Wildlife Services

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Wildlife Services
APHIS.svg
Logo of the APHIS
Agency overview
Formed 1895
Preceding Agency Animal Damage Control
(in APHIS and FWS)
Jurisdiction Federal government of the United States
Headquarters Washington, D.C.
Employees 2,004 (FY10)
Annual budget US$121 million (FY10): 47.8% federal, 52.2% cooperator-provided
Agency executives Dr. Gregory Parham, Administrator of APHIS
William Clay, Deputy Administrator for Wildlife Services
Parent agency Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
Website www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife_damage

Wildlife Services is the program that provides Federal leadership and skill to resolve wildlife interactions that threaten public health and safety, as well as agricultural, property, and natural resources. The program is part of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).

Wildlife Services is tasked with protecting those resources from damage or threats posed by wildlife. It works in every state to conduct a program of integrated wildlife damage management in response to local requests. Wildlife damage management is a specialized field within the wildlife management profession.

History and Mission[edit]

Wildlife Services’ goals and objectives have evolved significantly since its establishment in 1895 as part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. At first the program focused on rodent management and predator control activities. Although its mission and legal authority have not changed, the range of activities has increased over time due to changing social needs.

Wildlife Services was formerly known (until 1997) as Animal Damage Control (ADC). From 1939 until 1985, Wildlife Services was part of the U.S. Department of the Interior. It returned to USDA, where it remains as part of APHIS, the agency whose mission is to protect the health and value of U.S. agriculture, natural and other resources.

The program is committed to the principle that wildlife is a publicly owned resource held in trust and carefully managed by state and federal agencies.

Responding to increasingly diverse requests for assistance, Wildlife Services has expanded its operational and research activities beyond its early emphasis on rabies and rodent control and livestock protection. Current programs now include threatened and endangered species conservation, the protection of public health and safety, wildlife disease surveillance and monitoring, research efforts emphasizing nonlethal methods, and other activities and programs. Wildlife Services plays a vital role in the Nation’s efforts to eliminate the negative environmental effects of invasive species.

The program’s mission is to provide Federal leadership among many groups to address wildlife-related problems in a science-based manner. Its primary statutory authorities are found in two acts of Congress: The Act of March 2, 1931, (46 Stat. 1468; 7 U.S.C. 426-426b) as amended, and The Act of December 22, 1987 (101 Stat. 1329-331, 7 U.S.C. 426c).

In many situations, the individual or institution requesting assistance, the cooperator, contributes financially to the management activity conducted by Wildlife Services. Congressional appropriations fund some programs and projects, such as surveillance for disease. Many operational activities are partnerships with local, state and other federal agencies.

Wildlife Services promotes an integrated wildlife damage management approach. That means conflicts are resolved by using a wide variety of methods to protect the valued property or agricultural resource, such as excluding wildlife from access and managing wildlife. Its staff responds to more than 200,000 human–wildlife interactions annually. Most are resolved using nonlethal methods including habitat modification, repellents, noise- and light-devices, and altered animal husbandry practices. It offers training to individuals and businesses.

The cost for Wildlife Services operational activities is shared, using federal funds and those supplied by the recipients of services. In FY10, more than one-third of Wildlife Services operational funds protected human health and safety (35%).[1] Agricultural resources protection accounted for 40 percent, with remaining work protecting natural resources and property. Projects were conducted on local, Tribal or state lands (41%), private property (32%) and federal lands (27%).[2]

Wildlife damage management can engender controversy, often around the use of lethal controls. Most wildlife encountered in damage situations (80.1%)[3] are dispersed. Removal of non-native species, such as European starlings, feral swine and nutria, account for most of the animals removed. A 20-member National Wildlife Services Advisory Committee,[4] appointed by the Secretary of Agriculture, advises the program and serves as a public forum.

Programs[edit]

The Wildlife Services Operational Program provides wildlife damage management assistance to the public, and is administered through two Regional Offices (Fort Collins, CO and Raleigh, NC) as well as State and District Offices in the 50 states, District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam. Program wildlife biologists provide technical advice and direct management assistance to individuals with problems related to wildlife. The public may access Wildlife Services assistance by calling 1-800/4USDA-WS (1-866-487-3297).

The Airport Wildlife Hazards Program provides leadership in addressing the conditions that contribute to aircraft-wildlife strikes throughout the Country. It works with the civil and military aviation community, specifically airports, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) to minimize wildlife strikes to aircraft and protect public safety.

The National Environmental Program ensures that program activities comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires federal agencies to evaluate environmental impacts within their decision-making processes. It ensures that environmental information is available to public officials and citizens before making decisions and taking actions. To fulfill this responsibility, Wildlife Services prepares analyses of the environmental effects of program activities.

The National Rabies Management Program, a multi-agency cooperative program led by Wildlife Services, implements a coordinated program to contain and eventually manage rabies in wildlife. With partners, the program conducts rabies control efforts in 25 states, including distributing oral rabies vaccination (ORV) and/or conducting enhanced wildlife rabies surveillance. The focus is on specific rabies virus strains in raccoons, coyotes, gray foxes, and feral dogs. It works closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Canadian and Mexican partners through the North American Rabies Management Plan.

The National Wildlife Disease Program safeguards agricultural trade by conducting surveillance activities in all 50 states in partnership with other organizations and promotes development of wildlife disease monitoring programs worldwide. It's Surveillance and Emergency Response System is the country’s only comprehensive, nationally coordinated system with the capability of addressing diseases in wildlife. Its wildlife disease biologists can mobilize and arrive on-site within 48 hours of a request. The program represents APHIS’ first line of defense against wildlife diseases that can move to humans and livestock.

The National Wildlife Research Center (NWRC) is devoted to resolving problems caused by the interaction of wild animals and society. NWRC applies scientific expertise to develop practical methods to resolve these problems and to maintain the quality of environments shared with wildlife. It evaluates damage situations and develops methods and tools to reduce or eliminate damage and resolve land-use conflicts. NWRC scientists study birds, mammalian predators, rodents, and other wildlife that cause serious, but localized, damage problems. It conducts studies to ensure that the methods developed are biologically sound, effective, safe, economical, and socially responsible. NWRC scientists produce the appropriate methods, technology, and materials for reducing animal damage. Through the publication of results and the exchange of technical information, NWRC provides valuable data and expertise to the public and the scientific community, as well as to APHIS's Wildlife Services program.

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