Wikipedia:WikiProject Numismatics/Style/Currency article

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This style guides provides guidelines section by section, in verbose details.

Infobox[edit]

Include {{Infobox Currency}}. For more detail, see the instruction.

Overview[edit]

The MainUnit was the currency of place from startYear to endYear. It was subdivided into x subunits....

Etymology[edit]

Won (pronounced like the past tense of the English verb (to) win) is a cognate of the Chinese yuan and Japanese yen. The won was subdivided into 100 jeon (전; 錢; McCune-Reischauer: chŏn; Revised Romanization: jeon)...

This coin was popular among American colonists, who called it the Spanish dollar, the name having derived from a German coin of similar size and composition known as the thaler.

History[edit]

history...

Most recent/Current status[edit]

It's pegged to so-and-so currency...
It seems that very few articles have information about M1, M2, or any money supply information. Currency articles aren't just for collectors, but the people who are interested in economics too.

Coins[edit]

Introductory/explanatory text above the specification table.

Specification table[edit]

  • Column #1: Images.
  • Column #1a: Image of the obverse of the coin. Black background images are preferred. Scale images at 2.5 pixels per millimeter. If the width is unknown, fall back to 60 pixels per side. Use black background in the cell - however, if the image itself has a background that is neither transparent or black (e.g. the images of Ukrainian hryvnia), use the background that agrees with the background in the image.
  • Column #1b: Image of the reverse of the coin. Same rules as the obverse.
  • Column #1c (if important): Image of the edge of the coin. Same rules as the obverse, except the resolution at TBD pixels per millimeter.
  • Column #2: Value of the coin. Use symbol if possible. This should be linked to the separate article dedicated to the coin type (if such exists).
  • Column #3: Technical parameters.
  • Column #4: Description.
  • Column #4a: Description of the edge of the coin. In general, it can be smooth (plain), milled (serrated) or incused (ornaments or insriptions). In the latter case, describe the type of ornament or cite the inscription.
  • Column #4b: Description of the obverse of the coin. Omit words like "portrait of", "famous writer ...", or the date of birth/death. Such information is best left to its own article. If such article does not exist, this rule can be relaxed.
  • Column #4c: Description of the reverse of the coin. Same rule as the obverse.
  • Column #5: Important dates.
  • Column #5a: Date of minting. In general, this is the year indicated on the coin.
  • Column #5b: Date of issue. This is the date when the coin was released into circulation by law (since when acceptance is obligatory in public cash flow).
  • Column #5c: Date of withdrawal. This is the date when the coin was withdrawn from circulation by law, acceptance is no longer obligatory in public cash flow. However, in most cases withdrawn coins still can be exchanged to current money in banks.
  • Column #5d: Date of lapse. After this date neither commercial banks nor the central bank is obligated to exchange the withdrawn coin to current.
In general, do not include withdrawal or lapse date if current. And do not split into upper and lower halves if there is only 1 column in this column group. See New Taiwan dollar for example.
  • Additional columns
  • Others
  • Each row should represent a coin type. Subtypes should be described in the separate article dedicated to the main coin type. To decide whether a coin is a type or a subtype, world coin catalogs are good references.
  • Use color template {{Coin-copper-color}}, {{Coin-silver-color}}, and {{Coin-yellow-color}} to fill the row (except for the image cells) corresponding to the composition of the coin.
  • Sort for good overview.
  • Sort coins into series - common design, year of first minting or coin catalogs can help.
  • Sort series into regular, circulating commemorative and non-circulating commemorative issues.
  • A regular issue is typically minted in more than one years in large quantities and it primarily serves as payment medium.
  • A circulating commemorative issue is typically minted in one year (generally on an anniversary) in large quantities and also serves as payment medium. These coins might have a design more or less similar to the regular issues.
  • A (non-circulating) commemorative issue is typically minted in one year (generally on an anniversary) in small and limited quantity and not released into circulation but sold to collectors (usually for higher price than its nominal value - however, they are legal tender at their nominal value). These coins usually bear a special design - distinctive from the regular issues. High nominal value and using precious metal is also common.
  • Sort coins of the same regular issue into ascending order of their nominal value. Coins of the same value should be sorted into ascending order of their first minted year.
Prewar series - Regular issues (link to official page about this series if exists)
Image Value Technical parameters Description Date of
Obverse Reverse Diameter Thickness Mass Composition Edge Obverse Reverse first minting issue withdrawal
HUPf 1 1938 obverse.jpg HUPf 1 1938 reverse.jpg 1 f 17.0 mm 1.0 mm 1.66 g Bronze
95% copper
4% tin
1% zinc
Smooth "MAGYAR KIRÁLYSÁG", Holy Crown of Hungary, year of minting Indication of value, mintmark 1926 27 December 1926 31 December 1945
HUPf 20 1941 obverse.jpg HUPf 20 1941 reverse.jpg 20 f 21.0 mm
hole: 5.0 mm
1.7 mm 3.6 g Steel Smooth "MAGYAR KIRÁLYSÁG", Holy Crown of Hungary, year of minting Indication of value, mintmark 1941 11 November 1941 31 December 1945
Prewar series - Circulating commemorative issues
HUP 2Pazmany 1935 obverse.jpg HUP 2Pazmany 1935 reverse.jpg 2 P 27.0 mm 2.1 mm 10.0 g 640‰ silver Incused "MAGYAR KIRÁLYSÁG", coat of arms, indication of value, year of minting, mintmark "A 300 ÉVES KIR PÁZMÁNY PÉTER TUD EGYETEM ALAPÍTÁSÁNAK EMLÉKÉRE"[1], Péter Pázmány with two students 1935 25 September 1935 31 January 1942
These images are to scale at 2.5 pixels per millimetre. For table standards, see the coin specification table.

Banknotes[edit]

Introductory/explanatory text above the specification table.

Specification table[edit]

  • Column #1: Images.
  • Column #1a: Image of the obverse of the bill. Scale images at 0.7 pixels per millimeter. If the width is unknown, fall back to 100 pixels per side. Use black background in the cell.
  • Column #1b: Image of the reverse of the bill. Same rules as the obverse.
  • Column #2: Value of the bill. Use symbol if possible. This should be linked to the separate article dedicated to the bill type (if such exists).
  • Column #3: Main colour. Use a few words or "multicolour" if complex. Use spelling of "colour" or "color" preferred by the users of this currency. See Wikipedia:Manual of Style (spelling).
  • Column #4: Dimensions. Length (horizontal) × width (vertical) in millimeters. Beware, the multiplication sign is ×, not x (the letter between w and y).
Q: Why not just the letter x?
A: Because it's not really the multiplication sign. And even though × and x look similar under most default browser setting, it's not always the case.
Q: How do I type "×"?
A: It's in the toolbox below when you edit, first line.
Q: What about wiki in other languages, or when they take it away from the toolbox?
A: There are numerous ways to enter it, although not with 1 key stroke.
  1. Copy and paste from here
  2. Click on it below the edit window
  3. If using Microsoft Windows, press and hold down the left Alt key, press 0 2 1 5 on the numeric keypad, release the Alt key.
  4. Open Microsoft Word, if you have it, type D7 and then press alt-x.
  5. Use "×" "×", or "×"
  • Column #5: Description.
  • Column #5a: Description of the obverse of the bill.
  • Column #5b: Description of the reverse of the bill.
  • Column #5c: Description of the watermark.
  • Column #6: Important dates.
  • Column #6a: Date of printing. In general, this is the date indicated on the bill.
  • Column #6b: Date of issue. This is the date when the bill was released into circulation by law (since when acceptance is obligatory in public cash flow).
  • Column #6c: Date of withdrawal. This is the date when the bill was withdrawn from circulation by law, acceptance is no longer obligatory in public cash flow. However, in most cases withdrawn bills still can be exchanged to current in banks.
  • Column #6d: Date of lapse. After this date neither commercial banks nor the central bank is obligated to exchange the withdrawn bill to current.
As with coins, in general, do not include withdrawal or lapse date if current. And do not split into upper and lower halves if there is only 1 column in this column group. See South Korean won for example.
  • Watermark: Use "As portrait" when applicable.
  • Additional columns: e.g. Language used, calendar used.
  • At the end of the table use {{Standard banknote table notice}} with appropriate parameters.
1936-1941 series (link to official page about this series if exists)
Image Value Dimensions Main Colour Description Date of Remark
Obverse Reverse Obverse Reverse Watermark printing issue withdrawal
HUP 2 1940 obverse.jpg HUP 2 1940 reverse.jpg 2 pengő 114 × 58 mm Green Female model Mother with her child Jane Doe 15 July 1940 20 January 1941 10 March 1942 Trivia
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre.

Historical exchange rates[edit]

Use Wikitable

{|class="wikitable"
!-
! title row, column 1 !! title row, column 2 ...
|-
| regular row 1, c 1 || regular R1 C2 ...
|-
| regular R2 C1 || regular R2 C2 ...
...
|}


Exchange rate[edit]

Use {{Exchange Rate}} (for circulating currencies)

See instruction

Trivia/other info[edit]

  • It is considered rude to put baht banknotes in a wallet that sits in the back pocket, as this allows someone to sit on the image of the King, which is considered highly disrespectful. Similarly, stepping on a baht banknote (or coin) is considered disrespectful.

See also[edit]

  • related/sibling currency (if any and when appropriate) (i.e. a currency that share the same successor, or the same predecesor)

(e.g. CFA franc and CFP franc)

  • Do NOT include articles of the issuing authority/central bank if already in infobox
  • Economy of xyz

References[edit]

  • banknote/coin catalog

use template {{cite book}}, which looks like

{{cite book | title=Standard Catalog of World Paper Money: General Issues to 1960
|edition=8th ed. | author=Albert Pick
|editor=Neil Shafer, George S. Cuhaj, Colin R. Bruce II (editors)
|publisher=Krause Publications | year=1996 | id=ISBN 0873414691 }}

and results into
Albert Pick (1996). Neil Shafer, George S. Cuhaj, Colin R. Bruce II (editors), ed. Standard Catalog of World Paper Money: General Issues to 1960 (8th ed. ed.). Krause Publications. ISBN 0873414691. 

External links[edit]

  • Use {{Standard numismatics external links}}
  • Do NOT include issuing authority/central bank if already in infobox
    • Otherwise, put issuing authority/central bank (bold the official entity)
  • Same rule for mint and printer
  • fan site
(new succession box like)
Preceded by:
Sarawak dollar (post-WWII)
Reason: creation of a common Board of Commissioners of Currency
Ratio: at par, or 60 dollars = 7 British pounds
Currency of Sarawak
19531963
Currency of Malaysia
19631967
Note: formation of the Federation
Succeeded by:
Malaysian dollar
Location: Malaysia
Ratio: at par, or 60 dollars = 7 British pounds
Preceded by:
British North Borneo dollar (post-WWII)
Reason: creation of a common Board of Commissioners of Currency
Ratio: at par, or 60 dollars = 7 British pounds
Currency of British North Borneo
19531963
Preceded by:
Malayan dollar (post-WWII)
Reason: creation of a common Board of Commissioners of Currency
Ratio: at par, or 60 dollars = 7 British pounds
Currency of Malaya
19531963
Currency of Singapore
19531963
Succeeded by:
Singapore dollar
Location: Singapore
Reason: Independence
Ratio: at par, or 60 dollars = 7 British pounds
Currency of Brunei
19531967
Succeeded by:
Brunei dollar
Reason: Currency Agreement
Ratio: at par, or 60 dollars = 7 British pounds

{{Money-stub}} (where applicable)
{{Malaysia-stub}} (country stub where applicable)


[[Category:Currencies of Some Continent]]
[[Category:Economic of Some Country/Place]] (if not exist, use Category:Some Country/Place)
[[Category:Modern obsolete currencies]] (where applicable)
[[Category:Medieval currencies]] (where applicable)
[[Category:Ancient currencies]] (where applicable)
[[Category:Monetary unions]] (where applicable)

See more categories at Wikipedia:WikiProject Numismatics/Categories
Remove redundant [[Category:Currencies of Some Continent]] and [[Category:Circulating currencies]] on currently circulating currencies, as the 2 categories are already included in {{SomeContinent'sCurrency}} template.


Talk page: add {{Numismaticnotice}}


Add links to this currency article from the articles of the country/place, central bank, and mint, etc. (Perhaps the "See Also" section of those articles)
Cite error: There are <ref> tags on this page, but the references will not show without a {{reflist}} template (see the help page).