William Breman Jewish Heritage & Holocaust Museum

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The William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum
Breman Jewish Museum.jpg
The Dr. Seuss exhibit at the Breman
William Breman Jewish Heritage & Holocaust Museum is located in Atlanta
William Breman Jewish Heritage & Holocaust Museum
Location within Atlanta
Established 1996
Location 1440 Spring Street NW
Atlanta, United States
Coordinates 33°47′38″N 84°23′19″W / 33.793955°N 84.388626°W / 33.793955; -84.388626Coordinates: 33°47′38″N 84°23′19″W / 33.793955°N 84.388626°W / 33.793955; -84.388626
Type Holocaust museum
Jewish Museum
Director Aaron Berger
Curator Timothy Frilingos
Public transit access Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (logo).svg           Arts Center
Website www.thebreman.org

The William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum (the Breman) is a museum in Atlanta dedicated to Jewish history, with special emphasis on Georgia and the Holocaust. The Breman, which opened in 1996,[1] is the largest museum of its kind in the Southeast,[2] and it is located at the corner of 18th Street and Spring Street, across the street from the Center for Puppetry Arts, in Midtown. The museum is named for Atlanta businessman William Breman, a philanthropist active in the Jewish community of Atlanta.[2]

Exhibitions[edit]

The museum has several exhibitions, permanent and traveling, which educate visitors about Jewish values, customs and traditions. Through multimedia works such as film, music, and visual arts, exhibits explore universal themes, such as personal responsibility, community building and cross-cultural understanding.

The two permanent exhibitions are Absence of Humanity: The Holocaust Years and Creating Community: The Jews of Atlanta from 1845 to the Present.

Past exhibitions have featured words and pictures by Maurice Sendak, author of "Where the Wild Things Are" and an exploration of the Golden Age of Comic Books, 1938-1950.

Research & Collections[edit]

Also housed at the Breman Museum are the Cuba Archives and Genealogy center, documenting the history of Jewish life in Georgia and Alabama. This particular collection has personal stories and historical memorabilia.This museum has an extensive exhibit pertaining to the struggles the Jewish people endured in Poland,Germany,Czechslovakia,and Greece,before,during,and after the Holocaust.There is a plethora of oral history exhibits where the surviving victims of Nazi persecution describe the horrors of life under the Nazis.Marty Storch,Helen Spiegel,and Joel Hecht give us eyewitness,graphic accounts of what happened.

References[edit]

External links[edit]