants tend to be some what larger than seen in Japanese bonsai. A bonsai is not a genetically dwarfed plant; it is kept small by shaping and root pruning.

Photo credit: USDA-ARS
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November 14[edit]

Picture of the day

Eagle Nebula

The Eagle Nebula (also known as Messier Object 16, M16 or NGC 6611) is a young open cluster of stars in the Serpens Cauda constellation, one of the 88 modern constellations.

Other notable deep-sky objects in Serpent:

  • M5, a globular cluster approximately 8° southwest of α Serpentis in Caput, is among the most beautiful in the sky.
  • Part of the Milky Way passes through Serpens Cauda, as illustrated by the shaded regions of the star map.

Photo credit: NASA
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November 15[edit]

Picture of the day

Barrel Organ

A barrel organ is a mechanical musical instrument made of a series of pipes, and bellows, like any other traditional organ, and of a cylinder studded with staples or bridges or pins corresponding in their placement to a particular tune. The continuous rotation of the barrel causes the staples to come into contact with levers and rods which open valves to let air from the bellows into the organ pipes. The bellows is usually actuated by the same power source which, through reduction gearing or worm gearing, causes the drum to slowly turn around..

Photo credit: Chepry
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November 16[edit]

Picture of the day

Tugra Mahmuds II.gif

The Tughra (طغراء) of Mahmud II. A tughra is a Turkish paisley-like calligraphic seal or signature used at the beginning of sultans' decrees. These colorful emblems incorporated the ruler's name and title in intricate vegetal inscriptions designed by neshanis, or court calligraphers. Parallel to the European signet, tughras often appeared on coins and stamps of the Ottoman Empire.

Photo credit: Baba66
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November 17[edit]

Picture of the day

1958 Chevrolet Corvette

Taking its name from a small, maneuverable fighting frigate, the first Chevrolet Corvettes were virtually handbuilt in Flint, Michigan. The outer body was made out of a revolutionary new composite material called fiberglass, offering the strength of steel without the weight. The tradition continues even today, as no Corvette has ever had anything other than a fiberglass outer skin..

Photo credit: Softeis
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November 18[edit]

Picture of the day

Horse and Plough

The plough is a development of the pick, and was initially pulled by oxen or humans, and later horses. Modern ploughs are, in industrialized countries, powered by tractors. Ploughing has several beneficial effects. The major reason for ploughing is to incorporate the residue from the previous crop into the soil. Ploughing also reduces the prevalence of weeds in the fields, and makes the soil more porous, easing later planting..

Photo credit: Marcela
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November 19[edit]

Picture of the day

Marginated Tortoise

The natural range of the Marginated Tortoise is southern Greece, from the Peloponnesus to Mount Olympus. They are also found in isolated zones of the Balkans and Italy, with a somewhat broader range in northeastern Sardinia. The primary food for these tortoises are plants from their native Mediterranean region. Early in the morning, they leave their nightly shelter and bask in the sun to raise their body temperature. Then they go in search of food. In captivity, the primary foodstuffs are dandelions, clover and various varieties of lettuce..

Photo credit: Richard Mayer
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November 20[edit]

Picture of the day

Mark 48 Torpedo testing

The Mark 48 torpedo, carried by all U.S. Navy submarines, is designed to combat fast, deep-diving nuclear-powered submarines and high performance surface ships. In this test, an Australian submarine fired a Mark-48 war-shot torpedo at the 28 year old former Destroyer Escort Torrens. The torpedo detonated underneath the hull as designed and broke the destroyer in two.

Photo credit: United States Navy
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November 21[edit]

Picture of the day

Meadow Argus Butterfly

Unlike many insects, butterflies do not experience a nymph period, but instead go through four stages: Egg, Larva, Pupa and Imago. The adult butterflies have four wings, but unlike moths, the fore and hindwings are not hooked together, permitting a more graceful flight. Some butterflies have evolved 'eye' like markings on their wings, scaring off some birds, or allowing the butterfly a chance of escaping in the confusion when the bird simply pokes a hole in one of the wings.

Photo credit: Fir0002
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November 22[edit]

Picture of the day

Sake barrels

Sake is a Japanese alcoholic beverage, brewed from rice. In Japan, the word simply means alcoholic beverage. As with other alcohol in Japan, sake is poured with the palm of the hand facing down and the back of the hand facing up, particularly when it is poured for another person. Pouring with the palm of the hand facing up is considered rude and is likely to elicit surprise and disapproval.

Photo credit: Rdsmith4
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November 23[edit]

Picture of the day

Robert Hooke's drawing of a flea

Photo credit: Robert Hooke
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November 24[edit]

Picture of the day

Cockroach

Cockroaches are often found around garbage and in the kitchen. Female cockroaches, or henroaches, are sometimes seen carrying egg cases on the end of their abdomen. The eggs hatch from the combined pressure of the hatchlings swallowing air and are initially bright white nymphs that continue inflating themselves with air and harden and darken within about 4 hours. Their transient white stage while hatching and later while molting has led to many individuals claiming to have seen albino cockroaches.

The world's largest cockroach is the Australian giant burrowing cockroach, which can grow to 90 mm in length and weigh more than 30 grams.

Photo credit: Joăo Estęvăo A. de Freitas
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November 25[edit]

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Air Force One over Mt. Rushmore

The planes that serve as Air Force One can be operated as a military command center in the event of an incident such as a nuclear attack. Operational modifications include aerial refueling capability, electronic countermeasures (ECMs) which jam enemy radar, and flares to avoid heat-seeking missiles. The heavily shielded electronics onboard include around twice the amount of wiring found in a regular 747.

Photo credit: United States Air Force
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November 26[edit]

Picture of the day

Baseball pitching motion

A skilled baseball pitcher often throws a variety of different pitches in order to prevent the batter from hitting the ball well. The most basic pitch is a fastball, where the pitcher throws the ball as hard as he can. Some pitchers are able to throw a fastball at a velocity of over 100 miles per hour (160 km/h). Other common types of pitches are the curveball, slider, changeup, forkball, and knuckleball. These generally are intended to have unusual movement or deceive the batter as to the rotation or velocity of the ball, making it more difficult to hit.

Photo credit: Rick Dikeman
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November 27[edit]

Picture of the day

Hazelnuts

The Common Hazel is a shrub native to Europe and Asia. Its flowers are produced very early in spring before the leaves, and are monoecious. The seed is a nut, known as a hazelnut or cobnut. The nut falls out of the husk when ripe, about 7-8 months after pollination. The kernel of the seed is edible and used raw or roasted, or ground into a paste.

Photo credit: Fir0002
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November 28[edit]

Picture of the day

Buddhabrot

The Buddhabrot is a special rendering of the Mandelbrot set, which resembles to some extent certain depictions of the Buddha. Mathematically, the set consists of the set of points c in the complex number plane for which the iteratively defined sequence

z_{n+1} = {z_n}^2 + c

with z0 = 0 does not tend to infinity.

Photo credit: Evercat
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November 29[edit]

Picture of the day

Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster occupies a site of approximately 3.24 hectares (8 acres) on the west bank of the Thames, it has approximately 1,000 rooms, 100 staircases, and two miles of passageways. The 320ft high slim Clock Tower is undoubtedly the most famous feature, and houses the bell known as Big Ben, from which the Clock Tower is colloquially, but inaccurately named.

Photo credit: Andrew Dunn
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November 30[edit]

Picture of the day

Yellow rose

Roses are one of the most popular garden shrubs, and are also among the most common flowers sold by florists. The hips are sometimes eaten, mainly for their vitamin C content. They are usually pressed and filtered to make rose hip syrup, as the fine hairs surrounding the seeds are unpleasant to eat (resembling itching powder).

Photo credit: Fir0002
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