William B. and Mary Chase Stratton House

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William B. and Mary Chase Stratton House
Stratten.JPG
Location 938 Three Mile Dr., Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan
Coordinates 42°22′43″N 82°55′24″W / 42.37861°N 82.92333°W / 42.37861; -82.92333Coordinates: 42°22′43″N 82°55′24″W / 42.37861°N 82.92333°W / 42.37861; -82.92333
Built 1927
Architect William Buck Stratton
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 84001867[1]
Added to NRHP May 24, 1984

The William B. and Mary Chase Stratton House is a private house located at 938 Three Mile Dr. in Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.[1]

Description[edit]

The William B. and Mary Chase Stratton House was built as a collaborative venture between husband-and-wife William Buck Stratton (an architect) and Mary Chase Perry Stratton (a ceramicist).[2] The two-story house is constructed of hollow tile with steel beams faced with varicolored brick shading from brown to beige. The house is irregularly massed and crowned with a low-pitched roof covered with unglazed tiles of Pewabic Pottery, produced by Mary Chase Perry Stratton's company which is a National Historic Landmark in Detroit.

The house design was heavily influenced by the Arts and Crafts Movement, and the Strattons used natural material, texture, and color to create an original and masterly composition.[2] The interior of the house holds a simple elegance, and is notable for the fine composition and harmony both within the house and between the interior and the landscaped grounds.

History[edit]

William Stratton began his planning for the house in 1912, six years before he married Mary Chase Perry in 1918.[3] The home in Grosse Pointe was built in 1927.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ a b "William B. and Mary Chase Stratton House". Michigan State Housing Development Authority: Historic Sites Online. Retrieved March 13, 2010. 
  3. ^ Andrews, Wayne (1982). Architecture in Michigan. Wayne State University Press. p. 153. ISBN 0-8143-1719-7.