William A. McNulty

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search


William Anderson McNulty
Colonel William A. McNulty.jpg
Born (1910-09-29)September 29, 1910
Roanoke, Virginia
Died January 25, 2005(2005-01-25) (aged 94)
Roanoke, Virginia
Allegiance United StatesUnited States of America
Service/branch United States Army seal United States Army
Years of service 1932-1962
Rank US-O6 insignia.svg Colonel
Service number 0-18871
Commands held 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment
Battles/wars World War II
Cold War
Awards Silver Star
Legion of Merit
Bronze Star Medal


Colonel William Anderson McNulty (September 29, 1910 - January 25, 2005) was a decorated officer of the United States of America during World War II.

Early years[edit]

McNulty was born on September 29, 1910 in Roanoke, Virginia as a son of Charles See McNulty, Sr. and his wife Anna Aylett. He attended Jefferson High School and then enrolled the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York and graduated in summer 1932. He was commissioned a Second lieutenant in the Infantry and was assigned to the 29th Infantry Regiment at Fort Benning, Georgia.

World War II[edit]

During the War, McNulty served as a battalion commander of then Lt. Gen., later, full General George S. Patton’s Third United States Army command. It was Lt. Col. McNulty's command, the 3rd Battalion, 301st Infantry Regiment of the Third Army’s 94th Division,[1] that in face of withering defensive artillery, tank, antitank and machine gun fire and with McNulty heroically at its head,[2] forded in the dead of winter on February 23, 1945 the icy and swollen Saar River in southwest Germany at the then Siegfried Line to become the first Third Army troops to enter upon German soil, seizing the east bank German city of Serrig and establishing the vital bridgehead, which the balance of the Third Army used to sweep into the German Saarland,[3] thereafter, taking the German cities of Trier, Coblenz, Bingen[disambiguation needed], Worms, Mainz, Kaiserslautern and Ludwigshafen, while killing or wounding 99,000 German troops and capturing another 140,112 of them, which represented virtually all of the remnants of the German First Army and the German Seventh Army.[4]

Third Army command decided that the 3rd Battalion, 301st Infantry Regiment would establish the bridgehead from Serrig,[5] but intelligence could provide very little information on enemy dispositions.[6] Not to be deterred, William McNulty himself secretly reconnoitered the proposed Saar crossing and enemy positions the night prior to the 3rd /301st ’s assault upon the German positions.[7] The following day the troops of the 3rd/301st, again, in face of withering defensive fire and with their commander Lt. Col. McNulty, exposed at their lead, inspiring and directing them, forded the Saar River to attack and capture the city of Serrig, Germany.[8] For his actions at the Saar on February 23, 1945, Lt. Col. William A. McNulty was awarded both the Legion of Merit and the Silver Star.

Medals and decorations[edit]

Here are some medals and decorations of Colonel McNulty:[9]

Combat Infantry Badge.svg Combat Infantryman Badge
Silver Star
Legion of Merit
Bronze Star Medal
Purple Heart
American Defense Service Medal
American Campaign Medal
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with 4 service stars
World War II Victory Medal
Army of Occupation Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
National Defense Service Medal with one Oak Leaf Cluster
Chevalier of the Legion of Honour
French Croix de Guerre 1939-1945 with Palm
Czechoslovak War Cross 1939-1945


External links[edit]

  • [1] Find A Grave, additional photograph of the Colonel and information on his later military career are here available for view

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tony Le Tissier Patton’s Pawns The 94th U.S. Infantry Division at the Siegfried Line (2007) University of Alabama Press, pp. 307, 352
  2. ^ Citation text of General Orders: Headquarters, 3d Army, General Order No. 158 (July 2, 1945), awarding Lt. Col. William A. McNulty the Silver Star
  3. ^ Tony Le Tissier Patton’s Pawns The 94th U.S. Infantry Division at the Siegfried Line (2007) University of Alabama Press, Chapter 8 “Crossing the Saar” (commencing at p. 147) p. 158
  4. ^ See, generally, D'Este, Carlo (1995), Patton: A Genius for War, New York City, New York: Harper Collins, ISBN 0-06-016455-7
  5. ^ Tony Le Tissier Patton’s Pawns The 94th U.S. Infantry Division at the Siegfried Line (2007) University of Alabama Press, Chapter 8 “Crossing the Saar” (commencing at p. 147) p. 152
  6. ^ Tony Le Tissier Patton’s Pawns The 94th U.S. Infantry Division at the Siegfried Line (2007) University of Alabama Press, Chapter 8 “Crossing the Saar” (commencing at p. 147) p. 149
  7. ^ again, Citation text of General Orders: Headquarters, 3d Army, General Order No. 158 (July 2, 1945), awarding Lt. Col. William A. McNulty the Silver Star
  8. ^ again, Citation text of General Orders: Headquarters, 3d Army, General Order No. 158 (July 2, 1945), awarding Lt. Col. William A. McNulty the Silver Star
  9. ^ See, also, generally, L.G. Byrnes History of the 94th Infantry Division in WWII Nashville: The Battery Press (1982) and Tony Le Tissier Patton’s Pawns The 94th U.S. Infantry Division at the Siegfried Line (2007) University of Alabama Press, additionally, at pages. 72, 78, 111, 141 for other mention of McNulty and the entirety of its Chapter 8, titled “Crossing the Saar” for context and further detail.