Wikipedia:Why Santa Is Important

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Why Telling the Truth About Santa is Important

I recently expanded the Santa Claus article with a well-sourced, international criticism section. I was one of the main editors who argued for telling the truth about Santa’s mythical nature, and per the lead guideline, I also outlined the major controversies. These actions made me unpopular with a few editors. But it is important to the project to not support people who want to hide Santa’s mythical nature, or try to make it appear he is real (originally editors were proposing a Santa Claus page for kids saying he is real).

  1. Wikipedia is not censored, including for children. This policy allows for the free exchange of information, and for truth to be presented.
  2. We must always present the truth as best we can. Although “truth” is a tricky concept, it is not when it comes to Santa Claus. Besides the fact that the myth is traceable, and every adult is told at some point that it has always been their parents who have purchased the gifts found under the tree. All known laws of physics make it impossible; elves don’t exist, etc.
  3. It’s a Christian tradition, and Wikipedia can’t support or prop up any religion’s traditions and myths, be it Judaism, Islam, Shinto, Animalism, or anything else. By sticking to our core policies, it keeps our noses clean and our site out of trouble.
  4. It hurts our credibility to do anything but tell the unadulterated, unabashed truth as best we can. Many of us have spent countless hours and a good deal of money on this “hobby” to build an encyclopedia people trust enough to use. Anything that hurts the work we have put into it--such as supporting a falsehood--hurts the work we all have put into the project.
  5. Wikipedia should never knowingly represent falsehoods as truthful.
  6. Some people believe the Earth is flat, or that it is only 6,000 years ago. Some people feel that God created the Earth in only 7 days. These people are adults, and take this as literal truth. The overwhelming scientific evidence contradicts them, and there is no evidence except for belief that these things are true. Those people are welcome to edit on Wikipedia, but if they want these “beliefs” featured prominently in the Earth article, they should joins their brothers at Conservapedia, where belief is all it takes.
  7. Some people also believe we have never been to the moon. Some people also believe Hillary Clinton murdered Vince Foster. Some people believe the Holocaust never happened (and even offer “proof”).
  8. To not tell the truth about Santa violates two core policies: WP:V and WP:NPOV. To not discuss the controversies over Santa Claus violates WP:LEAD. The article once was a GA; it is now closing to getting back there.
  9. If you are going to edit on Wikipedia, you should form principles and you should stick to them. I find many of the people who were “Supporting Santa” to be unprincipled in their “defense” of this fiction, no matter their reasoning. I think many of those same people would have problems if the items in No. 6 and No. 7 were ever being represented as factual on Wikipedia. When you don’t apply principles evenly, you hurt your credibility. And you hurt Wikipedia. No matter the season.

Happy Holidays.