William Blinn

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William Blinn
Born William Taylor Blinn
(1937-07-21) July 21, 1937 (age 77)
Clayton, Indiana, United States
Occupation Screenwriter, television producer

William Frederick Blinn (born July 21, 1937) is an American screenwriter and television producer.

Biography[edit]

Career[edit]

Born in Toledo, Ohio, Blinn began his career in television in the 1960s. As a screenwriter, Blinn has written episodes of Rawhide, Here Come the Brides, Gunsmoke, The Rookies, and Fame (where he also served as executive producer[1]). In 1971, Blinn wrote the screenplay for the television movie Brian's Song for which he won an Emmy and Peabody Award. He won a second Emmy in 1977 for his work on the miniseries Roots. Blinn also created two series for producing mogul Aaron Spelling: Starsky and Hutch (Blinn later produced the 2004 film of the same name[2]); and the less-successful Heaven Help Us, which co-starred Ricardo Montalban of Fantasy Island fame. He was the executive producer of the 1974 ABC series The New Land, and he created the short-lived 1977 CBS espionage series Hunter and wrote its unaired 1976 pilot.

Other famous William Blinn series are Eight is Enough and Fame.

In addition to screenwriting (which includes Purple Rain), Blinn has also produced several television series and television movies including Aaron's Way, Polly: Comin' Home!, and Pensacola: Wings of Gold.[2]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Award Result Category Film or series
1972 Emmy Award Won Outstanding Writing Achievement in Drama - Adaptation Brian's Song
1977 Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series Roots (Shared with Ernest Kinoy)
1982 Nominated Outstanding Drama Series Fame (Shared with Gerald I. Isenberg, Stan Rogow, and Mel Swope)
1983 Outstanding Drama Series Fame (Shared with Mel Swope)
1984 Outstanding Drama Series Fame (Shared with Ken Ehrlich)
1977 Humanitas Prize Won 60 Minute Category Roots (Shared with James Lee for episode #4)
1996 Nominated 90 Minute Category The Boys Next Door
1972 Peabody Awards Won
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Brian's Song
1997 Writers Guild of America Award Adapted Long Form The Boys Next Door

References[edit]

  1. ^ Blinn, William (2001-04-20). "If Hollywood Takes the Credit, It Must Also Share the Blame". The L.A. Times. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  2. ^ a b "William Blinn Biography (1937-)". filmreference.com. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 

External links[edit]