Willem van Mieris

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Willem van Mieris (top) and his father Frans, illustration by Aert Schouman and Jacob Houbraken for Jan van Gool's Nieuwe Schouburg


Willem van Mieris (3 June 1662 - 26 January 1747) was an 18th-century painter from the Northern Netherlands.

The Greengrocer by Willem van Mieris (1731) Oil on wood, 40 x 34 cm. Wallace Collection, London

He was born in Leiden as the son of Frans van Mieris sr. and brother of Jan van Mieris.[1] He was a member of the Leiden Guild of St. Luke and a founding member of the Leidse Tekenacademie which opened in 1694.[1] His pupils were Catharina Backer, Abraham Alensoon, and Hieronymous van de Mij.[1] He retired in 1736 because he was partially blind.[2] He died, aged 84, in Leiden.[1]

His works are extremely numerous and show the influence of Francis van Bossuit as well as his father.[1] As an artist, he did not equal his father.[3]

van Mieris has works in the Victoria and Albert Museum as well as Cheltenham and Derby Museum and Art Gallery.

Works[edit]

  • The Escaped Bird (1687)
  • A Seated Man (1688)
  • Cimon and Iphigeneia (1698)
  • Family Reunion (17th century)
  • Diana and her Nymphs (1702)
  • A Gentleman Offering a Lady a Bunch of Grapes (1707)
  • A Poultry Seller (1707)
  • The Apothecary (1710)
  • Man with Pipe (1710)
  • The Lute Player (1711)
  • Expulsion of Hagar (1724)
  • The Spinner (first half of the 18th century)
  • Interior with a Mother Attending her Children (1728)
  • An Old Man Reading (1729)
  • Green Grocer (1731), oil onwood, 40 x 34 cm, The Wallace Collection, London
  • Ecce Homo (18th century)
  • Suzanna and the Elders after Francis van Bossuit, Detroit Institute of Arts, displayed there as of 1909

Works after the painter[edit]

  • Portrait of Willem van Mieris, painted by Taco Hajo Jeigersma

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Willem van Mieris in the RKD
  2. ^ Works and literature on Willem van Mieris
  3. ^ van Mieris family, New International Encyclopedia, accessed August 2011