Wikipedia:What is and is not routine coverage

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Editors and contributors to Wikipedia may have difficulty determining what is and is not routine coverage of people and or events.

The guideline WP:ROUTINE is widely considered to be a very good guideline. Routine coverages such as weddings, funerals, sports scores, and other "and finally..." stories can be used to add to a notable article some interesting and details about a subject. That does not necessarily mean that such articles are good sources for establishing notability of a subject in the first place.

Conversly, there are many articles of notable events. Coverage in the media may be "routine" to the media (such as routine coverage of the Super Bowl or Winter Olympics) but that does not disqualify the event from being notable.

Editors should be careful in defining what is referred to as "routine" coverage, especially when determining notability.

Examples[edit]

Sports[edit]

In the world of sports, it is true that many sporting events are routinely covered, but that does not make all coverage of a sporting event "routine" at all. Modern-day sporting events can appear regularly in blogs or in local news as sports scores (sometimes called "box scores") without details. Such box scores are examples of routine coverage. If an article goes into detail about the event, that is not necessarily "routine" coverage. Not every sporting event earns a feature article in the press.

Politics[edit]

Once every four years, the United States holds an election for President. These elections are "routinely" covered by every news outlet and the event is a "pre-planned event" as a part of the United States Constitution. However, that does not mean that this coverage would be excluded from notability discussions because of the WP:ROUTINE guideline.

Conclusion[edit]

Be careful not to make WP:ROUTINE mean something that it does not. Just because a news article is written about a pre-planned event does not make it "routine" coverage.

See also[edit]